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Ali O. Jamshidi, André Beer-Furlan, Daniel M. Prevedello, Ronald Sahyouni, Mohamed A. Elzoghby, Mina G. Safain, Ricardo L. Carrau, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward R. Laws

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach has been proposed as a primary surgical strategy for select craniopharyngiomas. However, those tumors that arise from the sella have not been classified with the other craniopharyngioma subtypes in terms of surgical nuances, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcomes. The authors describe their experience with a select subtype of craniopharyngioma arising within the sella subjacent to the diaphragma sellae and refer to these tumors as type 0.

METHODS

After obtaining IRB approval, three institutions retrospectively reviewed their data collected from 2005 to 2017. Patients eligible for inclusion in the study were those who had tumors that originated from the sella inferior to the diaphragma sellae. Demographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and follow-up data were examined and analyzed.

RESULTS

Twenty-eight patients (average age 19.3 years, range 3–60 years) were included in this study. Sixteen patients (57%) were younger than 18 years of age. All patients had characteristic imaging features of an expanded sella. Seventy-five percent of the patients presented with some form of visual field deficit (89% had radiographic optic apparatus compression) and 39% with hypopituitarism. The average maximal tumor diameter in the axial, coronal, or sagittal plane was 3.1 cm. Gross-total resection was achieved in 82% of the patients. Twenty-one percent of patients experienced an iatrogenic complication, and there were only two cases (7%) of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Only two patients (7%) required the use of a nasoseptal flap as part of their original reconstruction. Pathology was uniformly the adamantinomatous subtype. Postoperative objective visual outcomes were improved in 71% of the patients with visual symptoms or visual field deficits on presentation and stable in 24%. Mean follow-up was 45.1 months (range 3–120 months) with an 18% recurrence rate at a mean of 44.4 months (range 10–84 months). One patient was lost to follow-up. Thirty-six percent of patients received postoperative radiation to treat recurrence or residual tumor. Endocrine data are also presented.

CONCLUSIONS

Craniopharyngiomas that originate within the sella below the diaphragma sellae are a select subtype characterized by 1) an enlarged sella, 2) an intact diaphragma sellae at surgery, and 3) an adamantinomatous pathology. These tumors can be treated transnasally without the absolute need for neurovascular flap reconstruction, as there is a low risk of CSF leakage.

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Winson S. Ho and John A. Jane Jr.

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder that causes bone fragility and deformity. Neurological manifestations, including macrocephaly and hydrocephalus, have been reported. Increased vascular fragility or bleeding diathesis also predisposes OI patients to intracranial hemorrhage. The development of chronic subdural fluid collections or hydrocephalus may require CSF diversion. The authors report a previously unrecognized complication of CSF diversion in a patient with OI, that is, a delayed severe cranial deformity, presumably due to over-shunting. In addition to the cosmetic concern, the deformity caused severe headaches and tenderness. The patient underwent craniectomy and titanium mesh cranioplasty, which resulted in the complete resolution of symptoms. This report raises the possibility that over-shunting in patients with OI could predispose to the formation of cranial deformity requiring surgical intervention.

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Alexandra M. Giantini Larsen, David J. Cote, Hasan A. Zaidi, Wenya Linda Bi, Paul J. Schmitt, J. Bryan Iorgulescu, Michael B. Miller, Timothy R. Smith, M. Beatriz Lopes, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward R. Laws Jr.

OBJECTIVE

The authors report the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of 6 cases of spindle cell oncocytoma (SCO) in an effort to guide clinical diagnosis and management of these uncommon lesions.

METHODS

This study is a retrospective review of cases involving adult patients who underwent resection of pituitary lesions at the authors’ institutions between January 2000 and October 2017. The authors identified patients with histopathological confirmation of SCO and collected clinical data, including preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative management, complications, and outcomes.

