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Open access

Contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal transchoroidal approach to a thalamic glioma: illustrative case

Sayedali Ahmadi, Vrun J Mistry, and Basant Kumar Misra

BACKGROUND

Thalamic lesions located in the floor of the lateral ventricle pose significant surgical challenges, given their proximity to critical neurovascular structures. Transcortical approaches are often limited by risks of injuring the eloquent cortex and nearby vessels. Furthermore, lesions extending into the third ventricle further impede accessibility. The corticospinal tract (CST), situated close to the thalamus, presents a major obstacle. Diffusion tensor imaging plays a crucial role in overcoming these challenges by accurately delineating the CST’s location relative to the lesion, enabling surgeons to plan minimally invasive and safe access.

OBSERVATIONS

A 32-year-old female presented with progressive right-sided hemiparesis over several days. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic ring-enhancing thalamic lesion extending into the third ventricle. While supine, the patient underwent surgery via a right pericoronal parasagittal craniotomy followed by a contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal transchoroidal approach.

LESSONS

This case exemplifies the utility of the contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach for treating thalamic lesions, particularly those extending into the third ventricle. This minimally invasive approach minimizes retraction of the eloquent cortex and reduces the risk of neurovascular injury, potentially leading to improved surgical outcomes and faster recovery.

Open access

A child with unilateral abducens nerve palsy and neurovascular compression in Chiari malformation type 1 resolved with posterior fossa decompression: illustrative case

Olivia A Kozel, Belinda Shao, Cody A Doberstein, Natalie Amaral-Nieves, Matthew N Anderson, Gita V Harappanahally, Michael A Langue, and Konstantina A Svokos

BACKGROUND

Unilateral cranial nerve (CN) VI, or abducens nerve, palsy is rare in children and has not been reported in association with Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) in the absence of other classic CM1 symptoms.

OBSERVATIONS

A 3-year-old male presented with acute incomitant esotropia consistent with a unilateral, left CN VI palsy and no additional neurological symptoms. Imaging demonstrated CM1 without hydrocephalus or papilledema, as well as an anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) vessel loop in the immediate vicinity of the left abducens nerve. Given the high risk of a skull base approach for direct microvascular decompression of the abducens nerve and the absence of other classic Chiari symptoms, the patient was initially observed. However, as his palsy progressed, he underwent posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty (PFDD), with the aim of restoring global cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and decreasing possible AICA compression of the left abducens nerve. Postoperatively, his symptoms completely resolved.

LESSONS

In this first reported case of CM1 presenting as a unilateral abducens palsy in a young child, possibly caused by neurovascular compression, the patient’s symptoms resolved after indirect surgical decompression via PFDD.

Open access

CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery for extramedullary plasmacytoma in the external auditory canal: illustrative case

Surya Patil, Elaheh Shaghaghian, Lorenzo Yuan, Aaryan Shah, Neelan J Marianayagam, David J Park, Scott G Soltys, Anand Veeravagu, Iris C Gibbs, Gordon Li, and Steven D Chang

BACKGROUND

Plasmacytoma, a rare plasma cell disorder, often presents as a solitary or multiple tumors within the bone marrow or soft tissues, typically associated with multiple myeloma. Extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMPs), particularly those located in the external auditory canal (EAC), are exceedingly rare and pose significant treatment challenges given their location, anatomical complexity, and high risk of recurrence.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report the case of a 72-year-old male with a history of multiple myeloma, presenting with recurrent left EAC plasmacytoma. After initial conventional radiotherapy for the lesion, a recurrence was documented in 7 years. The patient subsequently underwent stereotactic radiosurgery, which proved successful, leading to complete resolution of the lesion without any long-term adverse effects or radiation-related complications over a 45-month period.

LESSONS

This case is a unique instance of utilizing stereotactic radiosurgery for recurrent EMP in the EAC, highlighting its potential as an effective approach in managing complex plasmacytomas.

Open access

Angiographic evidence of an inadvertent cannulation of the marginal sinus following central line migration: illustrative case

Abdelaziz Amllay, Edwin Owolo, Kamil W Nowicki, Nanthiya Sujijantarat, Andrew Koo, Joseph P Antonios, Daniela Renedo, Charles C Matouk, and Ryan M Hebert

BACKGROUND

Central venous catheters (CVCs) play an indispensable role in clinical practice. Catheter malposition and tip migration can lead to severe complications. The authors present a case illustrating the endovascular management of inadvertent marginal sinus cannulation after an internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter tip migration.

