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David G. Kline and George J. Hayes

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David G. Kline, George J. Hayes and Arthur S. Morse

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A Comparative Study of Response of Species to Peripheral-Nerve Injury

II. Crush and Severance with Primary Suture

David G. Kline, George J. Hayes and Arthur S. Morse

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David G. Kline, Earl R. Hackett and Peter R. May

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Hector J. LeBlanc, Luther W. Gray and David G. Kline

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David G. Kline and Hector J. Leblanc

✓ The successful treatment of a civilian gunshot wound of the vermis and pons is described. A large missile fragment was removed from a depth of 2 cm within the pons at the level of the facial colliculus. Despite initial coma and subsequent irregular respiration with sleep apnea, the patient survived. Neurological, radiographic, and operative findings are correlated with the anatomy of the pons.

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Joseph Nadell and David G. Kline

✓ Instead of discarding bone as in past practice with depressed skull fractures, fragments were soaked in Betadine, trimmed, reinserted into the skull defect, and covered with flaps of pericranium, muscle, or fascia. Of the 110 patients who had bone replaced, 65 had frontal fractures, which in 33 involved the frontal sinus, cribriform plate, or orbital rim. Fractures involving sinuses were treated by exenterating the sinus and packing it with muscle. The frontal and orbital rim region were reconstructed whenever possible with a mosaic of replaced bone. There were no deaths due to the minimal complications from the procedure. Despite severely macerated, contaminated, and in several instances, infected scalp wounds, most bone fragments have survived, and cranial defects have gradually filled with new bone. The authors believe that immediate bone replacement for depressed frontal fractures with or without orbital, sinus, or cribriform plate involvement is both practical and safe.

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Raymond E. Dahl and David G. Kline

✓ Arteriovenous malformations located within cerebral parenchyma are usually supplied by intracranial vessels. An extracranial blood supply to these lesions is rare. The authors report their experience with two such cases and discuss the 21 comparable reports.