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Open access

Endoscopic endonasal repair of temporal lobe meningoencephalocele in the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus, complicated by intracerebral hematoma: illustrative case

Rasim Agaev, Ekaterina Gormolysova, Anton Kalinovskiy, and Jamil Rzaev

BACKGROUND

Anomalies in the anatomical structure of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses often serve as a potential cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and may result in the development of a meningoencephalocele. In this report, the authors present a case of surgically treated intrasphenoidal meningoencephalocele attributed to the persistence of the lateral craniopharyngeal canal, which was further complicated by the occurrence of an intracerebral hematoma.

OBSERVATIONS

A temporal lobe meningoencephalocele located in the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was successfully managed using endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid repair (EETR). However, an intracerebral hematoma developed after resection of the meningoencephalocele, necessitating additional surgical interventions. Despite this complication, the patient exhibited a favorable clinical outcome after the surgical interventions.

LESSONS

This case highlights the potential risk of intracerebral hematoma associated with EETR of a lateral sphenoid sinus meningoencephalocele. A thorough examination of magnetic resonance imaging scans, especially identifying vascular structures, is crucial during surgical planning. This knowledge can help to prevent the occurrence of complications, including intracerebral hematoma.

Open access

Introducing next-generation transcranial surgery with the head-mounted 3D View Vision display in extracorporeal microsurgery: illustrative cases

Young Ju Kim, Hidehito Kimura, Hiroto Kajimoto, Tatsuya Mori, Masahiro Maeyama, Kazuhiro Tanaka, and Takashi Sasayama

BACKGROUND

Exoscopy in neurosurgery offers various advantages, including increased freedom of the viewing axis while the surgeon maintains a comfortable upright position. However, the optimal monitor positioning to avoid interference with surgical manipulation remains unresolved. Herein, the authors describe two cases in which a three-dimensional head-mounted display (3D-HMD) was introduced into a transcranial neurosurgical procedure using an exoscope.

OBSERVATIONS

Case 1 was a 50-year-old man who presented with recurrent epistaxis and was diagnosed with an olfactory neuroblastoma that extended from the nasal cavity to the anterior cranial base and infiltrated the right anterior cranial fossa. Case 2 was a 65-year-old man who presented with epistaxis and was diagnosed with a left-sided olfactory neuroblastoma. In both cases, en bloc tumor resection was successfully performed via a simultaneous exoscopic transcranial approach using a 3D-HMD and an endoscopic endonasal approach, eliminating the need to watch a large monitor beside the patient.

LESSONS

This is the first report of using a 3D-HMD in transcranial surgery. The 3D-HMD effectively addressed issues with the field of vision and concentration while preserving the effectiveness of traditional microscopic and exoscopic procedures when observed on a 3D monitor. Combining the 3D-HMD with an exoscope holds the potential to become a next-generation surgical approach.

Open access

Cerebrospinal fluid fistula as a complication of reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction collection for the detection of coronavirus disease 2019: illustrative cases

Lucca B. Palavani, Camila V. F. Andrade, Renato A. Andrade, Egmond Alves, Marcio Falchi Barros, and João F. Barbieri

BACKGROUND

The most used method to detect coronavirus disease 2019 during the pandemic is reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction with nasal swab. Despite being highly effective, the test does not leave the patient risk-free and can lead to serious complications. These can be traumatic nasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula and its consequences, such as meningitis.

OBSERVATIONS

In this article, the authors present 4 case reports and a literature review. The following MeSH terms in the research were used: “CSF leak case report and covid 19.” Six results were found and after searching the references and keywords 16 articles were identified. By using them, the authors tried to clarify the etiology of the fistula, its influences, and complications.

LESSONS

The authors conclude that professionals must receive training, since CSF fistula originates from technical failure and lack of anatomical knowledge. The diagnosis cannot be neglected because it can bring complications to the patient’s health.