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Hideyuki Kano, Antonio Meola, Huai-che Yang, Wan-Yuo Guo, Roberto Martínez-Alvarez, Nuria Martínez-Moreno, Dusan Urgosik, Roman Liscak, Or Cohen-Inbar, Jason Sheehan, John Y. K. Lee, Mahmoud Abbassy, Gene H. Barnett, David Mathieu, Douglas Kondziolka and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

For some jugular foramen schwannomas (JFSs), complete resection is possible but may be associated with significant morbidity. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a minimally invasive alternative or adjunct to microsurgery for JFSs. The authors reviewed clinical and imaging outcomes of SRS for patients with these tumors.

METHODS

Nine participating centers of the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation identified 92 patients who underwent SRS between 1990 and 2013. Forty-one patients had prior subtotal microsurgical resection. The median interval between previous surgery and SRS was 15 months (range 0.5–144 months). Eighty-four patients had preexisting cranial nerve (CN) symptoms and signs. The median tumor volume was 4.1 cm3 (range 0.8–22.6 cm3), and the median margin dose was 12.5 Gy (range 10–18 Gy). Patients with neurofibromatosis were excluded from this study.

RESULTS

The median follow-up was 51 months (range 6–266 months). Tumors regressed in 47 patients, remained stable in 33, and progressed in 12. The progression-free survival (PFS) was 93% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years, and 82% at 10 years. In the entire series, only a dumbbell shape (extension extracranially via the jugular foramen) was significantly associated with worse PFS. In the group of patients without prior microsurgery (n = 51), factors associated with better PFS included tumor volume < 6 cm3 (p = 0.037) and non–dumbbell-shaped tumors (p = 0.015). Preexisting cranial neuropathies improved in 27 patients, remained stable in 51, and worsened in 14. The CN function improved after SRS in 12% of patients at 1 year, 24% at 2 years, 27% at 3 years, and 32% at 5 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in 7 patients at a median of 7 months after SRS (range 5–38 months). Six patients underwent repeat SRS at a median of 64 months (range 44–134 months). Four patients underwent resection at a median of 14 months after SRS (range 8–30 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery proved to be a safe and effective primary or adjuvant management approach for JFSs. Long-term tumor control rates and stability or improvement in CN function were confirmed.

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Hideyuki Kano, Antonio Meola, Huai-che Yang, Wan-Yuo Guo, Roberto Martínez-Alvarez, Nuria Martínez-Moreno, Dusan Urgosik, Roman Liscak, Or Cohen-Inbar, Jason Sheehan, John Y. K. Lee, Mahmoud Abbassy, Gene H. Barnett, David Mathieu, Douglas Kondziolka and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

For some jugular foramen schwannomas (JFSs), complete resection is possible but may be associated with significant morbidity. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a minimally invasive alternative or adjunct to microsurgery for JFSs. The authors reviewed clinical and imaging outcomes of SRS for patients with these tumors.

METHODS

Nine participating centers of the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation identified 92 patients who underwent SRS between 1990 and 2013. Forty-one patients had prior subtotal microsurgical resection. The median interval between previous surgery and SRS was 15 months (range 0.5–144 months). Eighty-four patients had preexisting cranial nerve (CN) symptoms and signs. The median tumor volume was 4.1 cm3 (range 0.8–22.6 cm3), and the median margin dose was 12.5 Gy (range 10–18 Gy). Patients with neurofibromatosis were excluded from this study.

RESULTS

The median follow-up was 51 months (range 6–266 months). Tumors regressed in 47 patients, remained stable in 33, and progressed in 12. The progression-free survival (PFS) was 93% at 3 years, 87% at 5 years, and 82% at 10 years. In the entire series, only a dumbbell shape (extension extracranially via the jugular foramen) was significantly associated with worse PFS. In the group of patients without prior microsurgery (n = 51), factors associated with better PFS included tumor volume < 6 cm3 (p = 0.037) and non–dumbbell-shaped tumors (p = 0.015). Preexisting cranial neuropathies improved in 27 patients, remained stable in 51, and worsened in 14. The CN function improved after SRS in 12% of patients at 1 year, 24% at 2 years, 27% at 3 years, and 32% at 5 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in 7 patients at a median of 7 months after SRS (range 5–38 months). Six patients underwent repeat SRS at a median of 64 months (range 44–134 months). Four patients underwent resection at a median of 14 months after SRS (range 8–30 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery proved to be a safe and effective primary or adjuvant management approach for JFSs. Long-term tumor control rates and stability or improvement in CN function were confirmed.