OBSERVATIONS

A triple-lumen CVC was inserted without complications into the right IJV of a patient undergoing a repeat sternotomy for aortic valve replacement. Two weeks postinsertion, it was discovered that the tip had migrated superiorly, terminating below the torcula in the posterior fossa. In the interventional suite, a three-dimensional venogram confirmed the inadvertent marginal sinus cannulation. The catheter was carefully retracted to the sigmoid sinus to preserve the option of catheter exchange if embolization became necessary. After a subsequent venogram, which displayed an absence of contrast extravasation, the entire catheter was safely removed. The patient tolerated the procedure well.

LESSONS

Clinicians must be vigilant of catheter tip migration and malposition risks. Relying solely on postinsertion radiographs is insufficient. Once identified, prompt management of the malpositioned catheter is paramount in reducing morbidity and mortality and improving patient outcomes. Removing a malpositioned catheter constitutes a critical step, best performed by a specialized team under angiographic visualization.

Open access

Early cerebral venous drainage associated with focal seizures: a correlation of digital subtraction angiography and electroencephalography. Illustrative case

Olivia Holman, Joseph M Bibawy, Lara Wadi, Joel C Morgenlander, and Erik F Hauck

BACKGROUND

Early venous drainage is a critical diagnostic feature of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). However, other conditions associated with early venous drainage can mimic AVMs and AVFs and mislead the treating physician team.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a unique case of a 56-year-old man with new left hemianopsia. Workup with magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography had revealed cortical enhancement and early venous drainage, possibly caused by an AVF or AVM. Catheter angiography confirmed the presence of early venous drainage of specifically the right occipital lobe. The early venous drainage occurred as the result of local hyperperfusion limited to the right occipital lobe. Subsequent electroencephalography confirmed focal seizure activity in the right occipital lobe. After seizure control with multiple antiepileptic medications, the patient regained his vision. Repeat digital subtraction angiography revealed restoration of normal cerebral blood flow.

LESSONS

Early venous drainage observed during catheter angiography can be associated with seizure activity. Differentiation from other conditions, such as AVM, AVF, or ischemic stroke, is critical to facilitate prompt and appropriate treatment.

Open access

Incidental durotomy resulting in a postoperative lumbosacral nerve root with eventration into the adjacent facet joint: illustrative cases

Michael J Kelly, Franziska C. S Altorfer, Marco D Burkhard, Russel C Huang, Frank P Cammisa Jr., and J. Levi Chazen

BACKGROUND

Radicular pain after lumbar decompression surgery can result from epidural hematoma/seroma, recurrent disc herniation, incomplete decompression, or other rare complications. A less recognized complication is postoperative nerve root herniation, resulting from an initially unrecognized intraoperative or, more commonly, a spontaneous postoperative durotomy. Rarely, this nerve root herniation can become entrapped within local structures, including the facet joint. The aim of this study was to illustrate our experience with three cases of lumbosacral nerve root eventration into an adjacent facet joint and to describe our diagnostic and surgical approach to this rare complication.

OBSERVATIONS

Three patients who had undergone lumbar decompression surgery with or without fusion experienced postoperative radiculopathy. Exploratory revision surgery revealed all three had a durotomy with nerve root eventration into the facet joint. Significant symptom improvement was achieved in all patients following liberation of the neural elements from the facet joints.

LESSONS

Entrapment of herniated nerve roots into the facet joint may be a previously underappreciated complication and remains quite challenging to diagnose even with the highest-quality advanced imaging. Thus, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to diagnose this issue and a low threshold for surgical exploration.

Open access

Epidural lipomatosis with foci of hemorrhage and acute compression of the spinal cord in a child with CLOVES syndrome: illustrative case

Dmytro Ishchenko, Iryna Benzar, and Andrii Holoborodko

BACKGROUND

Congenital lipomatous overgrowth, vascular malformations, epidermal nevi, spinal/skeletal anomalies, and/or scoliosis (CLOVES) syndrome is the most recently described combined vascular anomaly characterized by congenital excessive growth of adipose tissue, vascular malformations, epidermal nevi, and skeletal deformities. This condition exhibits a significant variability in clinical manifestations and a tendency for rapid progression and affects extensive anatomical regions. Information regarding the association of epidural lipomatosis with low-flow venous lymphatic malformations is rare, with few reports in the literature.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department complaining of rapidly progressing weakness in her lower extremities and partial loss of sensation in the inguinal area. Radiologically, an extradural mass was identified at the T2–6 level, causing acute spinal cord compression. Urgent decompression and partial resection of the mass were performed. Despite satisfactory intraoperative hemo- and lymphostasis, postoperative lymphorrhea/seroma leakage was encountered as a delayed complication and was managed conservatively.

