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  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine x
  • By Author: Matsumoto, Morio x
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Sanjeev Ariyandath Sreenivasan, Kanwaljeet Garg, Manmohan Singh and Poodipedi Sarat Chandra

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Satoshi Nori, Akio Iwanami, Akimasa Yasuda, Narihito Nagoshi, Nobuyuki Fujita, Tomohiro Hikata, Mitsuru Yagi, Takashi Tsuji, Kota Watanabe, Suketaka Momoshima, Morio Matsumoto, Masaya Nakamura and Ken Ishii

OBJECTIVE

A number of studies have reported that surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors via the posterior approach can result in postoperative sagittal malalignment of the cervical spine; however, the risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in cervical spinal alignment after surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors in adults and to elucidate the risk factors for cervical spinal sagittal misalignment.

METHODS

Data for the period from April 2001 to December 2011 for all adults who had undergone surgery for cervical intramedullary spinal cord tumors at a single institution were retrospectively analyzed to determine the postoperative changes in cervical spine alignment. Patients younger than 20 years of age and those who required postoperative radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to tumor location: upper tumor (U) group, in which the central region of the tumor was above the C-5 level; and lower tumor (L) group, in which the central region of the tumor was at or below the C-5 level. Changes in alignment of the cervical spine were measured on plain lateral radiographs. Data on atrophy of the deep extensor muscles (DEMs), tumor location, detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process, the C2–7 angle before surgery, patient age at surgery, tumor histology, patient sex, tumor size, and number of laminae affected were reviewed for each patient, and the correlation of each of these factors with cervical spinal malalignment was evaluated using statistical analysis.

RESULTS

The 54 adults eligible for analysis had a mean age of 49.1 years. Ependymoma was the most common cervical intramedullary tumor (63.0%) in this series. In the tumor location U group, the kyphotic angle of the C2–7 spinal segments increased after surgery (−5.8° ± 2.8°). In contrast, in the L group, the C2–7 lordotic angle increased after surgery (6.4° ± 2.6°). In the univariate analysis, atrophy of the DEMs, detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process, and an upper cervical location of the tumor were identified as factors significantly correlated with the development of cervical spinal kyphosis after surgery. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed the following as risk factors for kyphotic change of the cervical spine after surgery: 1) atrophy of the DEMs after surgery (β = −0.54, p < 0.01), and 2) detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process (β = −0.37, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Atrophy of the DEMs after surgery and detachment of the DEMs from the C-2 spinous process are directly related to the risk of cervical spinal kyphosis after surgery for cervical intramedullary tumors in adults. Therefore, preservation of the DEMs, especially those attached to the C-2 spinous process, is important for the prevention of kyphotic malalignment of the cervical spine after surgery for intramedullary tumors.

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Bong Ju Moon, Justin S. Smith, Christopher P. Ames, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Frank Schwab, Morio Matsumoto, Jong Sam Baik and Yoon Ha

OBJECT

To identify the characteristics of cervical deformities in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the role of severity of PD in the development of cervical spine deformities, the authors investigated the prevalence of the cervical deformities, cervical kyphosis (CK), and cervical positive sagittal malalignment (CPSM) in patients with PD. They also analyzed the association of severity of cervical deformities with the stage of PD in the context of global sagittal spinopelvic alignment.

METHODS

This study was a prospective assessment of consecutively treated patients (n = 89) with PD. A control group of the age- and sex-matched patients was selected from patients with degenerative cervical spine disease but without PD. Clinical and demographic parameters including age, sex, duration of PD, and Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage were collected. Full-length standing radiographs were used to assess spinopelvic parameters. CK was defined as a C2–7 Cobb angle < 0°. CPSM was defined as C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 4 cm.

RESULTS

A significantly higher prevalence of CPSM (28% vs 1.1%, p < 0.001), but not CK (12% vs 10.1%, p = 0.635), was found in PD patients compared with control patients. Among patients with PD, those with CK were younger (62.1 vs 69.0 years, p = 0.013) and had longer duration of PD (56.4 vs 36.2 months, p = 0.034), but the severity of PD was not significantly different. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of CK was associated with younger age, higher mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis, and lower C7–S1 SVA. The patients with CPSM had significantly greater thoracic kyphosis (TK) (p < 0.001) and a trend toward more advanced H&Y stage (p = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that CPSM was associated with male sex, greater TK, and more advanced H&Y stage.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with PD have a significantly higher prevalence of CPSM compared with age- and sex-matched control patients with cervical degenerative disease but without PD. Among patients with PD, CK is not associated with the severity of PD but is associated with overall global sagittal malalignment. In contrast, the presence of CPSM is associated more with the severity of PD than it is with the presence of global sagittal malalignment. Collectively, these data suggest that the neuromuscular pathogenesis of PD may affect the development of CPSM more than of CK.

