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Hideyuki Kano, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Kyung-Jae Park, Aditya Iyer, Huai-che Yang, Xiaomin Liu, Edward A. Monaco III, Ajay Niranjan and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

In this paper the authors' goal was to define the long-term benefits and risks of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) who underwent prior embolization.

Methods

Between 1987 and 2006, the authors performed Gamma Knife surgery in 996 patients with brain AVMs; 120 patients underwent embolization followed by SRS. In this series, 64 patients (53%) had at least one prior hemorrhage. The median number of embolizations varied from 1 to 5. The median target volume was 6.6 cm3 (range 0.2–26.3 cm3). The median margin dose was 18 Gy (range 13.5–25 Gy).

Results

After embolization, 25 patients (21%) developed symptomatic neurological deficits. The overall rates of total obliteration documented by either angiography or MRI were 35%, 53%, 55%, and 59% at 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Factors associated with a higher rate of AVM obliteration were smaller target volume, smaller maximum diameter, higher margin dose, timing of embolization during the most recent 10-year period (1997–2006), and lower Pollock-Flickinger score. Nine patients (8%) had a hemorrhage during the latency period, and 7 patients died of hemorrhage. The actuarial rates of AVM hemorrhage after SRS were 0.8%, 3.5%, 5.4%, 7.7%, and 7.7% at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The overall annual hemorrhage rate was 2.7%. Factors associated with a higher risk of hemorrhage after SRS were a larger target volume and a larger number of prior hemorrhages. Permanent neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects (AREs) developed in 3 patients (2.5%) after SRS, and 1 patient had delayed cyst formation 210 months after SRS. No patient died of AREs. A larger 12-Gy volume was associated with higher risk of symptomatic AREs. Using a case-control matched approach, the authors found that patients who underwent embolization prior to SRS had a lower rate of total obliteration (p = 0.028) than patients who had not undergone embolization.

Conclusions

In this 20-year experience, the authors found that prior embolization reduced the rate of total obliteration after SRS, and that the risks of hemorrhage during the latency period were not affected by prior embolization. For patients who underwent embolization to volumes smaller than 8 cm3, success was significantly improved. A margin dose of 18 Gy or more also improved success. In the future, the role of embolization after SRS should be explored.

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Ramesh Grandhi, Douglas Kondziolka, David Panczykowski, Edward A. Monaco III, Hideyuki Kano, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

To better establish the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in treating patients with 10 or more intracranial metastases, the authors assessed clinical outcomes and identified prognostic factors associated with survival and tumor control in patients who underwent radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX) unit.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed data in all patients who had undergone LGK PFX surgery to treat 10 or more brain metastases in a single session at the University of Pittsburgh. Posttreatment imaging studies were used to assess tumor response, and patient records were reviewed for clinical follow-up data. All data were collected by a neurosurgeon who had not participated in patient care.

Results

Sixty-one patients with 10 or more brain metastases underwent SRS for the treatment of 806 tumors (mean 13.2 lesions). Seven patients (11.5%) had no previous therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery was the sole prior treatment modality in 8 patients (13.1%), 22 (36.1%) underwent whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) only, and 16 (26.2%) had prior SRS and WBRT. The total treated tumor volume ranged from 0.14 to 40.21 cm3, and the median radiation dose to the tumor margin was 16 Gy. The median survival following SRS for 10 or more brain metastases was 4 months, with improved survival in patients with fewer than 14 brain metastases, a nonmelanomatous primary tumor, controlled systemic disease, a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score, and a lower recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Prior cerebral treatment did not influence survival. The median survival for a patient with fewer than 14 brain metastases, a nonmelanomatous primary tumor, and controlled systemic disease was 21.0 months. Sustained local tumor control was achieved in 81% of patients. Prior WBRT predicted the development of new adverse radiation effects.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery safely and effectively treats intracranial disease with a high rate of local control in patients with 10 or more brain metastases. In patients with fewer metastases, a nonmelanomatous primary lesion, controlled systemic disease, and a low RPA class, SRS may be most valuable. In selected patients, it can be considered as first-line treatment.

