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Mohamed A. Labib, Xiaochun Zhao, Lena Mary Houlihan, Irakliy Abramov, Joshua S. Catapano, Komal Naeem, Mark C. Preul, A. Samy Youssef, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

The combined petrosal (CP) approach has been traditionally used to resect petroclival meningioma (PCM). The pretemporal transcavernous anterior petrosal (PTAP) approach has emerged as an alternative. A quantitative comparison of both approaches has not been made. This anatomical study compared the surgical corridors afforded by both approaches and identified key elements of the approach selection process.

METHODS

Twelve cadaveric specimens were dissected, and 10 were used for morphometric analysis. Groups A and B (n = 5 in each) underwent the CP and PTAP approaches, respectively. The area of drilled clivus, lengths of cranial nerves (CNs) II–X, length of posterior circulation vessels, surgical area of exposure of the brainstem, and angles of attack anterior and posterior to a common target were measured and compared.

RESULTS

The area of drilled clivus was significantly greater in group A than group B (mean ± SD 88.7 ± 17.1 mm2 vs 48.4 ± 17.9 mm2, p < 0.01). Longer segments of ipsilateral CN IV (52.4 ± 2.33 mm vs 46.5 ± 3.71 mm, p < 0.02), CN IX, and CN X (9.91 ± 3.21 mm vs 0.00 ± 0.00 mm, p < 0.01) were exposed in group A than group B. Shorter portions of CN II (9.31 ± 1.28 mm vs 17.6 ± 6.89 mm, p < 0.02) and V1 (26.9 ± 4.62 mm vs 32.4 ± 1.93 mm, p < 0.03) were exposed in group A than group B. Longer segments of ipsilateral superior cerebellar artery (SCA) were exposed in group A than group B (36.0 ± 4.91 mm vs 25.8 ± 3.55 mm, p < 0.02), but there was less exposure of contralateral SCA (0.00 ± 0.00 mm vs 7.95 ± 3.33 mm, p < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between groups with regard to the combined area of the exposed cerebral peduncles and pons (p = 0.75). Although exposure of the medulla was limited, group A had significantly greater exposure of the medulla than group B (p < 0.01). Finally, group A had a smaller anterior angle of attack than group B (24.1° ± 5.62° vs 34.8° ± 7.51°, p < 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first study to quantitatively identify the advantages and limitations of the CP and PTAP approaches from an anatomical perspective. Understanding these data will aid in designing maximally effective yet minimally invasive approaches to PCM.

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Joseph H. Garcia, Ramin A. Morshed, Ethan A. Winkler, Yi Li, Christine K. Fox, Heather J. Fullerton, Caleb Rutledge, Angad S. Beniwal, Michael T. Lawton, Adib A. Abla, Nalin Gupta, and Steven W. Hetts

OBJECTIVE

Moyamoya is a progressive arteriopathy that predisposes patients to stroke due to stenosis of the intracranial internal carotid arteries and their proximal branches. Despite the morbidity caused by this condition, the ability to accurately predict prognosis for individual patients remains challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a systematic scoring method based on parenchymal findings on preoperative brain MRI to predict long-term outcomes for surgically treated pediatric patients with moyamoya.

METHODS

A retrospective surgical cohort of pediatric patients (≤ 18 years of age at the time of the initial surgery) with moyamoya from a single center were studied. Radiological variables with existing correlations between outcomes in moyamoya or other vascular diseases were chosen to score preoperative MRI based on easily defined parenchymal findings that could be rapidly assessed and used to make a numeric score. Calculated scores were correlated with clinical outcome measures using the Pearson correlation coefficient and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC).

RESULTS

A total of 35 children with moyamoya disease or moyamoya syndrome were included in the study, with a median follow-up time of 2.6 years from the time of surgery. The pediatric moyamoya MRI score (PMMS) consists of ischemic changes (0–2; 0 = none, 1 = focal, 2 = diffuse), encephalomalacia (0–2; 0 = none, 1 = focal, 2 = diffuse), and hemorrhage (0–1; 0 = not present, 1 = present). PMMSs were highly correlated with pediatric modified Rankin Scale scores at the last follow-up (r = 0.7, 95% CI 0.44–0.84; p < 0.001) as a six-point scale, and when dichotomized (AUROC = 0.85).

CONCLUSIONS

The PMMS was found to be a simple tool based on preoperative MRI data that could be quickly and easily calculated and correlated with disability. This scoring method may aid future development of predictive models of outcomes for children with moyamoya disease and moyamoya syndrome.

