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Microsurgical resection of a ruptured intraventricular arteriovenous malformation in a neonate: considerations in management. Illustrative case

Lauren Stone, Reid Colliander, Melissa A LoPresti, Ali Shaibani, and Sandi Lam

BACKGROUND

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the most common cause of intracranial hemorrhage in children, although they are rarer in neonates. Age, location, lesion architecture, and rupture status define treatment options. Sparse literature exists to guide the management of clinically symptomatic intraventricular AVM rupture in neonates. We highlight the case of a neonate with a ruptured intraventricular AVM to showcase considerations in treatment, discuss surgical technique, and help guide management.

OBSERVATIONS

An 18-day-old female presented with lethargy in extremis and was found to have new intraventricular hemorrhage. Angiogram revealed a Spetzler-Martin grade 2 AVM with a right posterior choroidal feeder and deep venous drainage within the ventricle. Her age limited radiosurgical and endovascular interventions. She underwent an interhemispheric, transcollosal, intraventricular approach for complete AVM resection. Perioperative care was managed by a multidisciplinary team, successfully mitigating the patient’s high risk of hemovascular collapse.

LESSONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery, endovascular embolization, and microsurgery are options for AVM obliteration, and multimodal therapy must be tailored to the lesion and patient. Conservative management can also be considered. Each intervention carries risks and varying likelihoods of success. Balancing these outcomes is challenging without definitive, high-quality, evidence-based guidance. The best treatment maximizes the chance of AVM obliteration while minimizing morbidity.

Open access

Spontaneous pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery in neurofibromatosis type 1: illustrative case

Fang Shen, Shi-ze Li, Yuan-yuan Shan, Xiao Ji, and Han-song Sheng

BACKGROUND

A pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery is an uncommon clinical entity that has largely been linked with direct traumatic causes. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-related vasculopathy is a rare cause of idiopathic arterial bleeding in the craniofacial region.

OBSERVATIONS

A 46-year-old male with clinical features of NF1 presented to the hospital with an enlarging and tender right temporal mass without a history of trauma. Computed tomography angiography suggested the development of a pseudoaneurysm, and surgery was performed to resect the mass. Histopathological examinations showed focal interruption of the epithelium layer and elastic lamina, well-demarcated thickening of the smooth muscle layers of the arterial wall, supporting the diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm.

LESSONS

NF1-associated vasculopathy is likely the predisposing factor for the development of a superficial temporal artery pseudoaneurysm.

Open access

Multiple-site neural tube defects complicated by multiple-site split cord malformations and thickened filum terminale: experience at a pediatric neurosurgical teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Illustrative case

Mestet Yibeltal Shiferaw, Yemisirach Bizuneh Akililu, Bethelehem Yesehak Worku, Tsegazeab Laeke T/Mariam, and Abenezer Tirsit Aklilu

BACKGROUND

Multiple-site open neural tube defects (MNTDs) and multiple-site split cord malformations (MSCMs) are extremely rare congenital anomalies that are defined by the simultaneous noncontiguous occurrence of more than one neural tube defect (NTD) and split cord malformation (SCM), respectively, in a single case with normal neural tissue in between. This work shows the cooccurrence of MNTDs and MSCMs, which has never been reported in the literature.

OBSERVATIONS

A single-stage repair for a 13-day-old female neonate with a preoperative diagnosis of MNTDs (thoracic meningocele and thoracolumbar myelomeningocele) plus an additional intraoperative diagnosis of MSCMs (type 3c) of thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, and thickened filum terminale was done with a favorable smooth postoperative course.

LESSONS

The use of intraoperative meticulous surgical technique along with preoperative skin stigmata helped for anticipation, detection, and treatment of associated complex spinal MNTDs, especially in resource-limited settings, where preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is not routinely used. Whether to repair the MNTDs as a single- versus multiple-stage procedure is mainly a function of the patient’s tolerance to the duration of anesthesia and the anticipated blood loss for the patient’s age. The overall developmental biology and long-term clinical outcome of MNTDs compared to single NTD/SCM is poorly understood and needs further study.