RESULTS

Six patients with SCO were identified. Clinical findings at initial presentation included visual disturbances, dizziness, and headache. All patients underwent resection. Four resections were initially performed by the transsphenoidal approach, and 2 resections were performed by craniotomy at an outside institution with subsequent transsphenoidal reoperations. Neither necrosis nor increased mitotic activity was seen in the tumor samples. All samples stained positive for S100 protein and thyroid transcription factor 1 and negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein and pituitary hormones. Five of the samples stained positive for epithelial membrane antigen. The average MIB-1 index was 8.3% (range 2–17). Postoperatively, 3 of the 6 patients received further treatment for progression of residual tumor or for recurrence, 2 have stable residual tumor, and 1 has had no recurrence after gross-total resection. Two patients developed postoperative complications of transient sixth cranial nerve palsy and diplopia. There were no other complications.

CONCLUSIONS

SCO poses both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. These tumors are often initially misdiagnosed as nonfunctional pituitary adenomas because of their sellar location and nonspecific symptomatology. Postoperatively, SCO must also be distinguished from other neoplasms of the posterior pituitary gland through histopathological examination. Resection of SCO can be challenging, given its highly vascular and adherent nature. Long-term follow-up is critical, as the tumor is associated with higher recurrence and progression rates compared to other benign neoplasms of the sella.

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I. Jonathan Pomeraniec, Hideyuki Kano, Zhiyuan Xu, Brandon Nguyen, Zaid A. Siddiqui, Danilo Silva, Mayur Sharma, Hesham Radwan, Jonathan A. Cohen, Robert F. Dallapiazza, Christian Iorio-Morin, Amparo Wolf, John A. Jane Jr., Inga S. Grills, David Mathieu, Douglas Kondziolka, Cheng-Chia Lee, Chih-Chun Wu, Christopher P. Cifarelli, Tomas Chytka, Gene H. Barnett, L. Dade Lunsford and Jason P. Sheehan

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is frequently used to treat residual or recurrent nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas. There is no consensus as to whether GKRS should be used early after surgery or if radiosurgery should be withheld until there is evidence of imaging-defined progression of tumor. Given the high incidence of adenoma progression after subtotal resection over time, the present study intended to evaluate the effect of timing of radiosurgery on outcome.

METHODS

This is a multicenter retrospective review of patients with nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas who underwent transsphenoidal surgery followed by GKRS from 1987 to 2015 at 9 institutions affiliated with the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation. Patients were matched by adenoma and radiosurgical parameters and stratified based on the interval between last resection and radiosurgery. Operative results, imaging data, and clinical outcomes were compared across groups following early (≤ 6 months after resection) or late (> 6 months after resection) radiosurgery.

RESULTS

After matching, 222 patients met the authors’ study criteria (from an initial collection of 496 patients) and were grouped based on early (n = 111) or late (n = 111) GKRS following transsphenoidal surgery. There was a greater risk of tumor progression after GKRS (p = 0.013) and residual tumor (p = 0.038) in the late radiosurgical group over a median imaging follow-up period of 68.5 months. No significant difference in the occurrence of post-GKRS endocrinopathy was observed (p = 0.68). Thirty percent of patients without endocrinopathy in the early cohort developed new endocrinopathies during the follow-up period versus 27% in the late cohort (p = 0.84). Fourteen percent of the patients in the early group and 25% of the patients in the late group experienced the resolution of endocrine dysfunction after original presentation (p = 0.32).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, early GKRS was associated with a lower risk of radiological progression of subtotally resected nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenomas compared with expectant management followed by late radiosurgery. Delaying radiosurgery may increase patient risk for long-term adenoma progression. The timing of radiosurgery does not appear to significantly affect the rate of delayed endocrinopathy.

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Toshihiro Ogiwara, Alhusain Nagm and Kazuhiro Hongo

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Panagiotis Mastorakos, Davis G. Taylor, Ching-Jen Chen, Thomas Buell, Joseph H. Donahue and John A. Jane Jr.