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Phiroz E. Tarapore, Stefan W. Koester, Joshua S. Catapano, Caleb Rutledge, Kunal P. Raygor, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Rare arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the optic apparatus account for < 1% of all AVMs. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature for cases of optic apparatus AVMs and present 4 cases from their institution. The literature is summarized to describe preoperative characteristics, surgical technique, and treatment outcomes for these lesions.

METHODS

A comprehensive search of the English-language literature was performed in accordance with established Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to identify all published cases of AVM in the optic apparatus in the PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. The authors also searched their prospective institutional database of vascular malformations for such cases. Data regarding the clinical and radiological presentation, visual acuity, visual fields, extent of resection, and postoperative outcomes were gathered.

RESULTS

Nine patients in the literature and 4 patients in the authors’ single-surgeon series who fit the inclusion criteria were identified. The median age at presentation was 29 years (range 8–39 years). Among these patients, 11 presented with visual disturbance, 9 with headache, and 1 with multiple prior subarachnoid hemorrhages; the AVM in 1 case was found incidentally. Four patients described prior symptoms of headache or visual disturbance consistent with sentinel events. Visual acuity was decreased from baseline in 10 patients, and 11 patients had visual field defects on formal visual field testing. The most common visual field defect was temporal hemianopia, found in one or both eyes in 7 patients. The optic chiasm was affected in 10 patients, the hypothalamus in 2 patients, the optic nerve (unilaterally) in 8 patients, and the optic tract in 2 patients. Six patients underwent gross-total resection; 6 patients underwent subtotal resection; and 1 patient underwent craniotomy, but no resection was attempted. Postoperatively, 9 of the patients had improved visual function, 1 had no change, and 3 had worse visual acuity. Eight patients demonstrated improved visual fields, 1 had no change, and 4 had narrowed fields.

CONCLUSIONS

AVMs of the optic apparatus are rare lesions. Although they reside in a highly eloquent region, surgical outcomes are generally good; the majority of patients will see improvement in their visual function postoperatively. Microsurgical technique is critical to the successful removal of these lesions, and preservation of function sometimes requires subtotal resection of the lesion.

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Tyler S. Cole, Mark A. Pacult, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Scientific productivity, as assessed by publication volume, is a common metric by which the academic neurosurgical field assesses its members. The number of authors per peer-reviewed article has been observed to increase over time across a broad range of medical specialties. This study provides an update to this trend in the neurosurgical literature.

METHODS

All publications from January 1, 1980, to April 30, 2020, were queried from four neurosurgical journals: Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery (JNS), JNS: Pediatrics, and JNS: Spine. Publication information was acquired from the National Center for Biotechnology Information Entrez database and reconciled with the Scopus database. Publication type was limited to articles and excluded editorials, letters, and reviews. The number of authors and affiliation counts were determined based on structured abstract fields provided in the two databases.

RESULTS

Between January 1, 1980, and April 30, 2020, the overall increase in author count for the four neurosurgical journals was 0.12 to 0.18 authors per year (p < 0.001). For Neurosurgery, the mean (SD) author count increased from 2.81 (1.4) in 1980–1985 to 7.97 (4.92) in 2016–2020 (p < 0.001). For the JNS, the mean (SD) author count increased from 2.82 (1.04) in 1980–1985 to 7.6 (3.65) in 2016–2020 (p < 0.001). The percentage of articles with more than 10 authors increased from 0.2% to 22.3% in Neurosurgery and from 1.9% to 17.5% in JNS. Only 28% of the author count variation was explained by an increasing number of institutional or departmental affiliations.

CONCLUSIONS

Author counts for peer-reviewed articles in neurosurgical academic journals have increased significantly during the past 4 decades, with large increases in the numbers of articles with more than 10 authors in the past 5 years. A total of 28% of the variation in this increase can be explained by an increase in multiinstitutional or multidepartmental studies.

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Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Arjun Gadhyia, Leandro Borba Moreira, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Bypass surgery has evolved into a complex surgical art with a variety of donor arteries, recipient arteries, interpositional grafts, anastomoses, and suturing techniques. Although innovation in contemporary bypasses has increased, the literal descriptions of these new bypasses have not kept pace. The existing nomenclature that joins donor and recipient arteries with a hyphen is simplistic, underinformative, and in need of improvement. This article proposes a nomenclature that systematically incorporates anatomical and technical details with alphanumeric abbreviations and is a clear, concise, and practical “code” for bypass surgery.

