Browse

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • By Author: Humphreys, Robin P. x
  • By Author: Tubbs, R. Shane x
  • By Author: Oakes, W. Jerry x
Clear All
Full access

Jeffrey P. Blount, W. Jerry Oakes, R. Shane Tubbs and Robin P. Humphreys

✓ Intracranial aneurysms are rare in children, and their origins and treatment methods tend to be different from those in these same entities in adults. These lesions tend to be congenital or to have an infectious or traumatic origin. In the current paper the authors trace the historical evolution of the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children. Based on the literature, these lesions appear to occur in children in less than 3% of all series. The literature also supports the suggestion that symptoms from these aneurysms are often from mass effect and that giant aneurysms and lesions in the posterior cranial fossa are relatively more common in children than in adults. The termination of the carotid artery and the anterior cerebral artery seem to be disproportionately common sites of aneurysm formation in this cohort. Interestingly, surgical outcomes in children appear to be moderately better than in adults. Based on the literature, the claim can be made that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of such aneurysms can yield good outcomes in a very high percentage of children treated.

Full access

Jeffrey P. Blount, W. Jerry Oakes, R. Shane Tubbs and Robin P. Humphreys

✓ Vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations are a mixed group of lesions characterized by an abnormal fistula between abnormal distal branches of the choroidal and/or posterior cerebral arteries and the great vein of Galen. In this paper the authors trace the historical evolution of the current approach to diagnosis and treatment, and the literature is reviewed comprehensively. During the historical era, vein of Galen malformations were described in individual case reports and an early classification system was developed. In the early era of treatment, open surgery was the preferred approach, although morbidity and mortality rates were high. The development of neurointerventional techniques allowed the introduction of occlusive materials into the fistula, with pronounced improvements in clinical outcome.

Full access

Jeffrey P. Blount, R. Shane Tubbs, W. Jerry Oakes and Robin P. Humphreys

✓ Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the most common cause of intracerebral hemorrhage in children. In this paper the authors trace the historical evolution of the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric intracerebral AVMs, and they summarize the contemporary approach and current controversies surrounding treatment of these lesions. Important distinctions between adult and pediatric AVMs are emphasized.