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Tomohiro Hikata, Kota Watanabe, Nobuyuki Fujita, Akio Iwanami, Naobumi Hosogane, Ken Ishii, Masaya Nakamura, Yoshiaki Toyama and Morio Matsumoto

OBJECT

The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ).

RESULTS

One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA < 50 mm), those with preoperative sagittal imbalance (Group B: SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA < 50 mm), patients with a postoperative SVA ≥ 50 mm (Group D) had significantly lower JOABPEQ scores, both preoperative and postoperative, for walking ability (preop: 36.6 ± 26.3 vs 22.7 ± 26.0, p = 0.038, respectively; postop: 71.1 ± 30.4 vs 42.5 ± 29.6, p < 0.001) and social functioning (preop: 38.7 ± 18.5 vs 30.2 ± 16.7, p = 0.045; postop: 67.0 ± 25.8 vs 49.6 ± 20.0, p = 0.001), as well as significantly higher postoperative RMDQ (4.9 ± 5.2 vs 7.9 ± 5.7, p = 0.015) and VAS scores for low-back pain (2.68 ± 2.69 vs 3.94 ± 2.59, p = 0.039).

CONCLUSIONS

Preoperative sagittal balance was not significantly correlated with clinical or HRQOL outcomes after decompression surgery in LCS patients without coronal imbalance. Decompression surgery improved the SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance after decompression surgery. Both clinical and HRQOL outcomes were negatively affected by postoperative residual sagittal imbalance.

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Jeffrey D. Coe, Alexander R. Vaccaro, Andrew T. Dailey, Rick C. Sasso, Steven C. Ludwig, James S. Harrop, Joseph R. Dettori, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Sanford E. Emery and Michael G. Fehlings

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Naobumi Hosogane, Kota Watanabe, Hitoshi Kono, Masashi Saito, Yoshiaki Toyama and Morio Matsumoto

Object

The authors undertook this study to evaluate curve progression, risk factors for curve progression, and outcomes after decompression surgery in patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis with minimal to moderate curvature.

Methods

Of 852 patients with lumbar canal stenosis treated by posterior decompression surgery, 50 patients had a lumbar curve greater than 10° at final follow-up. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to curve progression during the follow-up period: the P group (11 patients), with a curve progression of more than 5°, and the NP group (39 patients), with a curve progression of 5° or less. The authors compared preoperative parameters in these 2 groups to elucidate risk factors associated with curve progression and other surgical outcomes.

Results

The average lumbar curve progression in the total group of 50 patients was 3.4° ± 3.9° (range −2.0° to 22.0°). In the P group the average curve progression was 8.5°, and in the NP group it was 2.0°. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between curve progression and any of the potential risk factors evaluated (including curve magnitude, decompression method, and degenerative intervertebral disc changes). Spur formation, evaluated with the Nathan classification at the concave side of the curve, tended to be greater in the P group, although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference in revision surgery rate, and none of the patients required arthrodesis due to curve progression. Clinical outcomes, evaluated with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire and the Scoliosis Research Society 22-question questionnaire, were also similar in the 2 groups.

Conclusions

Surgical outcomes did not deteriorate in the P group. While curve progression after decompression surgery could not be predicted from the preoperative factors considered, spur formation at the concave side of the curve may be a candidate factor. The results of this study indicate that spinal fixation to halt deformity progression is not always necessary if the patient's pathological condition derives mainly from canal stenosis.

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Lawrence G. Lenke

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Soya Kawabata, Kota Watanabe, Naobumi Hosogane, Ken Ishii, Masaya Nakamura, Yoshiaki Toyama and Morio Matsumoto

Severe cervical kyphosis requiring surgical treatment is rare in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). When it occurs, however, dystrophic changes in the vertebrae make surgical correction and fusion of the deformity extremely difficult.

The authors report on 3 cases of severe cervical kyphosis associated with NF1 that were successfully treated with combined anterior and posterior correction and fusion. All patients underwent halo-gravity traction for approximately 1 month prior to surgery to correct the deformity gradually. Posterior correction and fusion were performed with segmental spinal instrumentation consisting of lateral mass screws, lamina screws, pedicle screws, and polyethylene tape for sublaminar wiring. Anterior spinal fusion was performed using a fibula strut to induce solid bone fusion. All patients used a halo vest for postoperative external fixation.

