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  • By Author: Darcey, Terrance M. x
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Kimon Bekelis, Atman Desai, Alex Kotlyar, Vijay Thadani, Barbara C. Jobst, Krzysztof Bujarski, Terrance M. Darcey and David W. Roberts

Object

Intracranial monitoring for epilepsy has been proven to enhance diagnostic accuracy and provide localizing information for surgical treatment of intractable seizures. The authors investigated the usefulness of hippocampal depth electrodes in the era of more advanced imaging techniques.

Methods

Between 1988 and 2010, 100 patients underwent occipitotemporal hippocampal depth electrode (OHDE) implantation as part of invasive seizure monitoring, and their charts were retrospectively reviewed. The authors' technique involved the stereotactically guided (using the Leksell model G frame) implantation of a 12-contact depth electrode directed along the long axis of the hippocampus, through an occipital twist drill hole.

Results

Of the 100 patients (mean age 35.0 years [range 13–58 years], 51% male) who underwent intracranial investigation, 84 underwent resection of the seizure focus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in 27% of patients, showed abnormal findings without MTS in 55% of patients, and showed normal findings in 18% of patients. One patient developed a small asymptomatic occipital hemorrhage around the electrode tract. The use of OHDEs enabled epilepsy resection in 45.7% of patients who eventually underwent standard or selective temporal lobe resection. The hippocampal formation was spared during surgery because data obtained from the depth electrodes showed no or only secondary involvement in 14% of patients with preoperative temporal localization. The use of OHDEs prevented resections in 12% of patients with radiographic evidence of MTS. Eighty-three percent of patients who underwent resection had Engel Class I (68%) or II (15%) outcome at 2 years of follow-up.

Conclusions

The use of OHDEs for intracranial epilepsy monitoring has a favorable risk profile, and in the authors' experience it proved to be a valuable component of intracranial investigation. The use of OHDEs can provide the sole evidence for resection of some epileptogenic foci and can also result in hippocampal sparing or prevent likely unsuccessful resection in other patients.

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Kimon Bekelis, Tarek A. Radwan, Atman Desai, Ziev B. Moses, Vijay M. Thadani, Barbara C. Jobst, Krzysztof A. Bujarski, Terrance M. Darcey and David W. Roberts

Object

Intracranial monitoring for epilepsy has been proven to enhance diagnostic accuracy and provide localizing information for surgical treatment of intractable seizures. The authors investigated their experience with interhemispheric grid electrodes (IHGEs) to assess the hypothesis that they are feasible, safe, and useful.

Methods

Between 1992 and 2010, 50 patients underwent IHGE implantation (curvilinear double-sided 2 × 8 or 3 × 8 grids) as part of arrays for invasive seizure monitoring, and their charts were retrospectively reviewed.

Results

Of the 50 patients who underwent intracranial investigation with IHGEs, 38 eventually underwent resection of the seizure focus. These 38 patients had a mean age of 30.7 years (range 11–58 years), and 63% were males. Complications as a result of IHGE implantation consisted of transient leg weakness in 1 patient. Of all the patients who underwent resective surgery, 21 (55.3%) had medial frontal resections, 9 of whom (43%) had normal MRI results. Localization in all of these cases was possible only because of data from IHGEs, and the extent of resection was tailored based on these data. Of the 17 patients (44.7%) who underwent other cortical resections, IHGEs were helpful in excluding medial seizure onset. Twelve patients did not undergo resection because of nonlocalizable or multifocal disease; in 2 patients localization to the motor cortex precluded resection. Seventy-one percent of patients who underwent resection had Engel Class I outcome at the 2-year follow-up.

Conclusions

The use of IHGEs in intracranial epilepsy monitoring has a favorable risk profile and in the authors' experience proved to be a valuable component of intracranial investigation, providing the sole evidence for resection of some epileptogenic foci.

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Atman Desai, Kimon Bekelis, Terrance M. Darcey and David W. Roberts

Intracranial electroencephalography monitoring of the insula is an important tool in the investigation of the insula in medically intractable epilepsy and has been shown to be safe and reliable. Several methods of placing electrodes for insular coverage have been reported and include open craniotomy as well as stereotactic orthogonal and stereotactic anterior and posterior oblique trajectories. The authors review each of these techniques with respect to current concepts in insular epilepsy.