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Or Cohen-Inbar, Cheng-Chia Lee, Seyed H. Mousavi, Hideyuki Kano, David Mathieu, Antonio Meola, Peter Nakaji, Norissa Honea, Matthew Johnson, Mahmoud Abbassy, Alireza M. Mohammadi, Danilo Silva, Huai-Che Yang, Inga Grills, Douglas Kondziolka, Gene H. Barnett, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are rare tumors widely recognized for their aggressive clinical behavior, high recurrence rates, and distant and extracranial metastases even after a gross-total resection. The authors report a large multicenter study, through the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation (IGKRF), reviewing management and outcome following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for recurrent or newly discovered HPCs.

METHODS

Eight centers participating in the IGKRF participated in this study. A total of 90 patients harboring 133 tumors were identified. Patients were included if they had a histologically diagnosed HPC managed with SRS during the period 1988–2014 and had a minimum of 6 months' clinical and radiological follow-up. A de-identified database was created. The patients' median age was 48.5 years (range 13–80 years). Prior treatments included embolization (n = 8), chemotherapy (n = 2), and fractionated radiotherapy (n = 34). The median tumor volume at the time of SRS was 4.9 cm3 (range 0.2–42.4 cm3). WHO Grade II (typical) HPCs formed 78.9% of the cohort (n = 71). The median margin and maximum doses delivered were 15 Gy (range 2.8–24 Gy) and 32 Gy (range 8–51 Gy), respectively. The median clinical and radiographic follow-up periods were 59 months (range 6–190 months) and 59 months (range 6–183 months), respectively. Prognostic variables associated with local tumor control and post-SRS survival were evaluated using Cox univariate and multivariate analysis. Actuarial survival after SRS was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method.

RESULTS

Imaging studies performed at last follow-up demonstrated local tumor control in 55% of tumors and 62.2% of patients. New remote intracranial tumors were found in 27.8% of patients, and 24.4% of patients developed extracranial metastases. Adverse radiation effects were noted in 6.7% of patients. During the study period, 32.2% of the patients (n = 29) died. The actuarial overall survival was 91.5%, 82.1%, 73.9%, 56.7%, and 53.7% at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years, respectively, after initial SRS. Local progression–free survival (PFS) was 81.7%, 66.3%, 54.5%, 37.2%, and 25.5% at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years, respectively, after initial SRS. In our cohort, 32 patients underwent 48 repeat SRS procedures for 76 lesions. Review of these 76 treated tumors showed that 17 presented as an in-field recurrence and 59 were defined as an out-of-field recurrence. Margin dose greater than 16 Gy (p = 0.037) and tumor grade (p = 0.006) were shown to influence PFS. The development of extracranial metastases was shown to influence overall survival (p = 0.029) in terms of PFS; repeat (multiple) SRS showed additional benefit.

CONCLUSIONS

SRS provides a reasonable rate of local tumor control and a low risk of adverse effects. It also leads to neurological stability or improvement in the majority of patients. Long-term close clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary due to the high probability of local recurrence and distant metastases. Repeat SRS is often effective for treating new or recurrent HPCs.

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Or Cohen-Inbar, Robert M. Starke, Hideyuki Kano, Gregory Bowden, Paul Huang, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, David Mathieu, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, John Y. K. Lee, Gene H. Barnett, Douglas Kondziolka, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) represent the majority of infratentorial AVMs and frequently have a hemorrhagic presentation. In this multicenter study, the authors review outcomes of cerebellar AVMs after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

METHODS

Eight medical centers contributed data from 162 patients with cerebellar AVMs managed with SRS. Of these patients, 65% presented with hemorrhage. The median maximal nidus diameter was 2 cm. Favorable outcome was defined as AVM obliteration and no posttreatment hemorrhage or permanent radiation-induced complications (RICs). Patients were followed clinically and radiographically, with a median follow-up of 60 months (range 7–325 months).

