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Max Whitmeyer, Bledi C. Brahimaj, André Beer-Furlan, Sameer Alvi, Madeline J. Epsten, Fred Crawford, Richard W. Byrne, and R. Mark Wiet

OBJECTIVE

Multiple short series have evaluated the efficacy of salvage microsurgery (MS) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs); however, there is a lack of a large volume of patient data available for interpretation and clinical adaptation. The goal of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of tumor characteristics, management, and surgical outcomes of salvage of MS after SRS for VS.

METHODS

The Medline/PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases were queried according to PRISMA guidelines. All English-language and translated publications were included. Studies lacking adequate study characteristics and outcomes were excluded. Cases involving neurofibromatosis type 2, previous MS, or malignant transformation were excluded when possible.

RESULTS

Twenty studies containing 297 cases met inclusion criteria. Three additional cases from Rush University Medical Center were added for 300 total cases. Tumor growth with or without symptoms was the primary indication for salvage surgery (92.3% of cases), followed by worsening of symptoms without growth (4.6%) and cystic enlargement (3.1%). The average time to MS after SRS was 39.4 months. The average size and volume of tumor at surgery were 2.44 cm and 5.92 cm3, respectively. The surgical approach was retrosigmoid (42.8%) and translabyrinthine (57.2%); 59.5% of patients had a House-Brackmann (HB) grade of I or II. The facial nerve was preserved in 91.5% of cases. Facial nerve preservation and HB grades were lower for the translabyrinthine versus retrosigmoid approach (p = 0.31 and p = 0.18, respectively); however, fewer complications were noted in the translabyrinthine approach (p = 0.29). Gross-total resection (GTR) was completed in 55.7% of surgeries. Studies that predominantly used subtotal resection (STR) were associated with a lower rate of facial nerve injury (5.3% vs 11.3%, p = 0.07) and higher rate of HB grade I or II (72.9% vs 48.0%, p = 0.00003) versus those using predominantly GTR. However, majority STR was associated with a recurrence rate of 3.6% as compared to 1.4% for majority GTR (p = 0.29).

CONCLUSIONS

This study showed that the leading cause of MS after SRS was tumor growth at an average of 39.4 months after radiation. There were no significant differences in outcomes of facial nerve preservation, postoperative HB grade, or complication rate based on surgical approach. Patients who underwent STR showed statistically significant better HB outcomes compared with GTR. MS after SRS was considered by most authors to be more difficult than primary MS. These data support the notion that the surgical goals of salvage surgery are debulking of tumor mass, decreasing compression of the brainstem, and not necessarily pursuing GTR.

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Owoicho Adogwa, Daniel R. Rubio, Jacob M. Buchowski, Alden D’Souza, Maksim A. Shlykov, and Jack W. Jennings

OBJECTIVE

The population prevalence of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) continues to increase; however, data are limited regarding the incidence rate of skeletal related events (SREs) (i.e., surgery to the spinal column, radiation to the spinal column, radiofrequency ablation, kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty, spinal cord compression, or pathological vertebral body fractures) and their impact on overall mortality. In this study, the authors sought to estimate the incidence rates of SREs in NSCLC patients and to quantify their impact on overall mortality.

METHODS

This was a single-institution retrospective study of patients diagnosed with NSCLC between 2002 and 2014. The incidence rates for bone metastasis and subsequent SREs (per 1000 person-years) by time since lung cancer diagnosis were calculated and analyses were stratified separately for each histological type. Incidence rates for mortality at 1, 2, and 3 years from diagnosis stratified by the presence of SREs were also calculated. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed to describe crude survival ratios in patients with spine metastasis and SREs and those with spine metastasis but without SREs. These curves were used to estimate the 1- and 2-year survival rates for each cohort.

RESULTS

We identified 320 patients with incident NSCLC (median follow-up 9.5 months). The mean ± SD age was 60.65 ± 11.26 years; 94.48% of patients were smokers and 60.12% had a family history of cancer. The majority of first-time SREs were pathological vertebral body compression fractures (77.00%), followed by radiation (35%), surgery (14%), and spinal cord compression (13.04%). Mortality rates were highest in NSCLC patients with spine metastasis who had at least 1 SRE. Stratifying by histological subtype, the incidence rate of mortality in patients with SRE was highest in the large cell cohort, 7.42 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 3.09–17.84 per 1000 person-years); followed by the squamous cell cohort, 2.49 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 1.87–3.32 per 1000 person-years); and lowest in the adenocarcinoma cohort, 1.68 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 1.46–1.94 per 1000 person-years). Surgery for decompression of neural structures and stabilization of the spinal column was required in 6% of patients.