METHODS

Detailed descriptions and illustrations of the proposed nomenclature, which consists of abbreviations for donor and recipient arteries, arterial segments, arteriotomies, and sides (left or right), with hyphens and parentheses to denote the arteriotomies joined in the anastomosis and brackets and other symbols for combination bypasses, are presented. The literature was searched for articles describing bypasses, and descriptive nomenclature was categorized as donor and recipient arteries (donor-recipient), donor-recipient with additional details, less detail than donor-recipient, and complete, ambiguous, or descriptive text.

RESULTS

In 483 publications, most bypass descriptions were categorized as donor-recipient (335, 69%), with superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery bypass described most frequently (299, 62%). Ninety-seven articles (20%) used donor-recipient descriptions with additional details, 45 (9%) were categorized as ambiguous, and none contained a complete bypass description. The authors found the proposed nomenclature to be easily applicable to the more complex bypasses reported in the literature.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors propose a comprehensive nomenclature based on segmental anatomy and additional anastomotic details that allows bypasses to be coded simply, succinctly, and accurately. This alphanumeric shorthand allows greater precision in describing bypasses and clarifying technical details, which may improve reporting in the literature and thus help to advance the field of bypass surgery.

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Sen Gao, Jeffrey Nelson, Shantel Weinsheimer, Ethan A. Winkler, Caleb Rutledge, Adib A. Abla, Nalin Gupta, Joseph T. Shieh, Daniel L. Cooke, Steven W. Hetts, Tarik Tihan, Christopher P. Hess, Nerissa Ko, Brian P. Walcott, Charles E. McCulloch, Michael T. Lawton, Hua Su, Ludmila Pawlikowska, and Helen Kim

OBJECTIVE

Sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) is a tangled vascular lesion characterized by direct artery-to-vein connections that can cause life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Recently, somatic mutations in KRAS have been reported in sporadic BAVM, and mutations in other mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway genes have been identified in other vascular malformations. The objectives of this study were to systematically evaluate somatic mutations in MAPK pathway genes in patients with sporadic BAVM lesions and to evaluate the association of somatic mutations with phenotypes of sporadic BAVM severity.

METHODS

The authors performed whole-exome sequencing on paired lesion and blood DNA samples from 14 patients with sporadic BAVM, and 295 genes in the MAPK signaling pathway were evaluated to identify genes with somatic mutations in multiple patients with BAVM. Digital droplet polymerase chain reaction was used to validate KRAS G12V and G12D mutations and to assay an additional 56 BAVM samples.

RESULTS

The authors identified a total of 24 candidate BAVM-associated somatic variants in 11 MAPK pathway genes. The previously identified KRAS G12V and G12D mutations were the only recurrent mutations. Overall, somatic KRAS G12V was present in 14.5% of BAVM lesions and G12D was present in 31.9%. The authors did not detect a significant association between the presence or allelic burden of KRAS mutation and three BAVM phenotypes: lesion size (maximum diameter), age at diagnosis, and age at ICH.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors confirmed the high prevalence of somatic KRAS mutations in sporadic BAVM lesions and identified several candidate somatic variants in other MAPK pathway genes. These somatic variants may contribute to understanding of the etiology of sporadic BAVM and the clinical characteristics of patients with this condition.

Open access

Visish M. Srinivasan, Joshua S. Catapano, John P. Sheehy, Mohamed A. Labib, and Michael T. Lawton

Falcotentorial meningiomas arise along the junction of the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli. The authors present a woman in her 60s with an incidentally discovered falcotentorial meningioma, approximately 3 cm in diameter, resected with a torcular craniotomy and posterior interhemispheric approach. The galenic complex was dissected away from the tumor. In the final view, the bilateral internal cerebral veins and basal veins of Rosenthal were seen. A Simpson grade I resection was achieved. The patient experienced transient contralateral hemianopsia and was discharged home. At 1-year follow-up, her neurological examination findings were unremarkable, and there was no radiographic evidence of tumor.

The video can be found here: https://stream.cadmore.media/r10.3171/2021.4.FOCVID2125.

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Joshua S. Catapano, Fabio A. Frisoli, Candice L. Nguyen, Mohamed A. Labib, Tyler S. Cole, Jacob F. Baranoski, Helen Kim, Robert F. Spetzler, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Supplemented Spetzler-Martin grading (Supp-SM), which is the combination of Spetzler-Martin and Lawton-Young grades, was validated as being more accurate than stand-alone Spetzler-Martin grading, but an operability cutoff was not established. In this study, the authors surgically treated intermediate-grade AVMs to provide prognostic factors for neurological outcomes and to define AVMs at the boundary of operability.