RESULTS

The overall actuarial rates of obliteration at 3, 5, 7, and 10 years were 38.3%, 74.2%, 81.4%, and 86.1%, respectively, after single-session SRS. Obliteration and a favorable outcome were more likely to be achieved in patients treated with a margin dose greater than 18 Gy (p < 0.001 for both), demonstrating significantly better rates (83.3% and 79%, respectively). The rate of latency preobliteration hemorrhage was 0.85%/year. Symptomatic post-SRS RICs developed in 4.5% of patients (n = 7). Predictors of a favorable outcome were a smaller nidus (p = 0.0001), no pre-SRS embolization (p = 0.003), no prior hemorrhage (p = 0.0001), a higher margin dose (p = 0.0001), and a higher maximal dose (p = 0.009). The Spetzler-Martin grade was not found to be predictive of outcome. The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale score (p = 0.0001) and the Radiosurgery-Based AVM Scale score (p = 0.0001) were predictive of a favorable outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

SRS results in successful obliteration and a favorable outcome in the majority of patients with cerebellar AVMs. Most patients will require a nidus dose of higher than 18 Gy to achieve these goals. Radiosurgical and not microsurgical scales were predictive of clinical outcome after SRS.

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Or Cohen-Inbar, Robert M. Starke, Gabriella Paisan, Hideyuki Kano, Paul P. Huang, Rafael Rodriguez-Mercado, Luis Almodovar, Inga S. Grills, David Mathieu, Danilo Silva, Mahmoud Abbassy, Symeon Missios, John Y. K. Lee, Gene H. Barnett, Douglas Kondziolka, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

The goal of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is complete nidus obliteration, thereby eliminating the risk of future hemorrhage. This outcome can be observed within the first 18 months, although documentation of AVM obliteration can extend to as much as 5 years after SRS is performed. A shorter time to obliteration may impact the frequency and effect of post-SRS complications and latency hemorrhage. The authors' goal in the present study was to determine predictors of early obliteration (18 months or less) following SRS for cerebral AVM.

METHODS

Eight centers participating in the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation (IGKRF) obtained institutional review board approval to supply de-identified patient data. From a cohort of 2231 patients, a total of 1398 patients had confirmed AVM obliteration. Patients were sorted into early responders (198 patients), defined as those with confirmed nidus obliteration at or prior to 18 months after SRS, and late responders (1200 patients), defined as those with confirmed nidus obliteration more than 18 months after SRS. The median clinical follow-up time was 63.7 months (range 7–324.7 months).

RESULTS

Outcome parameters including latency interval hemorrhage, mortality, and favorable outcome were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Radiologically demonstrated radiation-induced changes were noted more often in the late responder group (376 patients [31.3%] vs 39 patients [19.7%] for early responders, p = 0.005). Multivariate independent predictors of early obliteration included a margin dose > 24 Gy (p = 0.031), prior surgery (p = 0.002), no prior radiotherapy (p = 0.025), smaller AVM nidus (p = 0.002), deep venous drainage (p = 0.039), and nidus location (p < 0.0001). Basal ganglia, cerebellum, and frontal lobe nidus locations favored early obliteration (p = 0.009). The Virginia Radiosurgery AVM Scale (VRAS) score was significantly different between the 2 responder groups (p = 0.039). The VRAS score was also shown to be predictive of early obliteration on univariate analysis (p = 0.009). For early obliteration, such prognostic ability was not shown for other SRS- and AVM-related grading systems.

CONCLUSIONS

Early obliteration (≤ 18 months post-SRS) was more common in patients whose AVMs were smaller, located in the frontal lobe, basal ganglia, or cerebellum, had deep venous drainage, and had received a margin dose > 24 Gy.