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  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics x
  • By Author: Ames, Christopher P. x
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Michael Safaee, Michael C. Oh, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Philip R. Weinstein, Christopher P. Ames, Dean Chou, Mitchel S. Berger, Andrew T. Parsa and Nalin Gupta

Object

Ependymomas are a common type of CNS tumor in children, although only 13% originate from the spinal cord. Aside from location and extent of resection, the factors that affect outcome are not well understood.

Methods

The authors performed a search of an institutional neuropathology database to identify all patients with spinal cord ependymomas treated over the past 20 years. Data on patient age, sex, clinical presentation, symptom duration, tumor location, extent of resection, use of radiation therapy, surgical complications, presence of tumor recurrence, duration of follow-up, and residual symptoms were collected. Pediatric patients were defined as those 21 years of age or younger at diagnosis. The extent of resection was defined by the findings of the postoperative MR images.

Results

A total of 24 pediatric patients with spinal cord ependymomas were identified with the following pathological subtypes: 14 classic (Grade II), 8 myxopapillary (Grade I), and 2 anaplastic (Grade III) ependymomas. Both anaplastic ependymomas originated in the intracranial compartment and spread to the spinal cord at recurrence. The mean follow-up duration for patients with classic and myxopapillary ependymomas was 63 and 45 months, respectively. Seven patients with classic ependymomas underwent gross-total resection (GTR), while 4 received subtotal resection (STR), 2 received STR as well as radiation therapy, and 1 received radiation therapy alone. All but 1 patient with myxopapillary ependymomas underwent GTR. Three recurrences were identified in the Grade II group at 45, 48, and 228 months. A single recurrence was identified in the Grade I group at 71 months. The mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 58 months in the Grade II group and 45 months in the Grade I group.

Conclusions

Extent of resection is an important prognostic factor in all pediatric spinal cord ependymomas, particularly Grade II ependymomas. These data suggest that achieving GTR is more difficult in the upper spinal cord, making tumor location another important factor. Although classified as Grade I lesions, myxopapillary ependymomas had similar outcomes when compared with classic (Grade II) ependymomas, particularly with respect to PFS. Long-term complications or new neurological deficits were rare. Among patients with long-term follow-up, those who underwent GTR had a recurrence rate of 20% compared with 40% among those with STR or biopsy only, suggesting that extent of resection is perhaps a more important prognostic factor than histological grade in predicting PFS, which has been suggested by other data in the literature. Given the relative paucity of these lesions, collaborative multiinstitutional studies are needed, and such efforts should also focus on molecular and genetic analysis to refine the current classification system.

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Kai-Ming G. Fu, Justin S. Smith, David W. Polly Jr., Christopher P. Ames, Sigurd H. Berven, Joseph H. Perra, Steven D. Glassman, Richard E. McCarthy, D. Raymond Knapp Jr., Christopher I. Shaffrey and Scoliosis Research Society Morbidity and Mortality Committee

Object

Currently, few studies regarding morbidity and mortality associated with operative treatment of spinal disorders in children are available to guide the surgeon. This study provides more detailed morbidity and mortality data with an analysis of 23,918 pediatric cases reported in the multicenter, multisurgeon Scoliosis Research Society morbidity and mortality database.

Methods

The Scoliosis Research Society morbidity and mortality database was queried for the years from 2004 to 2007. The inclusion criterion was age 18 years or younger. Cases were categorized by operation type and diagnosis. Details on the surgical approach, use of neurophysiological monitoring, and type of instrumentation were recorded. Major perioperative complications and deaths were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed with chi-square testing, with a p value < 0.05 considered significant.

Results

A total of 23,918 patients were included. The mean age was 13 ± 3.6 years (± SD). Spinal pathology included the following: scoliosis (in 19,642 patients), kyphosis (in 1455), spondylolisthesis (in 748), trauma (in 478), and other (in 1595 patients). The overall complication rate was 8.5%. Major complications included wound infections (2.7%), new neurological deficits (1.4%), implant-related complications (1.6%), and hematomas (0.4%). The most common medical complications were respiratory related (0.9%). Morbidity rates differed based on pathology, with patients undergoing treatment for kyphosis and spondylolisthesis having higher overall rates of morbidity (14.7% and 9.6%, respectively). Patients undergoing revision procedures (2034) or corrective osteotomies (2787) were more likely to suffer a complication or new neurological deficit. The majority of these deficits improved at least partially. Thirty-one deaths were reported for an overall rate of 1.3 per 1000. Respiratory complications were the most common cause of mortality (13 cases). Twenty-six of the deaths occurred in children undergoing scoliosis correction.

Conclusions

Spinal surgery in children is associated with a range of complications depending on the type of operation. Mortality rates for all indications and operations were low. Patients undergoing more aggressive corrective procedures for deformity are more likely to suffer complications and new neurological deficits.

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Matthew C. Tate, Anurahda Banerjee, Scott R. Vandenberg, Tarik Tihan, John H. Chi, Christopher P. Ames and Andrew T. Parsa

This 18-year-old woman presented with headache and diplopia over several months and was found to have an enhancing pineal tumor with resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. Following standard preoperative diagnostic tests, including spinal axis imaging, the patient was taken to the operating room for an endoscopic third ventriculostomy to relieve hydrocephalus and then subsequently underwent a craniotomy for gross-total resection of the pineal mass. The patient was discharged after an uneventful hospital course and received standard adjuvant cranial-spinal radiation and chemotherapy as an outpatient. Follow-up imaging 1 year after surgery demonstrated a metabolically active, lytic lesion in the C-3 vertebral body and new lung lesions suggesting a metastatic pineoblastoma. The patient underwent a C-3 anterior corpectomy and reconstruction without complication as aggressive therapy for presumed metastatic disease. Final pathological results from the vertebral lesion were consistent with radiation-induced reactive changes, not metastatic pineoblastoma as originally suspected. The patient recovered well and remains symptom free. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of reactive changes mimicking metastasis in a single vertebral body following standard therapy for resected primary pineoblastoma.