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Sophia F. Shakur, Matthew J. McGirt, Michael W. Johnson, Peter C. Burger, Edward Ahn, Benjamin S. Carson and George I. Jallo

Object

Angiocentric glioma was recently recognized as a distinct clinicopathological entity in the 2007 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System. The authors present the first 3 pediatric cases of angiocentric glioma encountered at their institution and review the literature of reported cases to elucidate the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with this novel tumor.

Methods

The children in the 3 cases of angiocentric glioma were 10, 10, and 13 years old. Two presented with intractable seizures and 1 with worsening headache and several months of decreasing visual acuity. Twenty-five cases, including the 3 first described in the present paper, were culled from the literature.

Results

In all 3 cases, MR imaging demonstrated a superficial, nonenhancing, T2-hyperintense lesion in the left temporal lobe. Histologically, the tumors were composed of monomorphous cells with a strikingly perivascular orientation that were variably reactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen. Surgical treatment resulted in gross-total resection in all 3 cases. By 24, 9, and 6 months after surgery, all 3 patients remained seizure free without focal neurological deficits.

Conclusions

Among 25 cases of angiocentric glioma, seizure was the most common symptom at presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated supratentorial, nonenhancing, T1-hypointense, T2-hyperintense lesions. Gross-total resection of this lesion yields excellent results.

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Joseph C. Noggle, Daniel M. Sciubba, Clarke Nelson, Giannina L. Garcés-Ambrossi, Edward Ahn and George I. Jallo

Object

Treatments for brain abscesses have typically involved invasive craniotomies followed by debridement. These methods often require large incisions with vast exposure and may be associated with high morbidity rates. For supraorbital lesions of the anterior and middle cranial fossa, minimally invasive craniotomies may limit exposure and decrease surgically related morbidity while allowing adequate debridement and decompression. The authors report their experience in treating frontal epidural abscesses in pediatric patients through minimally invasive supraciliary craniotomies over a 4-year period.

Methods

Three pediatric patients with frontal epidural abscesses underwent minimally invasive debridement procedures. Each procedure consisted of a supraciliary incision and a small craniotomy to expose the abscess. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative radiological evaluation including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Data were collected on preoperative characteristics, operative management, and postoperative outcomes.

Results

Two patients were male and 1 patient was female. The ages of the patients ranged from 6 to 10 years (mean 8 years). A frontal abscess was diagnosed in all patients, and all were treated surgically without perioperative complications. Microbes cultured postoperatively included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 2 patients and Staphylococcus viridans in 1 patient. The mean follow-up duration was 12.3 months. No neurological or vascular complications were noted during follow-up. All patients were treated with antibiotics postoperatively and experienced resolution of symptoms and excellent outcomes.

Conclusions

Frontal epidural abscesses can be adequately and safely debrided via a minimally invasive supraciliary craniotomy. This approach has a cosmetic benefit and may decrease approach-related morbidity.