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  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics x
  • By Author: Englot, Dario J. x
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Dario J. Englot, Seunggu J. Han, John D. Rolston, Michael E. Ivan, Rachel A. Kuperman, Edward F. Chang, Nalin Gupta, Joseph E. Sullivan and Kurtis I. Auguste

Object

Resection is a safe and effective treatment option for children with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, but some patients continue experience seizures after surgery. While most studies of pediatric epilepsy surgery focus on predictors of postoperative seizure outcome, these factors are often not modifiable, and the reasons for surgical failure may remain unclear.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective cohort study of children and adolescents who received focal resective surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of factors associated with persistent postoperative seizures were conducted.

Results

Records were reviewed from 110 patients, ranging in age from 6 months to 19 years at the time of surgery, who underwent a total of 115 resections. At a mean 3.1-year follow-up, 76% of patients were free of disabling seizures (Engel Class I outcome). Seizure freedom was predicted by temporal lobe surgery compared with extratemporal resection, tumor or mesial temporal sclerosis compared with cortical dysplasia or other pathologies, and by a lower preoperative seizure frequency. Factors associated with persistent seizures (Engel Class II–IV outcome) included residual epileptogenic tissue adjacent to the resection cavity (40%), an additional epileptogenic zone distant from the resection cavity (32%), and the presence of a hemispheric epilepsy syndrome (28%).

Conclusions

While seizure outcomes in pediatric epilepsy surgery may be improved by the use of high-resolution neuroimaging and invasive electrographic studies, a more aggressive resection should be considered in certain patients, including hemispherectomy if a hemispheric epilepsy syndrome is suspected. Family counseling regarding treatment expectations is critical, and reoperation may be warranted in select cases.

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Dario J. Englot, Jonathan D. Breshears, Peter P. Sun, Edward F. Chang and Kurtis I. Auguste

While temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epilepsy syndrome in adults, seizures in children are more often extratemporal in origin. Extra–temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE) in pediatric patients is often medically refractory, leading to significantly diminished quality of life. Seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE vary tremendously in the literature, given diverse patient and epilepsy characteristics and small sample sizes. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies including 10 or more pediatric patients (age ≤ 19 years) published over the last 20 years examining seizure outcomes after resective surgery for ETLE, excluding hemispherectomy. Thirty-six studies were examined. These 36 studies included 1259 pediatric patients who underwent resective surgery for ETLE. Seizure freedom (Engel Class I outcome) was achieved in 704 (56%) of these 1259 patients postoperatively, and 555 patients (44%) continued to have seizures (Engel Class II–IV outcome). Shorter epilepsy duration (≤ 7 years, the median value in this study) was more predictive of seizure freedom than longer (> 7 years) seizure history (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–2.14), suggesting that earlier intervention may be beneficial. Also, lesional epilepsy was associated with better seizure outcomes than nonlesional epilepsy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.19–1.49). Other predictors of seizure freedom included an absence of generalized seizures (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.18–2.35) and localizing ictal electroencephalographic findings (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.24–1.93). In conclusion, seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE are less favorable than those associated with temporal lobectomy, but seizure freedom may be more common with earlier intervention and lesional epilepsy etiology. Children with continued debilitating seizures despite failure of multiple medication trials should be referred to a comprehensive pediatric epilepsy center for further medical and surgical evaluation.

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Dario J. Englot, John D. Rolston, Doris D. Wang, Peter P. Sun, Edward F. Chang and Kurtis I. Auguste

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of epilepsy in adults and is responsible for 15%–20% of epilepsy cases in children. Class I evidence strongly supports the use of temporal lobectomy for intractable TLE in adults, but fewer studies have examined seizure outcomes and predictors of seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy in pediatric patients. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies including 10 or more pediatric patients (age ≤ 19 years) published over the last 20 years examining seizure outcomes after temporal lobectomy for TLE. Thirty-six studies met their inclusion criteria. These 36 studies included 1318 pediatric patients with a mean age (± SEM) of 10.7 ± 0.3 years. Overall, seizure freedom (Engel Class I outcome) was achieved in 1002 cases (76%); 316 patients (24%) continued to have seizures (Engel Class II–IV outcome). All patients had at least 1 year of follow-up. Statistically significant predictors of seizure freedom after surgery included lesional epilepsy etiology (odds ratio [OR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–1.15), abnormal findings on preoperative MRI (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.16–1.40), and lack of generalized seizures (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.20–1.56). Among lesional epilepsy cases, there was a trend toward better outcome with gross-total lesionectomy than with subtotal resection. Approximately three-fourths of pediatric patients with TLE attain seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Favorable outcomes may be predicted by lesional epilepsy etiology, abnormal MRI, and lack of generalized seizures. Pediatric patients with medically refractory TLE should be referred to a comprehensive pediatric epilepsy center for surgical evaluation.