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Douglas Kondziolka

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Douglas Kondziolka

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Kyung-Jae Park, Douglas Kondziolka, Hideyuki Kano, Oren Berkowitz, Safee Faraz Ahmed, Xiaomin Liu, Ajay Niranjan, John C. Flickinger and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

Vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE) is an unusual cause of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The surgical options for patients with medically refractory pain include percutaneous or microsurgical rhizotomy and microvascular decompression (MVD). All such procedures can be technically challenging. This report evaluates the response to a minimally invasive procedure, Gamma Knife surgery (GKS), in patients with TN associated with severe vascular compression caused by VBE.

Methods

Twenty patients underwent GKS for medically refractory TN associated with VBE. The median patient age was 74 years (range 48–95 years). Prior surgical procedures had failed in 11 patients (55%). In 9 patients (45%), GKS was the first procedure they had undergone. The median target dose for GKS was 80 Gy (range 75–85 Gy). The median follow-up was 29 months (range 8–123 months) after GKS. The treatment outcomes were compared with 80 case-matched controls who underwent GKS for TN not associated with VBE.

Results

Intraoperative MR imaging or CT scanning revealed VBE that deformed the brainstem in 50% of patients. The trigeminal nerve was displaced in cephalad or lateral planes in 60%. In 4 patients (20%), the authors could identify only the distal cisternal component of the trigeminal nerve as it entered into the Meckel cave.

After GKS, 15 patients (75%) achieved initial pain relief that was adequate or better, with or without medication (Barrow Neurological Institute [BNI] pain scale, Grades I–IIIb). The median time until pain relief was 5 weeks (range 1 day–6 months). Twelve patients (60%) with initial pain relief reported recurrent pain between 3 and 43 months after GKS (median 12 months). Pain relief was maintained in 53% at 1 year, 38% at 2 years, and 10% at 5 years. Some degree of facial sensory dysfunction occurred in 10% of patients. Eventually, 14 (70%) of the 20 patients underwent an additional surgical procedure including repeat GKS, percutaneous procedure, or MVD at a median of 14 months (range 5–50 months) after the initial GKS. At the last follow-up, 15 patients (75%) had satisfactory pain control (BNI Grades I–IIIb), but 5 patients (25%) continued to have unsatisfactory pain control (BNI Grade IV or V). Compared with patients without VBE, patients with VBE were much less likely to have initial (p = 0.025) or lasting (p = 0.006) pain relief.

Conclusions

Pain control rates of GKS in patients with TN associated with VBE were inferior to those of patients without VBE. Multimodality surgical or medical management strategies were required in most patients with VBE.

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Arteriovenous malformations and radiosurgery

Douglas Kondziolka, Hideyuki Kano and L. Dade Lunsford

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Hideyuki Kano, L. Dade Lunsford, John C. Flickinger, Huai-che Yang, Thomas J. Flannery, Nasir R. Awan, Ajay Niranjan, Josef Novotny Jr. and Douglas Kondziolka

Object

The aim of this paper was to define the outcomes and risks of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for Spetzler-Martin Grade I and II arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

Between 1987 and 2006, the authors performed Gamma Knife surgery in 996 patients with brain AVMs, including 217 patients with AVMs classified as Spetzler-Martin Grade I or II. The median maximum diameter and target volumes were 1.9 cm (range 0.5–3.8 cm) and 2.3 cm3 (range 0.1–14.1 cm3), respectively. The median margin dose was 22 Gy (range 15–27 Gy).