OBJECTIVE

Cavernous sinus invasion (CSI) in Cushing’s disease (CD) negatively affects the probability of complete resection, biochemical cure, and need for adjuvant therapy. However, the prediction of CSI based on MRI findings has been inconsistent and variable. Among macroadenomas, the Knosp classification is the most widely utilized radiographic predictor of CSI, but its accuracy in predicting CSI and the probability of gross-total resection is limited in the setting of microadenomas or Knosp grade 0–2 macroadenomas. The authors noticed that the presence of a triangular shape of adenomas adjacent to the cavernous sinus on coronal MR images is frequently associated with CSI. The authors aimed to determine the correlation of this radiographic finding (“sail sign” [SS]) with CSI.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients with a pituitary lesion < 20 mm and a biochemical diagnosis of CD treated with endoscopic or microscopic transsphenoidal resection from November 2007 to May 2017. Overall 185 patients with CD were identified: 27 were excluded for negative preoperative imaging, 32 for lacking tumors adjacent to the sinus, 7 for Knosp grade 3 or higher, and 4 for inadequate intraoperative assessment of the CSI. Following application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 115 cases were available for statistical analysis. Intraoperative CSI was prospectively evaluated at the time of surgery by one of two neurosurgical attending surgeons, and MRI data were evaluated retrospectively by a neurosurgical resident and attending neuroradiologist blinded to the intraoperative results.

RESULTS

A positive SS was identified in 23 patients (20%). Among patients with positive SS, 91% demonstrated CSI compared to 10% without an SS (p < 0.001). Using the SS as a predictor of CSI provided a sensitivity of 0.7 and a specificity of 0.98, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.91 and a negative predictive value of 0.9. Among patients with positive SS, 30% did not achieve immediate postoperative remission, compared to 3.3% of patients without an SS (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The presence of a positive SS among Cushing’s adenomas adjacent to the CS provides strong PPV, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio for the prediction of CSI. This can be a useful tool for preoperative planning and for predicting the likelihood of long-term biochemical remission and the need for adjuvant radiosurgery.

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Davis G. Taylor and John A. Jane Jr.

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Yuval Grober, Hagit Grober, Max Wintermark, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward H. Oldfield

OBJECTIVE

Many centers use conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DMRI) sequences in patients with Cushing's disease. The authors assessed the utility of the 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination, a spoiled-gradient echo 3D T1 sequence (SGE) characterized by superior soft tissue contrast and improved resolution, compared with DMRI and conventional MRI (CMRI) for detecting microadenomas in patients with Cushing's disease.

METHODS

This study was a blinded assessment of pituitary MRI in patients with proven Cushing's disease. Fifty-seven patients who had undergone surgery for Cushing's disease (10 male, 47 female; age range 13–69 years), whose surgical findings were considered to represent a microadenoma, and who had been examined with all 3 imaging techniques were included. Thus, selection emphasized patients with prior negative or equivocal MRI on referral. The MRI annotations were anonymized and 4 separate imaging sets were independently read by 3 blinded, experienced clinicians: a neuroradiologist and 2 pituitary surgeons.

RESULTS

Forty-eight surgical specimens contained an adenoma (46 ACTH-staining adenomas, 1 prolactinoma, and 1 nonfunctioning microadenoma). DMRI detected 5 adenomas that were not evident on CMRI, SGE detected 8 adenomas not evident on CMRI, including 3 that were not evident on DMRI. One adenoma was detected on DMRI that was not detected on SGE. McNemar's test for efficacy between the different MRI sets for tumor detection showed that the addition of SGE to CMRI increased the number of tumors detected from 18 to 26 (p = 0.02) based on agreement of at least 2 of 3 readers.

CONCLUSIONS

SGE shows higher sensitivity than DMRI for detecting and localizing pituitary microadenomas, although rarely an adenoma is detected exclusively by DMRI. SGE should be part of the standard MRI protocol for patients with Cushing's disease.

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Matthew J. Shepard, Mohamed A. Elzoghby, Erin N. Kiehna, Spencer C. Payne and John A. Jane Jr.

OBJECTIVE

Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs) are sellar lesions that are commonly encountered in adults but infrequently diagnosed in the pediatric population. As a result, the optimal management of pediatric RCCs remains a subject of controversy. Only 2 prior surgical series have been published on pediatric RCCs and no study has compared the presentation and outcomes of surgically versus conservatively managed cases. The authors therefore performed a comparative analysis of pediatric cases of RCC in which patients were treated with surgery or managed in a conservative manner.

