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Traumatic bilateral lumbosacral facet dislocation without fracture: illustrative case

Jose Castillo, Khadija Soufi, Freddie Rodriguez, and Julius O. Ebinu

BACKGROUND

Traumatic bilateral lumbosacral facet dislocations without fractures are extremely rare. Only 7 cases have been documented since the first description by Watson-Jones in 1974. Although various treatment strategies have been reported, no consensus has been reached regarding the best surgical approach.

OBSERVATIONS

A 35-year-old female presented for medical attention following a high-speed motor vehicle collision. She sustained multiple injuries, including an abdominal aortic injury requiring emergent thoracic endovascular aortic repair. She was found to have bilateral lumbosacral dislocation without fracture (L5–S1) and was noted to be neurologically intact. Once medically stabilized, the patient was taken to the operating room for minimally invasive reduction and stabilization of her lumbosacral spine. Postoperatively, the patient was neurologically intact and remained stable with no deficits and appropriate lumbosacral alignment throughout her 2-year follow-up.

LESSONS

The authors report a minimally invasive approach to the management of bilateral lumbosacral facet dislocation without fracture. Although conventional open approaches have been described previously, consideration should be given to minimally invasive strategies in select patients to facilitate their rehabilitative postoperative course.

Open access

Robotics planning in minimally invasive surgery for adult degenerative scoliosis: illustrative case

Zach Pennington, Nolan J. Brown, Saif Quadri, Seyedamirhossein Pishva, Cathleen C. Kuo, and Martin H. Pham

BACKGROUND

Minimally invasive surgical techniques are changing the landscape in adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery, enabling surgical correction to be achievable in increasingly medically complex patients. Spinal robotics are one technology that have helped facilitate this. Here the authors present an illustrative case of the utility of robotics planning workflow for minimally invasive correction of ASD.

OBSERVATIONS

A 60-year-old female presented with persistent and debilitating low back and leg pain limiting her function and quality of life. Standing scoliosis radiographs demonstrated adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS), with a lumbar scoliosis of 53°, a pelvic incidence–lumbar lordosis mismatch of 44°, and pelvic tilt of 39°. Robotics planning software was utilized for preoperative planning of the multiple rod and 4-point pelvic fixation in the posterior construct.

LESSONS

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report detailing the use of spinal robotics for complex 11-level minimally invasive correction of ADS. Although additional experiences adapting spinal robotics to complex spinal deformities are necessary, the present case represents a proof-of-concept demonstrating the feasibility of applying this technology to minimally invasive correction of ASD.

Open access

Radiculopathy with concomitant sacroiliac dysfunction and lumbosacral degenerative disease: illustrative case

Jeffrey D. Oliver, Noah L. Lessing, Harry M. Mushlin, Joshua R. Olexa, Kenneth M. Crandall, and Charles A. Sansur

BACKGROUND

The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an important cause of low back pain and referred leg pain (RLP). Pain from SIJ dysfunction may occur in isolation or may result from a combination with lumbosacral area–mediated pain. SIJ fusion is one treatment modality for medically refractory symptoms and may also have a role in the treatment of RLP.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a challenging case of concomitant lumbosacral degenerative disease and SIJ dysfunction in a patient with radiculopathy. They provide clinical characteristics and imaging findings and discuss difficulties in dealing with the intersection of these two distinct diagnoses. In addition, the authors offer a review of the relevant literature, elucidating the role of SIJ dysfunction in causing radicular lower extremity pain, the relationship to concomitant lumbosacral degenerative disease, and outcome data for SIJ fusion as it relates to RLP.

LESSONS

With increasing numbers of patients undergoing spinal instrumentation in the setting of degenerative lumbosacral arthritis, as well as randomized controlled trial data demonstrating the efficacy of SIJ fusion for medically refractory SIJ dysfunction, it is important to recognize the challenges in understanding how both of these patient groups may present with radiculopathy. Failure to do so may result in incorrect patient selection, poor outcomes, and increased morbidity for at-risk patients.