Preoperative CT scans showed dystrophic cervical spine changes, and MR images demonstrated extensive neurofibromas outside the cervical spine in all 3 patients. The preoperative kyphotic angles were as follows: Case 1, 140°; Case 2, 81°; and Case 3, 72°; after halo-gravity traction, the kyphosis angles improved to 50°, 55°, and 51°, respectively; and after surgery, they were 50°, 15°, and 27°, respectively. Solid bone union was observed in all patients at the latest follow-up. All three patients experienced postoperative complications consisting of superficial infection, severe pneumonia, and partial dislocation of the distal fibula graft after removing the halo vest, in one patient each.

Although dystrophic cervical vertebral changes in these patients with NF1 complicated the correction of severe cervical kyphosis, the use of preoperative halo-gravity traction, a combination of spinal instrumentations, an anterior strut bone graft, and postoperative halo-vest fixation made it possible to correct the kyphosis, maintain the correction, and achieve solid bone fusion.

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Masaya Nakamura, Kanehiro Fujiyoshi, Osahiko Tsuji, Tsunehiko Konomi, Naobumi Hosogane, Kota Watanabe, Takashi Tsuji, Ken Ishii, Suketaka Momoshima, Yoshiaki Toyama, Kazuhiro Chiba and Morio Matsumoto

Object

This study was conducted to determine whether postoperative changes in the fractional anisotropy (FA) value and diffusion tensor imaging of the cervical spinal cord can predict functional outcome for patients with cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM).

Methods

Twenty patients with CCM were treated by laminoplasty from 2008 to 2009. Both T2-weighted MRI and diffusion tensor imaging were performed before and after surgery. The FA values were analyzed and fiber tracking was performed. The fiber tract (FT) ratio was calculated according to the following formula: (number of fibers at the compressed level)/(number of fibers at the C-2 level) × 100%. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scoring system for cervical myelopathy was used to determine pre- and postoperative neurological status of the patients, and the Hirabayashi method was used to calculate the recovery rate.

Results

There was no significant difference in recovery rates between patients with and those without intramedullary high signal intensity on preoperative T2-weighted images. Substantial differences in FA value among spinal cord, bone, and CSF made it difficult to obtain a precise FA value for the compressed spinal cord. There was a significant correlation between the preoperative FT ratio and the recovery rate (p = 0.0006). A poor outcome (recovery rate < 40%) could be anticipated for CCM patients with preoperative FT ratios below 60%.

Conclusions

The preoperative FT ratio correlated significantly with the recovery rates in CCM patients. Preoperative diffusion tensor tractography can be a new prognostic predictor for neurological recovery in CCM patients after laminoplasty.

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Morio Matsumoto, Yoshiaki Toyama, Hirotaka Chikuda, Katsushi Takeshita, Tsuyoshi Kato, Shigeo Shindo, Kuniyoshi Abumi, Masahiko Takahata, Yutaka Nohara, Hiroshi Taneichi, Katsuro Tomita, Norio Kawahara, Shiro Imagama, Yukihiro Matsuyama, Masashi Yamazaki and Akihiko Okawa

Object

The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of fusion surgery in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine (T-OPLL) and to identify factors significantly related to surgical outcomes.

Methods

The study included 76 patients (34 men and 42 women with a mean age of 56.3 years) who underwent fusion surgery for T-OPLL at 7 spine centers during the 5-year period from 2003 to 2007. The authors evaluated the patient demographic data, underlying disease, preoperative comorbidities, history of spinal surgery, radiological findings, surgical methods, surgical outcomes, and complications. Surgical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score for thoracic myelopathy (11 points) and the recovery rate.

Results

The mean JOA scale score was 4.6 ± 2.1 points preoperatively and 7.7 ± 2.5 points at the time of the final follow-up examination, yielding a mean recovery rate of 45.4% ± 39.1%. The recovery rates by surgical method were 38.5% ± 37.8% for posterior decompression and fusion, 65.0% ± 35.6% for anterior decompression and fusion via an anterior approach, 28.8% ± 41.2% for anterior decompression via a posterior approach, and 57.5% ± 41.1% for circumferential decompression and fusion. The recovery rate was significantly higher in patients without diabetes mellitus (DM) than in those with DM. One or more complications were experienced by 31 patients (40.8%), including 20 patients with postoperative neurological deterioration, 7 with dural tears, 5 with epidural hematomas, 4 with respiratory complications, and 10 with other complications.

Conclusions

The outcomes of fusion surgery for T-OPLL were favorable. The absence of DM correlated with better outcomes. However, a high rate of complications was associated with the fusion surgery.