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Andrew T. Hale, David P. Stonko, Li Wang, Megan K. Strother and Lola B. Chambless

OBJECTIVE

Prognostication and surgical planning for WHO grade I versus grade II meningioma requires thoughtful decision-making based on radiographic evidence, among other factors. Although conventional statistical models such as logistic regression are useful, machine learning (ML) algorithms are often more predictive, have higher discriminative ability, and can learn from new data. The authors used conventional statistical models and an array of ML algorithms to predict atypical meningioma based on radiologist-interpreted preoperative MRI findings. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of ML algorithms to standard statistical methods when predicting meningioma grade.

METHODS

The cohort included patients aged 18–65 years with WHO grade I (n = 94) and II (n = 34) meningioma in whom preoperative MRI was obtained between 1998 and 2010. A board-certified neuroradiologist, blinded to histological grade, interpreted all MR images for tumor volume, degree of peritumoral edema, presence of necrosis, tumor location, presence of a draining vein, and patient sex. The authors trained and validated several binary classifiers: k-nearest neighbors models, support vector machines, naïve Bayes classifiers, and artificial neural networks as well as logistic regression models to predict tumor grade. The area under the curve–receiver operating characteristic curve was used for comparison across and within model classes. All analyses were performed in MATLAB using a MacBook Pro.

RESULTS

The authors included 6 preoperative imaging and demographic variables: tumor volume, degree of peritumoral edema, presence of necrosis, tumor location, patient sex, and presence of a draining vein to construct the models. The artificial neural networks outperformed all other ML models across the true-positive versus false-positive (receiver operating characteristic) space (area under curve = 0.8895).

CONCLUSIONS

ML algorithms are powerful computational tools that can predict meningioma grade with great accuracy.

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Andrew T. Hale, David P. Stonko, Amber Brown, Jaims Lim, David J. Voce, Stephen R. Gannon, Truc M. Le and Chevis N. Shannon

OBJECTIVE

Modern surgical planning and prognostication requires the most accurate outcomes data to practice evidence-based medicine. For clinicians treating children following traumatic brain injury (TBI) these data are severely lacking. The first aim of this study was to assess published CT classification systems in the authors’ pediatric cohort. A pediatric-specific machine-learning algorithm called an artificial neural network (ANN) was then created that robustly outperformed traditional CT classification systems in predicting TBI outcomes in children.

METHODS

The clinical records of children under the age of 18 who suffered a TBI and underwent head CT within 24 hours after TBI (n = 565) were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS

“Favorable” outcome (alive with Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] score ≥ 4 at 6 months postinjury, n = 533) and “unfavorable” outcome (death at 6 months or GOS score ≤ 3 at 6 months postinjury, n = 32) were used as the primary outcomes. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to delineate the strength of each CT grading system in predicting survival (Helsinki, 0.814; Rotterdam, 0.838; and Marshall, 0.781). The AUC for CT score in predicting GOS score ≤ 3, a measure of overall functionality, was similarly predictive (Helsinki, 0.717; Rotterdam, 0.748; and Marshall, 0.663). An ANN was then constructed that was able to predict 6-month outcomes with profound accuracy (AUC = 0.9462 ± 0.0422).

CONCLUSIONS

This study showed that machine-learning can be leveraged to more accurately predict TBI outcomes in children.

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Anthony V. Nguyen, Elizabeth E. Blears, Evan Ross, Rishi R. Lall and Juan Ortega-Barnett

OBJECTIVE

Glioblastoma (GBM) and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) are common intracranial pathologies encountered by neurosurgeons. They often may have similar radiological findings, making diagnosis difficult without surgical biopsy; however, management is quite different between these two entities. Recently, predictive analytics, including machine learning (ML), have garnered attention for their potential to aid in the diagnostic assessment of a variety of pathologies. Several ML algorithms have recently been designed to differentiate GBM from PCNSL radiologically with a high sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the implementation of ML algorithms in differentiating GBM and PCNSL.