CONCLUSIONS

SREs in NSCLC patients with bone metastasis are associated with an increased incidence rate of mortality.

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Abhijith V. Matur, Laura B. Ngwenya, and Charles J. Prestigiacomo

Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) are a significant cause of head injuries today, but efforts to manage and prevent these injuries extend as far back as the beginning of modern neurosurgery itself. Head trauma in MVCs occurred as far back as 1899, and the surgical literature of the time mentions several cases of children being struck by passing automobiles. By the 1930s, Dr. Claire L. Straith, a Detroit plastic surgeon, recommended changes to automobile design after seeing facial injuries and depressed skull fractures that resulted from automobile accidents. During World War II, Sir Hugh Cairns, a British neurosurgeon, demonstrated the efficacy of motorcycle helmets in preventing serious head injury. In the 1950s, Dr. Frank H. Mayfield, a Cincinnati neurosurgeon on the trauma committee of the American College of Surgeons, made several recommendations, such as adding padded dashboards and seatbelts, to make automobiles safer. Ford implemented the recommendations from Dr. Mayfield and others into a safety package for the 1956 models. Significant work has also been done to prevent head injury in motorsports. Efforts by surgeons, especially neurosurgeons, to prevent head injury in MVCs have saved countless lives, although it is a less frequently celebrated achievement.

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Marta San Luciano, Amy Robichaux-Viehoever, Kristen A. Dodenhoff, Melissa L. Gittings, Aaron C. Viser, Caroline A. Racine, Ian O. Bledsoe, Christa Watson Pereira, Sarah S. Wang, Philip A. Starr, and Jill L. Ostrem

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy and safety of combined bilateral ventralis oralis posterior/ventralis intermedius (Vop/Vim) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of acquired dystonia in children and young adults. Pallidal DBS is efficacious for severe, medication-refractory isolated dystonia, providing 50%–60% long-term improvement. Unfortunately, pallidal stimulation response rates in acquired dystonia are modest and unpredictable, with frequent nonresponders. Acquired dystonia, most commonly caused by cerebral palsy, is more common than isolated dystonia in pediatric populations and is more recalcitrant to standard treatments. Given the limitations of pallidal DBS in acquired dystonia, there is a need to explore alternative brain targets. Preliminary evidence has suggested that thalamic stimulation may be efficacious for acquired dystonia.

METHODS

Four participants, 3 with perinatal brain injuries and 1 with postencephalitic symptomatic dystonia, underwent bilateral Vop/Vim DBS and bimonthly evaluations for 12 months. The primary efficacy outcome was the change in Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) and Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS) scores between the baseline and 12-month assessments. Video documentation was used for blinded ratings. Secondary outcomes included evaluation of spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale score), quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory [PedsQL] and modified Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part II [UPDRS-II] scores), and neuropsychological assessments. Adverse events were monitored for safety.

RESULTS

All participants tolerated the procedure well, and there were no safety concerns or serious adverse events. There was an average improvement of 21.5% in the BFMDRS motor subscale score, but the improvement was only 1.6% according to the BADS score. Following blinded video review, dystonia severity ratings were even more modest. Secondary outcomes, however, were more encouraging, with the BFMDRS disability subscale score improving by 15.7%, the PedsQL total score by 27%, and the modified UPDRS-II score by 19.3%. Neuropsychological assessment findings were unchanged 1 year after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Bilateral thalamic neuromodulation by DBS for severe, medication-refractory acquired dystonia was well tolerated. Primary and secondary outcomes showed highly variable treatment effect sizes comparable to those of pallidal stimulation in this population. As previously described, improvements in quality of life and disability were not reflected in dystonia severity scales, suggesting a need for the development of scales specifically for acquired dystonia.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT03078816 (clinicaltrials.gov)

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Song Li, Saihu Mao, Changzhi Du, Zezhang Zhu, Benlong Shi, Zhen Liu, Jun Qiao, and Yong Qiu

OBJECTIVE

Dystrophic lumbar scoliosis secondary to neurofibromatosis type 1 (DLS-NF1) may present an atypical, unique curve pattern associated with a high incidence of coronal imbalance and regional kyphosis. Early surgical intervention is complicated and risky but necessary. The present study aimed to assess the unique characteristics associated with the surgical treatment of DLS-NF1.

METHODS

Thirty-nine consecutive patients with DLS-NF1 treated surgically at a mean age of 14.4 ± 3.9 years were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were stratified into three types according to the coronal balance classification: type A (C7 translation < 30 mm), 22 patients; type B (concave C7 translation ≥ 30 mm), 0 patients; and type C (convex C7 translation ≥ 30 mm), 17 patients. Types B and C were considered to be coronal imbalance. The diversity of surgical strategies, the outcomes, and the related complications were analyzed.

