Browse

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • By Author: Kalani, M. Yashar S. x
  • By Author: Yagmurlu, Kaan x
Clear All
Restricted access

Sam Safavi-Abbasi, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Ben Frock, Hai Sun, Kaan Yagmurlu, Felix Moron, Laura A. Snyder, Randy J. Hlubek, Joseph M. Zabramski, Peter Nakaji and Robert F. Spetzler

OBJECTIVE

Fusiform cerebral aneurysms represent a small portion of intracranial aneurysms; differ in natural history, anatomy, and pathology; and can be difficult to treat compared with saccular aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to examine the techniques of treatment of ruptured and unruptured fusiform intracranial aneurysms and patient outcomes.

METHODS

In 45 patients with fusiform aneurysms, the authors retrospectively reviewed the presentation, location, and shape of the aneurysm; the microsurgical technique; the outcome at discharge and last follow-up; and the change in the aneurysm at last angiographic follow-up.

RESULTS

Overall, 48 fusiform aneurysms were treated in 45 patients (18 male, 27 female) with a mean age of 49 years (median 51 years; range 6 months–76 years). Twelve patients (27%) had ruptured aneurysms and 33 (73%) had unruptured aneurysms. The mean aneurysm size was 8.9 mm (range 6–28 mm). The aneurysms were treated by clip reconstruction (n = 22 [46%]), clip-wrapping (n = 18 [38%]), and vascular bypass (n = 8 [17%]). The mean (SD) hospital stay was 19.0 ± 7.4 days for the 12 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 7.0 ± 5.6 days for the 33 patients with unruptured aneurysms. The mean follow-up was 38.7 ± 29.5 months (median 36 months; range 6–96 months). The mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score for the 12 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage was 3.9; for the 33 patients with unruptured aneurysms, it was 4.8. No rehemorrhages occurred during follow-up. The overall annual risk of recurrence was 2% and that of rehemorrhage was 0%.

CONCLUSIONS

Fusiform and dolichoectatic aneurysms involving the entire vessel wall must be investigated individually. Although some of these aneurysms may be amenable to primary clipping and clip reconstruction, these complex lesions often require alternative microsurgical and endovascular treatment. These techniques can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates and with low rates of early rebleeding and recurrence.

Restricted access

Kaan Yagmurlu, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Mark C. Preul and Robert F. Spetzler

The authors describe a safe entry zone, the superior fovea triangle, on the floor of the fourth ventricle for resection of deep dorsal pontine lesions at the level of the facial colliculus. Clinical data from a patient undergoing a suboccipital telovelar transsuperior fovea triangle approach to a deep pontine cavernous malformation were reviewed and supplemented with 6 formalin-fixed adult human brainstem and 2 silicone-injected adult human cadaveric heads using the fiber dissection technique to illustrate the utility of this novel safe entry zone. The superior fovea has a triangular shape that is an important landmark for the motor nucleus of the trigeminal, abducens, and facial nerves. The inferior half of the superior fovea triangle may be incised to remove deep dorsal pontine lesions through the floor of the fourth ventricle. The superior fovea triangle may be used as a safe entry zone for dorsally located lesions at the level of the facial colliculus.

Full access

M. Yashar S. Kalani, Kaan Yagmurlu, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Daniel D. Cavalcanti and Robert F. Spetzler

Free access

Kaan Yagmurlu, Sam Safavi-Abbasi, Evgenii Belykh, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Peter Nakaji, Albert L. Rhoton Jr., Robert F. Spetzler and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this investigation was to modify the mini-pterional and mini-orbitozygomatic (mini-OZ) approaches in order to reduce the amount of tissue traumatization caused and to compare the use of the 2 approaches in the removal of circle of Willis aneurysms based on the authors' clinical experience and quantitative analysis.

METHODS

Three formalin-fixed adult cadaveric heads injected with colored silicone were examined. Surgical freedom and angle of attack of the mini-pterional and mini-OZ approaches were measured at 9 anatomical points, and the measurements were compared. The authors also retrospectively reviewed the cases of 396 patients with ruptured and unruptured single aneurysms in the circle of Willis treated by microsurgical techniques at their institution between January 2006 and November 2014.

RESULTS

A significant difference in surgical freedom was found in favor of the mini-pterional approach for access to the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcations, the most distal point of the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and the basilar artery (BA) tip. No statistically significant differences were found between the mini-pterional and mini-OZ approaches for access to the posterior clinoid process, the most distal point of the superior cerebellar artery (SCA), the anterior communicating artery (ACoA), the contralateral ICA bifurcation, and the most distal point of the contralateral MCA. A trend toward increasing surgical freedom was found for the mini-OZ approach to the ACoA and the contralateral ICA bifurcation. The lengths exposed through the mini-OZ approach were longer than those exposed by the mini-pterional approach for the ipsilateral PCA segment (11.5 ± 1.9 mm) between the BA and the most distal point of the P2 segment of the PCA, for the ipsilateral SCA (10.5 ± 1.1 mm) between the BA and the most distal point of the SCA, and for the contralateral anterior cerebral artery (ACA) (21 ± 6.1 mm) between the ICA bifurcation and the most distal point of the A2 segment of the ACA. The exposed length of the contralateral MCA (24.2 ± 8.6 mm) between the contralateral ICA bifurcation and the most distal point of the MCA segment was longer through the mini-pterional approach. The vertical angle of attack (anteroposterior direction) was significantly greater with the mini-pterional approach than with the mini-OZ approach, except in the ACoA and contralateral ICA bifurcation. The horizontal angle of attack (mediolateral direction) was similar with both approaches, except in the ACoA, contralateral ICA bifurcation, and contralateral MCA bifurcation, where the angle was significantly increased in the mini-OZ approach.

CONCLUSIONS

The mini-pterional and mini-OZ approaches, as currently performed in select patients, provide less tissue traumatization (i.e., less temporal muscle manipulation, less brain parenchyma retraction) from the skin to the aneurysm than standard approaches. Anatomical quantitative analysis showed that the mini-OZ approach provides better exposure to the contralateral side for controlling the contralateral parent arteries and multiple aneurysms. The mini-pterional approach has greater surgical freedom (maneuverability) for ipsilateral circle of Willis aneurysms.