Browse

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Jea, Andrew x
  • By Author: Fox, Benjamin D. x
Clear All
Restricted access

Akash J. Patel, Jacob Cherian, Benjamin D. Fox, William E. Whitehead, Daniel J. Curry, Thomas G. Luerssen, and Andrew Jea

Object

National and international meetings, such as the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) meetings, provide a central location for the gathering and dissemination of research. The purpose of this study was to determine the publication rates of both oral and poster presentations at CNS and AANS meetings in peer-reviewed journals.

Methods

The authors reviewed all accepted abstracts, presented as either oral or poster presentations, at the CNS and AANS meetings from 2003 to 2005. This information was then used to search PubMed to determine the rate of publication of the abstracts presented at the meetings. Abstracts were considered published if the data presented at the meeting was identical to that in the publication.

Results

The overall publication rate was 32.48% (1243 of 3827 abstracts). On average, 41.28% of oral presentations and 29.03% of poster presentations were eventually published. Of those studies eventually published, 98.71% were published within 5 years of presentation at the meeting. Published abstracts were published most frequently in the Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery.

Conclusions

Approximately one-third of all presentations at the annual CNS and AANS meetings will be published in peer-reviewed, MEDLINE-indexed journals. These meetings are excellent forums for neurosurgical practitioners to be exposed to current research. Oral presentations have a significantly higher rate of eventual publication compared with poster presentations, reflecting their higher quality. The Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery have been the main outlets of neurosurgical research from these meetings.

Restricted access

Akash J. Patel, Jacob Cherian, Daniel H. Fulkerson, Benjamin D. Fox, Joshua J. Chern, William E. Whitehead, Daniel J. Curry, Thomas G. Luerssen, and Andrew Jea

Object

Translaminar screw (TLS) fixation can be used safely and efficaciously for upper cervical fusion in children. No published studies have evaluated this technique in the thoracic spine of the pediatric population, and thus the authors undertook such an analysis.

Methods

The upper thoracic spines (T1–4) of 130 patients, consisting of 70 boys and 60 girls, were studied using CT scans. Laminar height and thickness, screw length, and screw angle were measured. Exclusion criteria included the following: patients older than 18 years of age, trauma or congenital abnormalities of the thoracic spine, or absent demographic information or imaging studies through T-4. Statistical analysis was performed using paired or unpaired Student t-tests (p < 0.05) and linear regression analysis.

Results

The mean laminar heights for T-1, T-2, T-3, and T-4 were as follows: 12.3 ± 3.4, 13.0 ± 3.5, 13.4 ± 3.8, and 14.7 ± 4.1 mm, respectively. The mean laminar widths were 6.5 ± 1.3, 6.6 ± 1.3, 6.6 ± 1.3, and 6.6 ± 1.4 mm, respectively. The mean screw lengths were 29.9 ± 4.1, 25.2 ± 3.5, 22.7 ± 3.2, and 21.6 ± 3.1 mm, respectively. The mean screw angles were 47° ± 4°, 48° ± 4°, 51° ± 4°, and 53° ± 5°, respectively. There were no significant differences between the right and left sides. However, significant differences were found when comparing patients younger than 8 years with those who were 8 years or older, and when comparing boys and girls.

Conclusions

Careful preoperative thin-cut CT with sagittal reconstruction is mandatory to determine if the placement of TLSs is feasible in the pediatric population. Based on CT analysis, the insertion of TLSs in the pediatric thoracic spine is possible in all patients older than 8 years and in many patients younger than 8 years. Boys could accept longer screws in the upper thoracic spine compared with girls.

Restricted access

Daniel H. Fulkerson, Shobhan Vachhrajani, Bradley N. Bohnstedt, Neal B. Patel, Akash J. Patel, Benjamin D. Fox, Andrew Jea, and Joel C. Boaz

Object

Premature, low-birth-weight infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus have a high risk of shunt obstruction and infection. Established risk factors for shunt failure include grade of the hemorrhage and age at shunt insertion. There is anecdotal evidence that the amount of red blood cells or protein levels in the CSF may affect shunt performance. However, this has not been analyzed specifically for this cohort of high-risk patients. Therefore, the authors performed this study to examine whether any statistical relationship exists between the CSF constituents and the rate of shunt malfunction or infection in this population.

Methods

A retrospective cohort study was performed on premature infants born at Riley Hospital for Children from 2000 to 2009. Inclusion criteria were a CSF sample analyzed within 2 weeks prior to shunt insertion, low birth weight (< 1500 grams), prematurity (birth prior to 37 weeks estimated gestational age), and shunt insertion for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Data points included the gestational age at birth and shunt insertion, weight at birth and shunt insertion, history of CNS infection prior to shunt insertion, shunt failure, shunt infection, and the levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, protein, and glucose in the CSF. Statistical analysis was performed to determine any association between shunt outcome and the CSF parameters.

