Browse

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Drake, James M. x
  • By Author: Lamberti-Pasculli, Maria x
Clear All
Restricted access

Alexandra D. Beier, Shobhan Vachhrajani, Simon H. Bayerl, Claudia Y. Diaz Aguilar, Maria Lamberti-Pasculli, and James M. Drake

Object

Diagnosis and management of atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AARS) is challenging because of its variability in clinical presentation. Although several treatment modalities have been employed, there remains no consensus on the most appropriate therapy. The authors explore this issue in their 9-year series on AARS.

Methods

Records of patients diagnosed radiologically and clinically with AARS between May 2001 and March 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 40 patients identified, 24 were male and were on average 8.5 years of age (range 15 months–16 years). Causes of AARS included trauma, congenital abnormalities, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, infection, postsurgical event, and cryptogenic disease. Four patients had dual etiologies. Symptom duration varied: 29 patients had symptoms for less than 4 weeks, 5 patients had symptoms between 1 and 3 months, and 6 patients had symptoms for 3 months or more.

Results

Treatment with a cervical collar was sufficient in 21 patients. In 1 patient collar management failed and halter traction was used to reduce the subluxation. Seven patients underwent initial halter traction, but in 4 the subluxation progressed and the patients required halo traction. A halo vest was placed in 2 patients on presentation because the rotatory subluxation was severe; both patients required subsequent operative fusion. One patient required decompression and fusion due to severe canal compromise and myelopathy. All patients requiring fusion presented with subacute symptoms.

Conclusions

Management of AARS varies due to the spectrum of clinical presentations. Patients presenting acutely without neurological deficits can likely undergo collar therapy; those in whom the subluxation cannot be reduced or who present with a neurological deficit may require traction and/or surgical fixation. Patients presenting subacutely may be more prone to requiring operative intervention.

Restricted access

James M. Drake, Jay Riva-Cambrin, Andrew Jea, Kurtis Auguste, Mandeep Tamber, and Maria Lamberti-Pasculli

Object

Complications of specific pediatric neurosurgical procedures are well recognized. However, focused surveillance on a specific neurosurgical unit, for all procedures, may lead to better understanding of the most important complications, and allow targeted strategies for quality improvement.

Methods

The authors prospectively recorded the morbidity and mortality events at a large pediatric neurosurgical unit over a 2-year period. Morbidity was defined as any significant adverse outcome or death (for obstructive shunt failure, within 30 days). Multiple and unrelated complications in the same patient were recorded as separate events.

Results

There were 1082 surgical procedures performed during the evaluation period. One hundred seventy-seven complications (16.4%) occurred in 147 patients. By procedure, the most common complications occurred in vascular surgery (41.7%) and brain tumor surgery (27.9%). The most common complications were CSF leakage (31 cases), a new neurological deficit (27 cases), early shunt or endoscopic third ventriculostomy obstruction (27 cases), and shunt infection (24 cases). Meningitis occurred in 19 cases: in 58% of shunt infections, 13% of CSF leaks, and 10% of wound infections. Sixty-four percent of adverse events required a second procedure, most commonly an external ventricular drain placement or shunt revision.

Conclusions

Complications in pediatric neurosurgical procedures are common, result in significant morbidity, and more than half the time require a repeat surgical procedure. Targeted strategies to prevent common complications, such as shunt infections or CSF leaks, might significantly reduce this burden.

Restricted access

Jay Riva-Cambrin, Allan S. Detsky, Maria Lamberti-Pasculli, Michael A. Sargent, Derek Armstrong, Rahim Moineddin, D. Douglas Cochrane, and James M. Drake

Object

Approximately 30% of children with posterior fossa tumors exhibit hydrocephalus after tumor resection. Recent literature has suggested that prophylactic endoscopic third ventriculostomy diminishes the risk of this event. Because the majority of patients will not have postoperative hydrocephalus, a preoperative clinical prediction rule that identifies patients at high or low risk for postresection hydrocephalus would be helpful to optimize the care of these children.

Methods

The authors evaluated a derivation cohort of 343 consecutive children with posterior fossa tumors who underwent treatment between 1989 and 2003. Multivariate methods were used on these data to generate the Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus. The rule's estimated risk of postresection hydrocephalus was compared with risk observed in 111 independent patients in the validation cohort.

