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Mazin Elsarrag, Sauson Soldozy, Parantap Patel, Pedro Norat, Jennifer D. Sokolowski, Min S. Park, Petr Tvrdik and M. Yashar S. Kalani

OBJECTIVE

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is a multidimensional approach to improving the care of surgical patients using subspecialty- and procedure-specific evidence-based protocols. The literature provides evidence of the benefits of ERAS implementation, which include expedited functional recovery, decreased postoperative morbidity, reduced costs, and improved subjective patient experience. Although extensively examined in other surgical areas, ERAS principles have been applied to spine surgery only in recent years. The authors examine studies investigating the application of ERAS programs to patients undergoing spine surgery.

METHODS

The authors conducted a systematic review of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases up to November 20, 2018.

RESULTS

Twenty full-text articles were included in the qualitative analysis. The majority of studies were retrospective reviews of nonrandomized data sets or qualitative investigations lacking formal control groups; there was 1 protocol for a future randomized controlled trial. Most studies demonstrated reduced lengths of stay and no increase in rates of readmissions or complications after introduction of an ERAS pathway.

CONCLUSIONS

These introductory studies demonstrate the potential of ERAS protocols, when applied to spine procedures, to reduce lengths of stay, accelerate return of function, minimize postoperative pain, and save costs.

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Daniel M. S. Raper, Nasser Mohammed, M. Yashar S. Kalani and Min S. Park

The preferred method for treating complex dural arteriovenous fistulae of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses is via endovascular, transarterial embolization using liquid embolysate. However, this treatment approach mandates access to distal dural feeding arteries that can be technically challenging by standard endovascular approaches. This video describes a left temporal craniotomy for direct stick microcatheterization of an endovascularly inaccessible distal posterior division of the middle meningeal artery for embolization of a complex left temporal dural arteriovenous fistula. The case was performed in the hybrid operative suite with biplane intraoperative angiography. Technical considerations, operative nuances, and outcomes are reviewed.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Dnd4yHgaKcQ.

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Sauson Soldozy, John S. Costello, Pedro Norat, Jennifer D. Sokolowski, Kamron Soldozy, Min S. Park, Petr Tvrdik and M. Yashar S. Kalani

While the majority of cerebral revascularization advancements were made in the last century, it is worth noting the humble beginnings of vascular surgery throughout history to appreciate its progression and application to neurovascular pathology in the modern era. Nearly 5000 years of basic human inquiry into the vasculature and its role in neurological disease has resulted in the complex neurosurgical procedures used today to save and improve lives. This paper explores the story of the extracranial-intracranial approach to cerebral revascularization.

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M. Yashar S. Kalani, Michael T. Lawton and Robert F. Spetzler

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Francesco Prada, Massimiliano Del Bene, Giovanni Mauri, Massimo Lamperti, Davide Vailati, Carla Richetta, Marco Saini, Davide Santuari, M. Yashar S. Kalani and Francesco DiMeco

The relevance of the cerebral venous system is often underestimated during neurosurgical procedures. Damage to this draining system can have catastrophic implications for the patient. Surgical decision-making and planning must consider each component of the venous compartment, from the medullary draining vein to the dural sinuses and extracranial veins. Intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) permits the real-time study of venous compartments using different modalities, thus allowing complete characterization of their anatomical and functional features. The B-mode (brightness mode) offers a high-resolution anatomical representation of veins and their relationships with lesions. Doppler modalities (color, power, spectral) allow the study of blood flow and identification of vessels to distinguish their functional characteristics. Contrast-enhanced US allows one to perform real-time angiosonography showing both the functional and the anatomical aspects of vessels.

In this technical report, the authors demonstrate the different applications of multimodal ioUS in neurosurgery for identifying the anatomical and functional characteristics of the venous compartment. They discuss the general principles and technical nuances of ioUS and analyze their potential implications for the study of various venous districts during neurosurgical procedures.

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Tim E. Darsaut, Robert Fahed, R. Loch Macdonald, Adam S. Arthur, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Fuat Arikan, Daniel Roy, Alain Weill, Alain Bilocq, Jeremy L. Rempel, Michael M. Chow, Robert A. Ashforth, J. Max Findlay, Luis H. Castro-Afonso, Miguel Chagnon, Guylaine Gevry and Jean Raymond

OBJECTIVE

Ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) can be managed surgically or endovascularly. In this study, the authors aimed to measure the interobserver agreement in selecting the best management option for various patients with an RIA.

METHODS

The authors constructed an electronic portfolio of 42 cases of RIA in which an angiographic image along with a brief clinical vignette for each patient were displayed. Undisclosed to the responders was that the RIAs had been categorized as International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) (small, anterior-circulation, non–middle cerebral artery location, n = 18) and non-ISAT (n = 22) aneurysms; the non-ISAT group also included 2 basilar apex aneurysms for which a high number of endovascular choices was expected. The portfolio was sent to 132 clinicians who manage patients with RIAs and circulated to members of an American surgical association. Judges were asked to choose between surgical and endovascular management, to indicate their level of confidence in the choice of treatment on a quantitative 0–10 scale, and to determine whether they would include the patient in a randomized trial in which both treatments are compared. Eleven clinicians were asked to respond twice at least 1 month apart. Responses were analyzed using kappa statistics.