METHODS

Surgically treated Supp-SM intermediate-grade (5, 6, and 7) AVMs were analyzed from 2011 to 2018 at two medical centers. Worsened neurological outcomes were defined as increased modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores on postoperative examinations. A second analysis of 2000–2011 data for Supp-SM grade 6 and 7 AVMs was performed to determine the subtypes with improved or unchanged outcomes. Patients were separated into three groups based on nidus size (S1: < 3 cm, S2: 3–6 cm, S3: > 6 cm) and age (A1: < 20 years, A2: 20–40 years, A3: > 40 years), followed by any combination of the combined supplemented grade: low risk (S1A1, S1A2, S2A1), intermediate risk (S2A2, S1A3, S3A1, or high risk (S3A3, S3A2, S2A3).

RESULTS

Two hundred forty-six patients had intermediate Supp-SM grade AVMs. Of these patients, 102 had Supp-SM grade 5 (41.5%), 99 had Supp-SM grade 6 (40.2%), and 45 had Supp-SM grade 7 (18.3%). Significant differences in the proportions of patients with worse mRS scores at follow-up were found between the groups, with 24.5% (25/102) of patients in Supp-SM grade 5, 29.3% (29/99) in Supp-SM grade 6, and 57.8% (26/45) in Supp-SM grade 7 (p < 0.001). Patients with Supp-SM grade 7 AVMs had significantly increased odds of worse postoperative mRS scores (p < 0.001; OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.9–7.3). In the expanded cohort of 349 Supp-SM grade 6 AVM patients, a significantly higher proportion of older patients with larger Supp-SM grade 6 AVMs (grade 6+, 38.6%) had neurological deterioration than the others with Supp-SM grade 6 AVMs (22.9%, p = 0.02). Conversely, in an expanded cohort of 197 Supp-SM grade 7 AVM patients, a significantly lower proportion of younger patients with smaller Supp-SM grade 7 AVMs (grade 7–, 19%) had neurological deterioration than the others with Supp-SM grade 7 AVMs (44.9%, p = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with Supp-SM grade 7 AVMs are at increased risk of worse postoperative neurological outcomes, making Supp-SM grade 6 an appropriate operability cutoff. However, young patients with small niduses in the low-risk Supp-SM grade 7 group (grade 7−) have favorable postoperative outcomes. Outcomes in Supp-SM grade 7 patients did not improve with surgeon experience, indicating that the operability boundary is a hard limit reflecting the complexity of high-grade AVMs.

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Simon G. Ammanuel, Caleb S. Edwards, Andrew K. Chan, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Joseph Kidane, Enrique Vargas, Sarah D’Souza, Amy D. Nichols, Sujatha Sankaran, Adib A. Abla, Manish K. Aghi, Edward F. Chang, Shawn L. Hervey-Jumper, Sandeep Kunwar, Paul S. Larson, Michael T. Lawton, Philip A. Starr, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Mitchel S. Berger, and Michael W. McDermott

OBJECTIVE

Surgical site infection (SSI) is a complication linked to increased costs and length of hospital stay. Prevention of SSI is important to reduce its burden on individual patients and the healthcare system. The authors aimed to assess the efficacy of preoperative chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) showers on SSI rates following cranial surgery.

METHODS

In November 2013, a preoperative CHG shower protocol was implemented at the authors’ institution. A total of 3126 surgical procedures were analyzed, encompassing a time frame from April 2012 to April 2016. Cohorts before and after implementation of the CHG shower protocol were evaluated for differences in SSI rates.

RESULTS

The overall SSI rate was 0.6%. No significant differences (p = 0.11) were observed between the rate of SSI of the 892 patients in the preimplementation cohort (0.2%) and that of the 2234 patients in the postimplementation cohort (0.8%). Following multivariable analysis, implementation of preoperative CHG showers was not associated with decreased SSI (adjusted OR 2.96, 95% CI 0.67–13.1; p = 0.15).

CONCLUSIONS

This is the largest study, according to sample size, to examine the association between CHG showers and SSI following craniotomy. CHG showers did not significantly alter the risk of SSI after a cranial procedure.

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Edoardo Agosti, Francesco Doglietto, and Marco M. Fontanella