Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 137 items for

  • By Author: Wilson, Charles B. x
Clear All
Restricted access

Charles B. Wilson and William Markesbery

Restricted access

Frank H. Mayfield and Charles B. Wilson

Restricted access

Edgar A. Bering Jr., Charles B. Wilson and Horace A. Norrell Jr.

Restricted access

Charles B. Wilson, Edwin P. Jenevein Jr. and Lester R. Bryant

Restricted access

Charles B. Wilson

Restricted access

E. Fletcher Eyster and Charles B. Wilson

Restricted access

Graded cryohypophysectomy in the rhesus monkey

Histopathology and endocrine function

Suleyman Saglam, Clifford L. Kragt, Charles B. Wilson, Selna L. Kaplan and Marvin Barker

✓ Histopathology and endocrine function of the pituitary gland of rhesus monkeys subjected to graded cryohypophysectomy were compared with the histopathology and endocrine function in hypophysectomized and sham-operated monkeys. Freezing at −50°, −100°, and −150°C destroyed 72.3%, 78.3%, and 93.1% of the pituitary respectively. The posterior lobe was more resistant to the damaging effects of cold. A nearly complete (96.3%) histological hypophysectomy was accomplished at −190°C; nearly all remaining viable tissue was in the posterior lobe. Freezing at −150°C appears to result in a complete functional hypophysectomy. Of the adenohypophyseal cells, the gonadotropin-secreting cells were the most susceptible to cold, with the growth-hormone-producing cells next in susceptibility. Adrenocorticotropin-secreting cells were more resistant. Cells producing thyroid-stimulating hormones were not susceptible, and the pituitary stalk was quite resistant to the damaging effects of freezing at these temperatures. Thus, a predictable partial hypophysectomy by means of cryosurgery seems feasible, and, with a predetermined time, it is evident that the degree of cold is critical in achieving a complete cryohypophysectomy.

Restricted access

Sinsuke Hukuda and Charles B. Wilson

✓ Maximal tolerable compression was produced in 28 dogs by advancing a screw through the anterior portion of the C-5 vertebral body into the spinal canal until limb weakness occurred. Chronic vascular insufficiency was established in the cervical cord of 17 dogs by blocking or ligating the spinal and vertebral arteries and their branches in various combinations. Vascular insufficiency was also established in combination with maximal compression. Neurological, microangiographic, and histological findings in all groups of dogs were compared. Dogs in the last group with the most severe injury had more abnormal findings in surface vessels than did all other dogs. When the dogs were bled to the point of weakness, that point also appeared soonest in the last group. From these findings, the authors conclude that the effects of vascular insufficiency and compression are additive and that this may be an explanation of the clinical signs in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who appear to have relatively slight mechanical compression.

Restricted access

Justin Renaudin, Derek Fewer, Charles B. Wilson, Edwin B. Boldrey, John Calogero and K. Jean Enot

✓ Twenty patients seriously ill following subtotal excision of brain tumors were given unusually large doses of Decadron to restrain peritumoral edema. The prompt clinical effect was strikingly favorable in 11. The dosage of Decadron above which no additional anti-edema effect occurs must be established for each individual patient. No significant complications occurred under dosages ranging from 32 to 96 mg/day. Brain scintiscans performed after rapid clinical improvement in five cases showed no change.