Browse

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Refine by Access: user x
Clear All
Open access

Percutaneous lumbopelvic fixation for pathologic sacral fractures and spinopelvic dissociation: patient series

Nikolas Baksh, Caleb Yeung, and Max Vaynrub

BACKGROUND

Because patients with advanced cancer live longer, the number of patients with the sequelae of metastatic spine disease has increased. Pathologic instability of the mobile spine has been classified, and minimally invasive surgery has been well described. However, pathologic sacral instability is uncommon and often underdiagnosed. Although most sacral fractures are stable, patients with unstable U- or H-type fractures have spinopelvic dissociation and can experience progressive pain, sacral kyphosis, and neurological injury. Open lumbopelvic fusion carries a high perioperative risk for this patient population, which has often been previously radiated and is medically frail. The authors investigated the utility and safety of percutaneous lumbopelvic fixation, as previously described for traumatic spinopelvic dissociation, in the oncological setting. The authors retrospectively reviewed five consecutive patients with unstable pathologic sacral fractures who had undergone percutaneous lumbopelvic fixation after conservative management failed.

OBSERVATIONS

Patients experienced significant improvement between pre- and postoperative visual analog scale scores (9.2 and 1.6, respectively) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group grades (median 3 and 1, respectively). All patients were independently ambulatory at the final follow-up. Sagittal alignment remained stable in four patients and worsened in one. There were no major medical or surgical complications.

LESSONS

Percutaneous lumbopelvic fixation shows promising results for palliation, durability, and safety for pathologic sacropelvic instability.

Open access

Presacral mature cystic teratoma associated with Currarino syndrome in an adolescent with androgen insensitivity: illustrative case

Grant Koskay, Patrick Opperman, Frank M. Mezzacappa, Joseph Menousek, Megan K. Fuller, Linden Fornoff, and Daniel Surdell

BACKGROUND

Currarino syndrome is a rare disorder that classically presents with the triad of presacral mass, anorectal malformation, and spinal dysraphism. The presacral mass is typically benign, although malignant transformation is possible. Surgical treatment of the mass and exploration and repair of associated dysraphism are indicated for diagnosis and symptom relief. There are no previous reports of Currarino syndrome in an androgen-insensitive patient.

OBSERVATIONS

A 17-year-old female patient presented with lack of menarche. Physical examination and laboratory investigation identified complete androgen insensitivity. Imaging analysis revealed a presacral mass lesion, and the patient was taken to surgery for resection of the mass and spinal cord untethering. Intraoperative ultrasound revealed a fibrous stalk connecting the thecal sac to the presacral mass, which was disconnected without the need for intrathecal exploration. The presacral mass was then resected, and pathological analysis revealed a mature cystic teratoma. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without neurological or gastrointestinal sequelae.

LESSONS

Diagnosis of incomplete Currarino syndrome may be difficult but can be identified via work-up of other disorders, such as androgen insensitivity. Intraoperative ultrasound is useful for surgical decision making and may obviate the need for intrathecal exploration during repair of dysraphism in the setting of Currarino syndrome.