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Glial Origin of Monstrocellular Tumor

Case Report of Prolonged Survival

Donald P. Becker, Robert Benyo and Uros Roessmann

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Frank E. Nulsen and Donald P. Becker

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John A. Jane, David Yashon, Donald P. Becker, R. Beatty and O. Sugar

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Donald P. Becker, Henry Gluck, Frank E. Nulsen and John A. Jane

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Donald P. Becker, Cavett M. Robert Jr. and John Seelig

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Theodore G. Obenchain and Donald P. Becker

✓ An abscessed Rathke's cleft cyst was removed in a 50-year-old woman who had had headaches and episodic fever for 3 years and had been on intermittent methotrexate therapy for psoriasis for 4 years. There was clinical and laboratory evidence of panhypopituitarism. Erosion of the sella turcica was present. The patient has remained asymptomatic on replacement therapy. A brief review of abscess formation in the region of the pituitary gland is presented.

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Donald P. Becker, Jimmy A. Wilson and G. William Watson

✓ The central canal of the spinal cord was studied with canal occlusion alone, and in experimental (kaolin) hydrocephalus without and with central canal occlusion. Massive dilatation of the canal occurred with kaolin hydrocephalus. Syrinxes extending into the gray and white matter of the cord and communicating with the central canal developed in both the upper and lower spinal cord. The completely isolated central canal (occlusion at the obex and filum terminale) did not dilate, but remained patent. Canal occlusion at the obex and filum terminale completely protected the spinal cord from central canal dilatation or syrinxes in kaolin hydrocephalus. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is responsible for producing neural tube dilatation in hydrocephalus. It also supports the concept that syringomyelia results from inadequate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and increased pressure (or pulse pressure) in the spinal cord central canal.

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Theodore G. Obenchain and Donald P. Becker

✓ A woman with hydrocephalus and head bobbing presented with headaches and episodic loss of consciousness. Contrast studies revealed a cyst within the third ventricle. At craniotomy it occupied the entire third ventricle and its walls merged with the hypothalamus. This is considered to be a congenital suprasellar arachnoid cyst which expanded superiorly through the third ventricle. Similar cases are reviewed and therapy briefly discussed.

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Stanley J. Goodman, Donald P. Becker and John Seelig

✓ Intracranial pressures above and below the tentorium, arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate were recorded continuously before, during, and after expansion of a supratentorial mass in awake unsedated cats. In general, as the mass enlarged, the intracranial pressure rose; however, considerable variation was observed among animals with respect to specific mass size and associated intracranial pressures. There was considerable variation in the relationship of supratentorial pressure to infratentorial pressure. No animal survived that had sustained a mass-induced pressure exceeding 1100 mm H2O, and survival was shorter with greater pressures. Systemic hypertension occurred always and only when the infratentorial pressure exceeded 600 mm H2O, regardless of the magnitude of the associated supratentorial intracranial pressure. The methodological limitations of previous studies of mass-induced intracranial hypertension appear to have been substantially reduced by the technique described.