Results

Fifty-eight patients met the study entry criteria. Ten patients (17.2%) had primary shunt failure within 3 months of insertion. Nine patients (15.5%) had shunt infection within 3 months. A previous CNS infection prior to shunt insertion was a statistical risk factor for shunt failure (p = 0.0290) but not for shunt infection. There was no statistical relationship between shunt malfunction or infection and the CSF levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, protein, or glucose before shunt insertion.

Conclusions

Low-birth-weight premature infants with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus have a high rate of shunt failure and infection. The authors did not find any association of shunt failure or infection with CSF cell count, protein level, or glucose level. Therefore, it may not be useful to base the timing of shunt insertion on CSF parameters.

Restricted access

Benjamin D. Fox, Hassan H. Amhaz, Akash J. Patel, Daniel H. Fulkerson, Dima Suki, Andrew Jea, and Raymond E. Sawaya

Object

Medical student exposure to neurosurgery is limited. To improve the educational interactions between neurosurgeons and medical students as well as neurosurgical medical student rotations or clerkships (NSCs) we must first understand the current status.

Methods

Two questionnaires were sent, one to every neurosurgery course coordinator or director at each US neurosurgery residency program (99 questionnaires) and one to the associated parent medical school dean's office (91 questionnaires), to assess the current status of NSCs and the involvement of neurosurgeons at their respective institutions.

Results

We received responses from 86 (87%) of 99 neurosurgery course coordinators or directors and 64 (70%) of 91 medical school deans' offices. Most NSCs do not have didactic lectures (53 [62%] of 86 NSCs), provide their medical students with a syllabus or educational handouts (53 [62%] of 86), or have a recommended/required textbook (77 [90%] of 86). The most common method of evaluating students in NSCs is a subjective performance evaluation. Of 64 medical school deans, 38 (59%) felt that neurosurgery should not be a required rotation. Neurosurgical rotations or clerkships are primarily offered to students in their 4th year of medical school, which may be too late for appropriate timing of residency applications. Only 21 (33%) of 64 NSCs offer neurosurgery rotations to 3rd-year students.

Conclusions

There is significant room for improvement in the neurosurgeon-to–medical student interactions in both the NSCs and during the didactic years of medical school.

Restricted access

Akash J. Patel, Benjamin D. Fox, Daniel H. Fulkerson, Sasidhar Yallampalli, Anna Illner, William E. Whitehead, Daniel J. Curry, Thomas G. Luerssen, and Andrew Jea

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has been described in the setting of malignant hypertension, renal disease, eclampsia, and immunosuppression. In addition, a single case of intraoperative (posterior fossa craniotomy) PRES has been reported; however, this case occurred in an adult.

The authors present a clinically and radiographically documented case of intraoperative PRES complicating the resection of a posterior fossa tumor in a 6-year-old child. During tumor resection, untoward force was used to circumferentially dissect the tumor, and excessive manipulation of the brainstem led to severe hypertension for a 10-minute period. An immediate postoperative MR image was obtained to rule out residual tumor, but instead the image showed findings consistent with PRES. Moreover, the patient's postoperative clinical findings were consistent with PRES.

Aggressive postoperative management of blood pressure and the institution of anticonvulsant therapy were undertaken. The patient made a good recovery; however, he required a temporary tracheostomy and tube feedings for prolonged lower cranial nerve dysfunction.

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can occur as a result of severe hypertension during surgery, even among young children. With prompt treatment, the patient in the featured case experienced significant clinical and radiographic recovery.

Restricted access

Daniel K. Fahim, Katherine Relyea, Vikram V. Nayar, Benjamin D. Fox, William E. Whitehead, Daniel J. Curry, Thomas G. Luerssen, and Andrew Jea

The authors describe the novel use of a table-mounted tubular retractor system (MetRx) originally designed for minimally invasive spine surgery, in the resection of an intraventricular arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in a 12-year-old child. The tubular retractor system may have several advantages over traditional Greenberg or Leyla retractors in selected intracranial procedures. In our case, the low-profile 4 × 22–mm tube and fixed table attachment offered excellent exposure of the trigone of the lateral ventricle where the choroidal AVM was located and from which it was completely resected. Immediate postoperative cerebral angiography confirmed that the entire AVM had been resected. The patient suffered no new neurological deficits as a result of the retractor system or the exposure that it afforded. Although the good clinical results of a single case cannot be directly compared with those obtained using other open techniques of intracranial surgery in larger series, microendoscopic surgery of the brain is an alternative to the other techniques and may be recommended as a time-saving, trauma-reducing procedure with the potential to improve postoperative outcomes.

Restricted access

Benjamin D. Fox, Vikram V. Nayar, Keyne K. Johnson, Andrew Jea, Daniel Curry, Thomas G. Luerssen, and William E. Whitehead