LESSONS

CLOVES syndrome is characterized by the combination of various clinical symptoms, not all of which are included in the abbreviation, as well as a progressively deteriorating course, the emergence of new symptoms, and complications throughout the patient’s life. This necessitates ongoing monitoring of such patients.

Open access

Evaluation of the shrinkage process of a neck remnant after stent-coil treatment of a cerebral aneurysm using silent magnetic resonance angiography and computational fluid dynamics analysis: illustrative case

Toru Satoh, Kenji Sugiu, Masafumi Hiramatsu, Jun Haruma, and Isao Date

BACKGROUND

Silent magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) mitigates metal artifacts, facilitating clear visualization of neck remnants after stent and coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms. This study aims to scrutinize hemodynamics at the neck remnant by employing silent MRA and computational fluid dynamics.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors longitudinally tracked images of a partially thrombosed anterior communicating artery aneurysm’s neck remnant, which had been treated with stent-assisted coil embolization, using silent MRA over a decade. Computational fluid dynamics delineated the neck remnant’s reduction process, evaluating hemodynamic parameters such as flow rate, wall shear stress magnitude and vector, and streamlines. The neck remnant exhibited diminishing surface area, volume, neck size, dome depth, and aspect ratio. Its reduction correlated with a decline in the flow rate ratio of the remnant dome to the inflow parent artery. Analysis delineated regions within the contracting neck remnant characterized by consistently low average wall shear stress magnitude and variation, accompanied by notable variations in wall shear stress vector directionality.

LESSONS

Evaluation of neck remnants after stent-coil embolization is possible through silent MRA and computational fluid dynamics. Predicting the neck remnant reduction may be achievable through hemodynamic parameter analysis.

Open access

Novel use of a closed-tip stent retriever to prevent distal embolism in the posterior circulation: illustrative case

Rikuo Nishii, Masanori Goto, Yuki Takano, Kota Nakajima, Takateru Takamatsu, Masanori Tokuda, Hikari Tomita, Mai Yoshimoto, Satohiro Kawade, Yasuhiro Yamamoto, Yuji Naramoto, Kunimasa Teranishi, Nobuyuki Fukui, Tadashi Sunohara, Ryu Fukumitsu, Junichi Takeda, Masaomi Koyanagi, Chiaki Sakai, Nobuyuki Sakai, and Tsuyoshi Ohta

BACKGROUND

In mechanical thrombectomy for tandem occlusions in vertebrobasilar stroke, distal emboli from the vertebral artery lesion should be prevented. However, no suitable embolic protection devices are currently available in the posterior circulation. Here, the authors describe the case of a vertebral artery lesion effectively treated with a closed-tip stent retriever as an embolic protection device in the posterior circulation.

OBSERVATIONS

A 65-year-old male underwent mechanical thrombectomy for basilar artery occlusion, with tandem occlusion of the proximal vertebral artery. After basilar artery recanalization via the nonoccluded vertebral artery, a subsequent mechanical thrombectomy was performed for the occluded proximal vertebral artery. To prevent distal embolization of the basilar artery, an EmboTrap III stent retriever was deployed as an embolic protection device within the basilar artery to successfully capture the thrombus.

LESSONS

A stent retriever with a closed-tip structure can effectively capture thrombi, making it a suitable distal embolic protection device in the posterior circulation.

Open access

Phantom limb pain, traumatic neuroma, or nerve sheath tumor? Illustrative case

Patrick J Halloran, E. Antonio Chiocca, and Andres Santos

BACKGROUND

Phantom limb pain and traumatic neuromas are not commonly seen in neurosurgical practice. These conditions can present with similar symptoms; however, management of traumatic neuroma is often surgical, whereas phantom limb pain is treated with conservative measures.

OBSERVATIONS

A 77-year-old female patient with a long-standing history of an above-the-knee amputation experienced severe pain in her right posterior buttocks area for several years’ duration, attributed to phantom limb pain, which radiated down the stump of her leg and was treated with a variety of conservative measures. A recent exacerbation of her pain led to a prolonged hospitalization with magnetic resonance imaging of her leg stump, revealing a mass in the sciatic notch, at a relative distance from the stump. The anatomical location of the mass on the sciatic nerve in the notch led to a presumed radiological diagnosis of nerve sheath tumor, for which she underwent excision. At surgery, a neuroma of the proximal portion of the transected sciatic nerve that had retracted from the amputated stump to the notch was diagnosed.

LESSONS

Traumatic neuromas of transected major nerves after limb amputation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of phantom limb pain.