RESULTS

Eighty-five clinicians (58 cerebrovascular surgeons, 21 interventional neuroradiologists, and 6 interventional neurologists) answered the questionnaire. Overall, endovascular management was chosen more frequently (n = 2136 [59.8%] of 3570 answers). The proportions of decisions to clip were significantly higher for non-ISAT (50.8%) than for ISAT (26.2%) aneurysms (p = 0.0003). Interjudge agreement was only fair (kappa 0.210, 95% CI 0.158–0.276) for all cases and judges, despite high confidence levels (mean score > 8 for all cases). Agreement was no better within subgroups of clinicians with the same specialty, years of experience, or location of practice or across capability groups (ability to clip or coil, or both). When agreement was defined as > 80% of responders choosing the same option, agreement occurred for only 7 of 40 cases, all of which were ISAT aneurysms, for which coiling was preferred.

CONCLUSIONS

Agreement between clinicians regarding the best management option was infrequent but centered around coiling for some ISAT aneurysms. Surgical clipping was chosen more frequently for non-ISAT aneurysms than for ISAT aneurysms. Patients with such an aneurysm might be candidates for inclusion in randomized trials.

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Davis G. Taylor, Ching-Jen Chen, Thomas J. Buell, Min S. Park, J. Javier Provencio and M. Yashar S. Kalani

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Nam Yoon, Aatman Shah, William T. Couldwell, M. Yashar S. Kalani and Min S. Park

Skull base meningiomas are technically challenging tumors to treat because of their deep vascular supply that can preclude early devascularization during resection. Preoperative embolization of these arterial feeders is thought to decrease blood loss and facilitate resection; however, given the complex and varied anatomy of these skull base lesions, preoperative embolization is not without risk. It is essential for both endovascular and skull base neurosurgeons to understand these risks in light of the potential benefits. The authors review the vascular anatomy of skull base meningiomas, indications for preoperative devascularization, endovascular techniques, and published results regarding embolization of these lesions.

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Corey T. Walker, M. Yashar S. Kalani, Mark E. Oppenlander, Jakub Godzik, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Robert J. Standerfer and Nicholas Theodore

OBJECTIVE

The authors report a novel paradigm for resection of the disc or dural complex to treat giant calcified transdural herniated thoracic discs, and they describe a technique for the repair of dural defects. These herniated thoracic discs are uncommon, complicated lesions that often require a multidisciplinary team for effective treatment. The intradural component must be removed to effectively decompress the spinal cord. The opening of the friable dura mater, which frequently adheres to the extradural component of the disc, can result in large defects and difficult-to-manage CSF leaks.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective study of the technique and outcomes in patients with a transdural herniated disc treated at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center within a 4-year period between 2012 and 2015.

RESULTS

During the study period, 7 patients (mean age 56.1 years) presented to the department of neurosurgery with clinical symptoms consistent with myeloradiculopathy. In all cases, 2-level corpectomies of the involved levels were combined with circumferential resection of the dura and complete decompression of the spinal cord. The dural defect was repaired with an onlay dural patch, and a large piece of AlloDerm (LifeCell Corp) graft was sewn to close the pleural defect. Every patient had a perioperative lumbar drain placed for CSF diversion. No patient suffered neurological decline related to the surgery, and 3 patients experienced clinically significant improvement in function. Two patients developed an early postoperative CSF leak that required operative revision to oversew the defects.

CONCLUSIONS

This novel technique for decompression of the spinal cord by dural resection for the removal of giant calcified transdural herniated thoracic discs is safe and results in excellent decompression of the spinal cord. The technique becomes necessary when primary repair of the dura is not possible, and it can be used in cases in which the resection of pathology includes the dura.

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Adeel Ilyas, Ching-Jen Chen, Dale Ding, Andrew Romeo, Thomas J. Buell, Tony R. Wang, M. Yashar S. Kalani and Min S. Park

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and a significant source of long-term morbidity. Unfortunately, a substantial number of stroke patients either are ineligible or do not significantly benefit from contemporary medical and interventional therapies. To address this void, investigators recently made technological advances to render transcranial MR-guided, high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU) sonolysis a potential therapeutic option for both acute ischemic stroke (AIS)—as an alternative for patients with emergent large-vessel occlusion (ELVO) who are ineligible for endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) or as salvage therapy for patients in whom EMT fails—and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)—as a neoadjuvant means of clot lysis prior to surgical evacuation. Herein, the authors review the technological principles behind MRg-HIFU sonolysis, its results in in vitro and in vivo stroke models, and its potential clinical applications. As a noninvasive transcranial technique that affords rapid clot lysis, MRg-HIFU thrombolysis may develop into a therapeutic option for patients with AIS or ICH. However, additional studies of transcranial MRg-HIFU are necessary to ascertain the merit of this treatment approach for thrombolysis in both AIS and ICH, as well as its technical limitations and risks.