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  • By Author: Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H. x
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Michelle J. Clarke, Patricia L. Zadnik, Mari L. Groves, Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Daniel M. Sciubba, Wesley Hsu, Timothy F. Witham, Ali Bydon, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Jean-Paul Wolinsky

Object

Traditionally, hemisacrectomy and internal hemipelvectomy procedures have required both an anterior and a posterior approach. A posterior-only approach has the potential to complete an en bloc tumor resection and spinopelvic reconstruction while reducing surgical morbidity.

Methods

The authors describe 3 cases in which en bloc resection of the hemisacrum and ilium and subsequent lumbopelvic and pelvic ring reconstruction were performed from a posterior-only approach. Two more traditional anterior and posterior staged procedures are also included for comparison.

Results

In all 3 cases, an oncologically appropriate surgery and spinopelvic reconstruction were performed through a posterior-only approach.

Conclusions

The advantage of a midline posterior approach is the ability to perform a lumbosacral reconstruction, necessary in cases in which the S-1 body is iatrogenically disrupted during tumor resection.

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Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Stephen P. Juraschek, Lonni R. Schultz, Timothy F. Witham, Daniel M. Sciubba, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Ali Bydon

Object

Advocates of minimally invasive discectomy (MID) have promoted this operation as an alternative to open discectomy (OD), arguing that there may be less injury to the paraspinal muscles, decreased postoperative pain, and a faster recovery time. However, a recently published large randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing these approaches reported inferior relief of leg pain in patients undergoing MID. The authors conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate complications and improvement in leg pain in patients with radiculopathy enrolled in RCTs comparing OD to MID.

Methods

The authors performed a literature search using Medline and EMBASE of studies indexed between January 1990 and January 2011. Predetermined RCT eligibility included the usage of tubular retractors during MID, a minimum follow-up duration of 1 year, and quantification of pain with the visual analog scale (VAS). Trials that only evaluated patients with recurrent disc herniation were excluded. Data on operative parameters, complications, and VAS scores of leg pain were extracted by 2 investigators. A meta-analysis was performed assuming random effects to determine the difference in mean change for continuous outcomes and the risk ratio for binary outcomes.

Results

Six trials comprising 837 patients (of whom 388 were randomized to MID and 449 were randomized to OD) were included. The mean operative time was 49 minutes during MID and 44 minutes during OD; this difference was not statistically significant. Incidental durotomies occurred significantly more frequently during MID (5.67% compared with 2.90% for OD; RR 2.05, 95% CI 1.05–3.98). Intraoperative complications (incidental durotomies and nerve root injuries) were also significantly more common in patients undergoing MID (RR 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.77). The mean preoperative VAS score for leg pain was 6.9 in patients randomized to MID and 7.2 in those randomized to OD. With long-term follow-up (1–2 years postoperatively), the mean VAS score improved to 1.6 in both the MID and OD cohorts. There was no significant difference in relief of leg pain between the 2 approaches with either short-term follow-up (2–3 months postoperatively, 0.81 points on the VAS, 95% CI −4.71 to 6.32) or long-term follow-up (2.64 on the VAS, 95% CI −2.15 to 7.43). Reoperation for recurrent herniation was more common in patients randomized to the MID group (8.50% compared with 5.35% in patients randomized to the OD group), but this difference was not statistically significant (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.92–2.66). Total complications did not differ significantly between the operations (RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.97–2.33).

Conclusions

The current evidence suggests that both OD and MID lead to a substantial and equivalent long-term improvement in leg pain. Adequate decompression, regardless of the operative approach used, may be the primary determinant of pain relief—the major complaint of many patients with radiculopathy. Incidental durotomies occurred significantly more frequently during MID, but total complications did not differ between the techniques.

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Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Courtney Pendleton, Matthew J. McGirt, Daniel M. Sciubba, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa and Ali Bydon

At the beginning of the 20th century, the development of safer anesthesia, antiseptic techniques, and meticulous surgical dissection led to a substantial decrease in operative risk. In turn, the scope of surgery expanded to include elective procedures performed with the intention of improving the quality of life of patients. Between 1908 and 1912, Harvey Cushing performed 3 dorsal rhizotomies to improve the quality of life of 3 patients with debilitating neuralgia: a 54-year-old man with “lightning” radicular pain from tabes dorsalis, a 12-year-old boy cutaneous hyperesthesia and spasticity in his hemiplegic arm, and a 61-year-old man with postamputation neuropathic pain. Symptomatic improvement was seen postoperatively in the first 2 cases, although the third patient continued to have severe pain. Cushing also removed a prominent spinous process from each of 2 patients with debilitating headaches; both patients, however, experienced only minimal postoperative improvement. These cases, which have not been previously published, highlight Cushing's views on the role of surgery and illustrate the broader movement that occurred in surgery at the time, whereby elective procedures for quality of life became performed and accepted.

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Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Courtney Pendleton, Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan, Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa and Ali Bydon

Although Harvey Cushing was a neurosurgical pioneer, his work on the spine remains largely unknown. In fact, other than his own publications, Cushing's patients with pathological lesions of the spine who were treated while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with spinal cord tumors, have never been previously described. The authors report on 7 patients with spinal cord tumors that Cushing treated surgically between 1898 and 1911: 2 extradural, 3 intradural extramedullary, and 2 intramedullary tumors. The authors also describe 10 patients in whom Cushing performed an “exploratory laminectomy” expecting to find a tumor, but in whom no oncological pathological entity was found. Cushing's spine surgeries were limited by challenges in making the correct diagnosis, lack of surgical precedent, and difficulty in achieving adequate intraoperative hemostasis. Other than briefly mentioning 2 of the 4 adult patients in his landmark monograph on meningiomas, these cases—both those involving tumors and those in which he performed exploratory laminectomies—have never been published before. Moreover, these cases illustrate the evolution that Harvey Cushing underwent as a spine surgeon.