Results

Arteriovenous malformation obliteration was confirmed by MR imaging in 148 patients and by angiography in 100 patients with a median follow-up of 64 months (range 6–247 months). The actuarial rates of total obliteration determined by angiography or MR imaging after 1 SRS procedure were 58%, 87%, 90%, and 93% at 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The median time to complete MR imaging–determined obliteration was 30 months. Factors associated with higher AVM obliteration rates were smaller AVM target volume, smaller maximum diameter, and greater marginal dose. Thirteen patients (6%) suffered hemorrhages during the latency period, and 6 patients died. Cumulative rates of AVM hemorrhage 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 years after SRS were 3.7%, 4.2%, 4.2%, 5.0%, and 6.1%, respectively. This corresponded to rates of annual bleeding risk of 3.7%, 0.3%, and 0.2% for Years 0–1, 1–5, and 5–10, respectively, after SRS. The presence of a coexisting aneurysm proximal to the AVM correlated with a significantly higher hemorrhage risk. Temporary symptomatic adverse radiation effects developed in 5 patients (2.3%) after SRS, and 2 patients (1%) developed delayed cysts.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a gradually effective and relatively safe option for patients with smaller volume Spetzler-Martin Grade I or II AVMs who decline initial resection. Hemorrhage after obliteration did not occur in this series. Patients remain at risk for a bleeding event during the latency interval until obliteration occurs. Patients with aneurysms and an AVM warrant more aggressive surgical or endovascular treatment to reduce the risk of a hemorrhage in the latency period after SRS.

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Hideyuki Kano, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Huai-che Yang, Thomas J. Flannery, Nasir R. Awan, Ajay Niranjan, Josef Novotny Jr. and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

The authors conducted a study to define the long-term outcomes and risks of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for pediatric arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

Between 1987 and 2006, the authors performed Gamma Knife surgery in 996 patients with brain AVMs; 135 patients were younger than 18 years of age. The median maximum diameter and target volumes were 2.0 cm (range 0.6–5.2 cm) and 2.5 cm3 (range 0.1–17.5 cm3), respectively. The median margin dose was 20 Gy (range 15–25 Gy).

Results

The actuarial rates of total obliteration documented by angiography or MR imaging at 71.3 months (range 6–264 months) were 45%, 64%, 67%, and 72% at 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The median time to complete angiographically documented obliteration was 48.9 months. Of 81 patients with 4 or more years of follow-up, 57 patients (70%) had total obliteration documented by angiography. Factors associated with a higher rate of documented AVM obliteration were smaller AVM target volume, smaller maximum diameter, and larger margin dose. In 8 patients (6%) a hemorrhage occurred during the latency interval, and 1 patient died. The rates of AVM hemorrhage after SRS were 0%, 1.6%, 2.4%, 5.5%, and 10.0% at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The overall annual hemorrhage rate was 1.8%. Larger volume AVMs were associated with a significantly higher risk of hemorrhage after SRS. Permanent neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects developed in 2 patients (1.5%) after SRS, and in 1 patient (0.7%) delayed cyst formation occurred.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a gradually effective and relatively safe management option for pediatric patients in whom surgery is considered to pose excessive risks. Although hemorrhage after AVM obliteration did not occur in the present series, patients remain at risk during the latency interval until obliteration is complete. The best candidates for SRS are pediatric patients with smaller volume AVMs located in critical brain regions.

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Hideyuki Kano, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Huai-che Yang, Thomas J. Flannery, Nasir R. Awan, Ajay Niranjan, Josef Novotny Jr. and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and risks of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for incompletely obliterated cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

Between 1987 and 2006, Gamma Knife surgery was performed in 996 patients with AVMs. During this period, repeat SRS was performed in 105 patients who had incompletely obliterated AVMs at a median of 40.9 months after initial SRS (range 27.5–139 months). The median AVM target volume was 6.4 cm3 (range 0.2–26.3 cm3) at initial SRS but was reduced to 2.3 cm3 (range 0.1–18.2 cm3) at the time of the second procedure. The median margin dose at both initial SRS and repeat SRS was 18 Gy.

