Browse

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • By Author: Jallo, George I. x
  • By Author: Groves, Mari L. x
Clear All
Restricted access

David S. Hersh, Nir Shimony, Mari L. Groves, Gerald F. Tuite, George I. Jallo, Ann Liu, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Thierry A. G. M. Huisman, Ryan J. Felling, Joseph A. Kufera and Edward S. Ahn

OBJECTIVE

Pediatric cerebral venous sinus thrombosis has been previously described in the setting of blunt head trauma; however, the population demographics, risk factors for thrombosis, and the risks and benefits of detection and treatment in this patient population are poorly defined. Furthermore, few reports differentiate between different forms of sinus pathology. A series of pediatric patients with skull fractures who underwent venous imaging and were diagnosed with intrinsic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis or extrinsic sinus compression is presented.

METHODS

The medical records of patients at 2 pediatric trauma centers were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who were evaluated for blunt head trauma from January 2003 to December 2013, diagnosed with a skull fracture, and underwent venous imaging were included.

RESULTS

Of 2224 pediatric patients with skull fractures following blunt trauma, 41 patients (2%) underwent venous imaging. Of these, 8 patients (20%) had intrinsic sinus thrombosis and 14 patients (34%) displayed extrinsic compression of a venous sinus. Three patients with intrinsic sinus thrombosis developed venous infarcts, and 2 of these patients were treated with anticoagulation. One patient with extrinsic sinus compression by a depressed skull fracture underwent surgical elevation of the fracture. All patients with sinus pathology were discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation. Among patients who underwent follow-up imaging, the sinus pathology had resolved by 6 months postinjury in 80% of patients with intrinsic thrombosis as well as 80% of patients with extrinsic compression. All patients with intrinsic thrombosis or extrinsic compression had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5 at their last follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

In this series of pediatric trauma patients who underwent venous imaging for suspected thrombosis, the yield of detecting intrinsic thrombosis and/or extrinsic compression of a venous sinus was high. However, few patients developed venous hypertension or infarction and were subsequently treated with anticoagulation or surgical decompression of the sinus. Most had spontaneous resolution and good neurological outcomes without treatment. Therefore, in the setting of pediatric skull fractures after blunt injury, venous imaging is recommended when venous hypertension or infarction is suspected and anticoagulation is being considered. However, there is little indication for pervasive venous imaging after pediatric skull fractures, especially in light of the potential risks of CT venography or MR venography in the pediatric population and the unclear benefits of anticoagulation.

Free access

David S. Hersh, Rajiv R. Iyer, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Ann Liu, George I. Jallo and Mari L. Groves

OBJECTIVE

Spinal deformity has become a well-recognized complication of intramedullary spinal cord tumor (IMSCT) resection. In particular, laminectomy can result in biomechanical instability caused by loss of the posterior tension band. Therefore, laminoplasty has been proposed as an alternative to laminectomy. Here, the authors describe the largest current series of pediatric patients who have undergone laminoplasty for IMSCT resection and investigate the need for surgical fusion after both laminectomy and laminoplasty.

METHODS

The medical records of pediatric patients who underwent resection of an IMSCT at a single institution between November 2003 and May 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, histopathological, and follow-up data were collected.

RESULTS

Sixty-six consecutive patients underwent resection of an IMSCT during the study period. Forty-three (65%) patients were male. The patients had a median age of 12.9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 7.2–16.5 years) at the time of surgery. Patients typically presented with a tumor that involved the cervical and/or thoracic spine. Nineteen (29%) patients underwent laminectomy, and 47 (71%) patients underwent laminoplasty. Patients in each cohort had a similar rate of postoperative deformity. Overall, 10 (15%) patients required instrumented spinal fusion for spinal deformity. Four patients required revision of the primary fusion.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings show that among pediatric patients with an IMSCT, postoperative surgical fusion rates remain high, even after laminoplasty. Known risk factors, such as the age of the patient, location of the tumor, and the number of involved levels, might play a larger role than replacement of the laminae in determining the rate of surgical fusion after IMSCT resection.

Full access

Mari L. Groves, Patricia L. Zadnik, Pablo F. Recinos, Violette Renard and George I. Jallo

The authors present a case of a 27-year-old patient who presented with spastic gait and worsening difficulty walking over a 6 month period. Spinal MR imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing intramedullary spinal cord tumor (IMSCT) with associated syrinx in the cervical spine. The lesion was resected through posterior en bloc laminotomy, durotomy, and microscopic resection of the intramedullary component followed by laminoplasty reconstruction. Surgical resections with a goal of gross total resection can significantly improve overall survival and progression free survival in patients with low-grade IMSCT. The procedure is presented in an edited, high-definition format with accompanying narrative.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/Ui9bn82PtP8.