METHODS

All cases involving pediatric patients diagnosed with an RCC at the University of Virginia between 2000 and 2016 were included in this study. Patient medical records, operative notes, and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. Patients who developed visual field deficits, radiographic evidence of chiasmal compression, or medically refractory headaches were considered candidates for surgical intervention. All patients who were selected for surgery underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach with cyst fenestration.

RESULTS

A total of 24 pediatric patients were diagnosed with an RCC over a 16-year period. Seven patients ultimately underwent transsphenoidal cyst fenestration, and 17 were managed conservatively. The patients’ age at diagnosis, cyst size, and pituitary function at the time of RCC diagnosis were similar in the conservatively and surgically managed cohorts. At diagnosis, 19 of 24 patients endorsed headaches that led to neuroimaging. All patients in the surgical cohort endorsed severe headaches at diagnosis compared with 71% in the conservative group. For the 7 patients treated with surgery, complete cyst evacuation was achieved in 86% of cases. Transient postoperative endocrinopathy occurred in 4 (57%) of 7 surgically treated individuals and resolved in all cases. In the conservative cohort, 1 patient developed a delayed pituitary-related endocrinopathy. Headache resolution occurred in 5 (71%) of the 7 patients who underwent surgery and 7 (58%) of the 12 who were treated without surgery. Cyst recurrence was documented in 1 individual in the surgical cohort who underwent a subtotal cyst fenestration that ultimately required re-intervention. In the conservative cohort, spontaneous cyst shrinkage occurred in 35% of patients with a median time to regression of 23.5 months.

CONCLUSIONS

Pediatric RCCs are benign sellar lesions that often present with headaches. While cyst fenestration mitigates headaches in most patients, the majority of conservatively managed pediatric patients with RCCs will have spontaneous headache resolution. Furthermore, spontaneous RCC regression occurs in a substantial number of individuals. Thus, in the absence of optic compression, visual field deficit, or diagnostic uncertainty, many pediatric cases of RCC can be managed conservatively.

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Davis G. Taylor, John A. Jane Jr. and Edward H. Oldfield

OBJECTIVE

Extracapsular resection of pituitary microadenomas improves remission rates, but the application of pseudocapsular techniques for macroadenomas has not been well described. In larger tumors, the extremely thin, compressed normal gland or its complete absence along the tumor’s anterior surface limits the application of the traditional pseudocapsular technique that can be used for microadenomas. However, in the authors’ experience, the interface between the pseudocapsule at the posterior margin of the adenoma and the compressed normal gland behind it is universally present, providing a surgical dissection plane. In mid-2010, the authors began using a new surgical technique to identify and use this interface for the resection of larger macroadenomas, a technique that can be used with the microscope or the endoscope.

METHODS

The authors performed a cohort study using prospectively collected preoperative imaging reports and operative details and retrospectively reviewed postoperative images and clinical follow-up of patients with a pituitary macroadenoma 20–40 mm in maximum diameter undergoing microscopic transsphenoidal resection. Since dissection of the tumor capsule only pertains to encapsulated tumor within the sella and not to tumor invading the cavernous sinus, assessment of tumor removal of noninvasive tumors emphasized the entire tumor, while that of invasive tumors emphasized the intrasellar component only. The incidence of residual tumor on postoperative imaging, new-onset endocrinopathy, and recovery of preoperative pituitary deficits was compared between patients who underwent surgery before (Group A) and after (Group B) implementation of the new technique.

RESULTS

There were 34 consecutive patients in Group A and 74 consecutive patients in Group B. Tumors in 18 (53%) Group A and 40 (54%) Group B patients had no evidence of cavernous sinus invasion on MRI. Use of the posterior pseudocapsule technique reduced the incidence of intrasellar residual tumor on postoperative MRI for tumors without cavernous sinus invasion (39% [Group A] vs 10%, p < 0.05) and in all tumors regardless of invasion (50% vs 18%, p < 0.005). The incidence of new endocrinopathy was less likely (25% vs 12%, p = 0.098) and the recovery of prior deficits more likely (13% vs 27%, p = 0.199) among patients treated using the pseudocapsule approach, although the differences are not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of the posterior pseudocapsule dissection plane can enhance the resection of pituitary macroadenomas.