RESULTS

The posterior-only approach accounted for 79.5% in total; the remaining 20.5% of patients received either additional anterior supplemental bone grafting (12.8%) to strengthen the fixation or convex growth arrest (7.7%) to reduce growth asymmetry. The lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) being L5 accounted for the largest share (41%), followed by L4 and above (35.9%), the sacrum (15.4%), and the pelvis (7.7%). Type C coronal imbalance was found in 23 patients (59%) postoperatively, and the incidence was significantly higher in the preoperative type C group (14/17 type C vs 9/22 type A, p = 0.020). All the patients with postoperative coronal imbalance showed ameliorative transition to type A at the last visit. The rate of screw malposition was 30.5%, including 9.9% breached medially and 20.6% breached laterally, although no serious neurological impairment occurred. The incidence of rod breakage was 16.1% (5/31) and 0% in patients with the posterior-only and combined approaches, respectively. Four revisions with satellite rods and 1 revision with removal of iliac screw for penetration into the hip joint were performed.

CONCLUSIONS

Surgical strategies for DLS-NF1 were diverse across a range of arthrodesis and surgical approaches, being crucially determined by the location and the severity of dystrophic changes. The LIV being L5 or lower involving the lumbosacral region and pelvis was not rare. Additional posterior satellite rods or supplementary anterior fusion is necessary in cases with insufficient apical screw density. Despite a high incidence of postoperative coronal imbalance, improvement of coronal balance was frequently confirmed during follow-up. Neurological impairment was scarce despite the higher rate of screw malposition.

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Andrzej Maciejczak, Andzelina Wolan-Nieroda, and Agnieszka Guzik

Extension crosswise osteotomy at C7 (C7 ECO) was developed for the correction of forward gaze in patients with chin-on-chest deformity due to ankylosing spondylitis. A modification of cervicothoracic extension osteoclasis (C/T EO), C7 ECO replaces osteoclasis of the anterior column with a crosswise cut of the C7 vertebral body to eliminate the risks of unintended dislocation of the cervical spine. C7 ECO also eliminates the risks of C7 and T1 pedicle subtraction osteotomies (C/T PSOs), in which a posteriorly based wedge excision may lead to stretching injuries of the lower cervical roots and/or failure to achieve the exact angle of excision required for an optimal correction. Furthermore, opening the osteotomy anteriorly, as in the authors’ method, instead of closing it posteriorly, as in PSO, eliminates the risks related to shortening of the posterior column, such as buckling of the dura, kinking of the spinal cord, and stretching of the lower cervical nerve roots. Here, the authors report the use of C7 ECO for the surgical treatment of a 69-year-old man with severe compromise of his forward gaze due to chin-on-chest deformity in the course of ankylosing spondylitis. After uneventful correction surgery, the patient regained the ability to see objects, namely faces of people, at the level of his head while standing and to perform work tasks at a desk.

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Zach Pennington, Ethan Cottrill, Daniel Lubelski, Jeff Ehresman, Kurt Lehner, Mari L. Groves, Paul Sponseller, and Daniel M. Sciubba

OBJECTIVES

More than 7500 children undergo surgery for scoliosis each year, at an estimated annual cost to the health system of $1.1 billion. There is significant interest among patients, parents, providers, and payors in identifying methods for delivering quality outcomes at lower costs. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols have been suggested as one possible solution. Here the authors conducted a systematic review of the literature describing the clinical and economic benefits of ERAS protocols in pediatric spinal deformity surgery.

METHODS

The authors identified all English-language articles on ERAS protocol use in pediatric spinal deformity surgery by using the following databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane Reviews, EMBASE, CINAHL, and OVID MEDLINE. Quantitative analyses of comparative articles using random effects were performed for the following clinical outcomes: 1) length of stay (LOS); 2) complication rate; 3) wound infection rate; 4) 30-day readmission rate; 5) reoperation rate; and 6) postoperative pain scores.

