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Raphael Guzman, Marco Lee, Achal Achrol, Teresa Bell-Stephens, Michael Kelly, Huy M. Do, Michael P. Marks and Gary K. Steinberg

Object

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease mainly described in the Asian literature. To address a lack of data on clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes in the treatment of MMD in North America, the authors analyzed their experience at Stanford University Medical Center. They report on a consecutive series of patients treated for MMD and detail their demographics, clinical characteristics, and long-term surgical outcomes.

Methods

Data obtained in consecutive series of 329 patients with MMD treated microsurgically by the senior author (G.K.S.) between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed. Demographic, clinical, and surgical data were prospectively gathered and neurological outcomes assessed in postoperative follow-up using the modified Rankin Scale. Association of demographic, clinical, and surgical data with postoperative outcome was assessed by chi-square, uni- and multivariate logistic regression, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses.

Results

The authors treated a total of 233 adult patients undergoing 389 procedures (mean age 39.5 years) and 96 pediatric patients undergoing 168 procedures (mean age 10.1 years). Direct revascularization technique was used in 95.1% of adults and 76.2% of pediatric patients. In 264 patients undergoing 450 procedures (mean follow-up 4.9 years), the surgical morbidity rate was 3.5% and the mortality rate was 0.7% per treated hemisphere. The cumulative 5-year risk of perioperative or subsequent stroke or death was 5.5%. Of the 171 patients presenting with a transient ischemic attack, 91.8% were free of transient ischemic attacks at 1 year or later. Overall, there was a significant improvement in quality of life in the cohort as measured using the modified Rankin Scale (p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

Revascularization surgery in patients with MMD carries a low risk, is effective at preventing future ischemic events, and improves quality of life. Patients in whom symptomatic MMD is diagnosed should be offered revascularization surgery.

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Marco Lee, Greg Zaharchuk, Raphael Guzman, Achal Achrol, Teresa Bell-Stephens and Gary K. Steinberg

Moyamoya disease is characterized by a chronic stenoocclusive vasculopathy affecting the terminal internal carotid arteries. The clinical presentation and outcome of moyamoya disease remain varied based on angiographic studies alone, and much work has been done to study cerebral hemodynamics in this group of patients. The ability to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) accurately continues to improve with time, and with it a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in patients with moyamoya disease. The main imaging techniques used to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics include PET, SPECT, xenon-enhanced CT, dynamic perfusion CT, MR imaging with dynamic susceptibility contrast and with arterial spin labeling, and Doppler ultrasonography. More invasive techniques include intraoperative ultrasonography. The authors review the current knowledge of CBF in this group of patients and the role each main quantitative method has played in evaluating them, both in the disease state and after surgical intervention.