Results

Variables identified as significant in predicting postresection hydrocephalus were age < 2 years (score of 3), papilledema (score of 1), moderate to severe hydrocephalus (score of 2), cerebral metastases (score of 3), and specific estimated tumor pathologies (score of 1). Patients with scores ≥ 5 were deemed as high risk. Predicted probabilities for the high- and low-risk groups were 0.73 and 0.25, respectively, from the derivation cohort, and 0.59 and 0.14 after prevalence adjustment compared with the observed values of 0.42 and 0.17 in the validation cohort.

Conclusions

A patient's score on the Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus will allow improved patient counseling and surgical planning by identifying patients at high risk of developing postresection hydrocephalus. These patients might selectively be exposed to the risks of preresection CSF diversion to improve outcome.

Restricted access

Benjamin W. Y. Lo, Abhaya V. Kulkarni, James T. Rutka, Andrew Jea, James M. Drake, Maria Lamberti-Pasculli, Peter B. Dirks, and Lehana Thabane

Object

Cephaloceles represent primary axial mesodermal defects, occurring in 0.8–4 per 10,000 live births. Prior studies have reported posterior location, hydrocephalus, microcephaly, seizure, and presence of brain tissue as poor prognostic markers for neurological outcome. However, these studies were small and the results were analyzed using univariate tests. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential risk factors for the occurrence of developmental delay in patients with cephaloceles, using both univariate and multivariable regression techniques.

Methods

This is a retrospective cohort study of cephalocele cases treated at the Hospital for Sick Children between 1990 and 2006. Two independent investigators collected the data from the Hospital for Sick Children Encephalocele Database and hospital charts. Developmental assessments were made by general pediatricians and neuropsychologists. Both univariate analysis (α = 0.10) and multivariable logistic regression analysis (α = 0.05) were performed.

Results

Eighty-five cases of cephaloceles were identified. The patient group consisted of 48 boys and 37 girls. Sixty-eight lesions were encephaloceles and 17 were meningoceles. The distribution was as follows: frontal (40 lesions), occipital (33), and parietal (12). Associated conditions included hydrocephalus (23), seizure disorder (17), microcephaly (6), corpus callosal abnormalities (15), heterotopias (9), cerebral dysgenesis (11), and myelomeningocele (1). Evaluation of long-term development revealed that 41 patients (48%) had normal development, 9 (11%) had mild delay, 14 (16%) had moderate delay, and 21 (25%) had severe delay. Hydrocephalus, seizure disorder, microcephaly, presence of associated intracranial abnormalities, and presence of brain tissue were significantly associated with poor outcome on univariate analysis. Multivariable analysis revealed hydrocephalus and presence of intracranial abnormalities to be statistically significant predictors of developmental delay.

Conclusions

To the authors' knowledge, this is one of the largest North American cephalocele series documented. Unlike prior studies, location of the cephaloceles is not a significant predictor of outcome. The multivariable regression analysis demonstrates hydrocephalus and the presence of associated intracranial abnormalities as variables with cumulative predictive effects for developmental delay.

Restricted access

Abhaya V. Kulkarni, James M. Drake, and Maria Lamberti-Pasculli

Object. Hydrocephalus is a common condition of childhood that usually requires insertion of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt. Infection is one of the most devastating complications that may arise from the presence of CSF shunts. In this study, the authors prospectively analyzed perioperative risk factors for CSF shunt infection in a cohort of children.

Methods. Between 1996 and 1999, 299 eligible patients underwent CSF shunt operations (insertions and revisions) that were observed by a research nurse at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Several perioperative variables were recorded. All cases were followed postoperatively for 6 months to note any development of CSF shunt infection. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the relationship between the variables and the development of shunt infection.

Thirty-one patients (10.4%) experienced shunt infection. Three perioperative variables were significantly associated with an increased risk of shunt infection: 1) the presence of a postoperative CSF leak (hazard ratio [HR] 19.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.96–52.91); 2) patient prematurity (< 40 weeks' gestation at the time of shunt surgery: HR 4.72, 95% CI 1.71–13.06); and 3) the number of times the shunt system was inadvertently exposed to breached surgical gloves (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02–1.12).

Conclusions. Three variables associated with an increased incidence of shunt infection have been identified. Changes in clinical practice should address these variables, as follows. 1) Great care should be taken intraoperatively to avoid a postoperative CSF leak. 2) Alternatives to placement of a CSF shunt in premature infants should be studied. 3) Surgeons should minimize manual contact with the shunt system and consider the use of double gloves.