RESULTS

Of 950 articles reviewed, 7 were included in the qualitative analysis and 6 were included in the quantitative analysis. The most frequently cited benefits of ERAS protocols were shorter LOS, earlier urinary catheter removal, and earlier discontinuation of patient-controlled analgesia pumps. Quantitative analyses showed ERAS protocols to be associated with shorter LOS (mean difference −1.12 days; 95% CI −1.51, −0.74; p < 0.001), fewer postoperative complications (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.20, 0.68; p = 0.001), and lower pain scores on postoperative day (POD) 0 (mean −0.92; 95% CI −1.29, −0.56; p < 0.001) and POD 2 (−0.61; 95% CI −0.75, −0.47; p < 0.001). There were no differences in reoperation rate or POD 1 pain scores. ERAS-treated patients had a trend toward higher 30-day readmission rates and earlier discontinuation of patient-controlled analgesia (both p = 0.06). Insufficient data existed to reach a conclusion about cost differences.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this systematic review suggest that ERAS protocols may shorten hospitalizations, reduce postoperative complication rates, and reduce postoperative pain scores in children undergoing scoliosis surgery. Publication biases exist, and therefore larger, prospective, multicenter data are needed to validate these results.

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Brittany M. Stopa, Maya Harary, Ray Jhun, Arun Job, Saef Izzy, Timothy R. Smith, and William B. Gormley

OBJECTIVE

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the US, but the true incidence of TBI is unknown.

METHODS

The National Trauma Data Bank National Sample Program (NTDB NSP) was queried for 2007 and 2013, and population-based weighted estimates of TBI-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths were calculated. These data were compared to the 2017 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report on TBI, which used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s National (“Nationwide” before 2012) Inpatient Sample and National Emergency Department Sample.

RESULTS

In the NTDB NSP the incidence of TBI-related ED visits was 59/100,000 in 2007 and 62/100,000 in 2013. However, in the CDC report there were 534/100,000 in 2007 and 787/100,000 in 2013. The CDC estimate for ED visits was 805% higher in 2007 and 1169% higher in 2013. In the NTDB NSP, the incidence of TBI-related deaths was 5/100,000 in 2007 and 4/100,000 in 2013. In the CDC report, the incidence was 18/100,000 in both years. The CDC estimate for deaths was 260% higher in 2007 and 325% higher in 2013.

CONCLUSIONS

The databases disagreed widely in their weighted estimates of TBI incidence: CDC estimates were consistently higher than NTDB NSP estimates, by an average of 448%. Although such a discrepancy may be intuitive, this is the first study to quantify the magnitude of disagreement between these databases. Given that research, funding, and policy decisions are made based on these estimates, there is a need for a more accurate estimate of the true national incidence of TBI.

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Mark R. Harrigan, Jan O. Jansen, and Zane Schnurman

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Michael M. McDowell, Nathan T. Zwagerman, Eric W. Wang, Carl H. Snyderman, Elizabeth C. Tyler-Kabara, and Paul A. Gardner

OBJECTIVE

Pediatric skull base chordoma is a rare entity that is traditionally considered to display aggressive behavior with an increased risk of recurrence. There is an absence of literature examining outcomes in the pediatric population in general and using the endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA).

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed all patients with skull base chordomas presenting by the age of 18 years to the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh or the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center from 2004 to 2019. Clinical outcomes, the number and location of recurrences, and progression-free survival time were determined.

RESULTS

Twenty patients met the study criteria. The most common presenting complaints were diplopia (n = 7), headache (n = 6), and swallowing difficulty (n = 4). Three cases were incidentally discovered. Twelve patients underwent single-stage EEA alone, 2 patients had two-stage EEA, and 6 patients had combined EEA with open far-lateral or extreme-lateral approaches. Fourteen patients underwent gross-total resection (GTR), and 6 patients had near-total resection. Larger tumors were more likely to require staging or a combined approach (86% vs 7%) and were less likely to receive GTR (33% vs 86%) but had comparable recurrence and mortality rates. Five patients developed CSF leaks requiring reoperation, 2 patients developed a permanent abducens nerve palsy, 1 patient suffered an internal carotid artery injury, 1 patient developed an epidural hematoma, and 1 patient developed a subdural empyema. Four (20%) patients had recurrence during follow-up (mean radiographic follow-up 59 months and mean time to local recurrence 19 months). Two patients with recurrence underwent further resection, and 1 patient elected to stop treatment. Both patients who underwent repeat resection experienced a second recurrence, one of whom elected to stop treatment. Both patients who died had an elevated Ki-67 (p = 0.039), one of whom developed de-differentiated histology. A third patient died of progressive spinal metastases without local recurrence and is one of 2 patients who developed postoperative spinal metastases. Both patients whose tumors became de-differentiated progressed from tumors with an initial Ki-67 of 15 or greater (p = 0.035) and received prior radiotherapy to the bulk tumor (p = 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of pediatric skull base chordomas, when managed at a specialized center with a goal of GTR, may have a better outcome than traditionally believed. Elevated Ki-67 rates may predict poor outcome and progression to de-differentiation.