Results

The actuarial rate of total obliteration by angiography or MR imaging after repeat SRS was 35%, 68%, 77%, and 80% at 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The median time to complete angiographic or MR imaging obliteration after repeat SRS was 39 months. Factors associated with a higher rate of AVM obliteration were smaller residual AVM target volume (p = 0.038) and a volume reduction of 50% or more after the initial procedure (p = 0.014). Seven patients (7%) had a hemorrhage in the interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS. Seventeen patients (16%) had hemorrhage after repeat SRS and 6 patients died. The cumulative actuarial rates of new AVM hemorrhage after repeat SRS were 1.9%, 8.1%, 10.1%, 10.1%, and 22.4% at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively, which translate to annual hemorrhage rates of 4.05% and 1.79% of patients developing new post–repeat-SRS hemorrhages per year for Years 0–2 and 2–10 following repeat SRS. Factors associated with a higher risk of hemorrhage after repeat SRS were a greater number of prior hemorrhages (p = 0.008), larger AVM target volume at initial SRS (p = 0.010), larger target volume at repeat SRS (p = 0.002), initial AVM volume reduction less than 50% (p = 0.019), and a higher Pollock-Flickinger score (p = 0.010). Symptomatic adverse radiation effects developed in 5 patients (4.8%) after initial SRS and in 10 patients (9.5%) after repeat SRS. Prior embolization (p = 0.022) and a higher Spetzler-Martin grade (p = 0.004) were significantly associated with higher rates of adverse radiation effects after repeat SRS. Delayed cyst formation occurred in 5 patients (4.8%) at a median of 108 months after repeat SRS (range 47–184 months).

Conclusions

Repeat SRS for incompletely obliterated AVMs increases the eventual obliteration rate. Hemorrhage after obliteration did not occur in this series. The best results for patients with incompletely obliterated AVMs were seen in patients with a smaller residual nidus volume and no prior hemorrhages.

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Hideyuki Kano, Douglas Kondziolka, John C. Flickinger, Huai-che Yang, Thomas J. Flannery, Ajay Niranjan, Josef Novotny Jr. and L. Dade Lunsford

Object

The authors conducted a study to define the long-term outcomes and risks of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the basal ganglia and thalamus.

Methods

Between 1987 and 2006, the authors performed Gamma Knife surgery in 996 patients with brain AVMs; 56 patients had AVMs of the basal ganglia and 77 had AVMs of the thalamus. In this series, 113 (85%) of 133 patients had a prior hemorrhage. The median target volume was 2.7 cm3 (range 0.1–20.7 cm3) and the median margin dose was 20 Gy (range 15–25 Gy).

Results

Obliteration of the AVM eventually was documented on MR imaging in 78 patients and on angiography in 63 patients in a median follow-up period of 61 months (range 2–265 months). The actuarial rates documenting total obliteration after radiosurgery were 57%, 70%, 72%, and 72% at 3, 4, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Factors associated with a higher rate of AVM obliteration included AVMs located in the basal ganglia, a smaller target volume, a smaller maximum diameter, and a higher margin dose. Fifteen (11%) of 133 patients suffered a hemorrhage during the latency period and 7 patients died. The rate of post-SRS AVM hemorrhage was 4.5%, 6.2%, 9.0%, 11.2%, and 15.4% at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The overall annual hemorrhage rate was 4.7%. When 5 patients with 7 hemorrhages occurring earlier than 6 months after SRS were removed from this analysis, the annual hemorrhage rate decreased to 2.7%. Larger volume AVMs had a higher risk of hemorrhage after SRS. Permanent neurological deficits due to adverse radiation effects (AREs) developed in 6 patients (4.5%), and in 1 patient a delayed cyst developed 56 months after SRS. No patient died of AREs. Factors associated with a higher risk of symptomatic AREs were larger target volume, larger maximum diameter, lower margin dose, and a higher Pollock-Flickinger score.

Conclusions

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a gradually effective and relatively safe management option for deep-seated AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Although hemorrhage after obliteration did not occur in the present series, patients remain at risk during the latency interval between SRS and obliteration. The best candidates for SRS are patients with smaller volume AVMs located in the basal ganglia.