METHODS

The authors performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to select and evaluate studies that included themes of ML and brain tumors. These studies were further narrowed down to focus on works published between January 2008 and May 2018 addressing the use of ML in training models to distinguish between GBM and PCNSL on radiological imaging. Outcomes assessed were test characteristics such as accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).

RESULTS

Eight studies were identified addressing use of ML in training classifiers to distinguish between GBM and PCNSL on radiological imaging. ML performed well with the lowest reported AUC being 0.878. In studies in which ML was directly compared with radiologists, ML performed better than or as well as the radiologists. However, when ML was applied to an external data set, it performed more poorly.

CONCLUSIONS

Few studies have applied ML to solve the problem of differentiating GBM from PCNSL using imaging alone. Of the currently published studies, ML algorithms have demonstrated promising results and certainly have the potential to aid radiologists with difficult cases, which could expedite the neurosurgical decision-making process. It is likely that ML algorithms will help to optimize neurosurgical patient outcomes as well as the cost-effectiveness of neurosurgical care if the problem of overfitting can be overcome.

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Todd C. Hollon, Adish Parikh, Balaji Pandian, Jamaal Tarpeh, Daniel A. Orringer, Ariel L. Barkan, Erin L. McKean and Stephen E. Sullivan

OBJECTIVE

Pituitary adenomas occur in a heterogeneous patient population with diverse perioperative risk factors, endocrinopathies, and other tumor-related comorbidities. This heterogeneity makes predicting postoperative outcomes challenging when using traditional scoring systems. Modern machine learning algorithms can automatically identify the most predictive risk factors and learn complex risk-factor interactions using training data to build a robust predictive model that can generalize to new patient cohorts. The authors sought to build a predictive model using supervised machine learning to accurately predict early outcomes of pituitary adenoma surgery.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort of 400 consecutive pituitary adenoma patients was used. Patient variables/predictive features were limited to common patient characteristics to improve model implementation. Univariate and multivariate odds ratio analysis was performed to identify individual risk factors for common postoperative complications and to compare risk factors with model predictors. The study population was split into 300 training/validation patients and 100 testing patients to train and evaluate four machine learning models using binary classification accuracy for predicting early outcomes.

RESULTS

The study included a total of 400 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 53.9 ± 16.3 years, 59.8% of patients had nonfunctioning adenomas and 84.7% had macroadenomas, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 32.6 ± 7.8 (58.0% obesity rate). Multivariate odds ratio analysis demonstrated that age < 40 years was associated with a 2.86 greater odds of postoperative diabetes insipidus and that nonobese patients (BMI < 30) were 2.2 times more likely to develop postoperative hyponatremia. Using broad criteria for a poor early postoperative outcome—major medical and early surgical complications, extended length of stay, emergency department admission, inpatient readmission, and death—31.0% of patients met criteria for a poor early outcome. After model training, a logistic regression model with elastic net (LR-EN) regularization best predicted early postoperative outcomes of pituitary adenoma surgery on the 100-patient testing set—sensitivity 68.0%, specificity 93.3%, overall accuracy 87.0%. The receiver operating characteristic and precision-recall curves for the LR-EN model had areas under the curve of 82.7 and 69.5, respectively. The most important predictive variables were lowest perioperative sodium, age, BMI, highest perioperative sodium, and Cushing’s disease.

CONCLUSIONS

Early postoperative outcomes of pituitary adenoma surgery can be predicted with 87% accuracy using a machine learning approach. These results provide insight into how predictive modeling using machine learning can be used to improve the perioperative management of pituitary adenoma patients.

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Aiko Terada, Masaki Komiyama, Tomoya Ishiguro, Yasunari Niimi and Hidenori Oishi

The authors performed a nationwide study in Japan to evaluate the annual detected rate of pediatric intracranial arteriovenous (AV) shunts such as brain AV malformations (BAVMs), pial AV fistulas (PAVFs), vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (VGAMs), and dural AV fistulas (DAVFs). These rates were revealed for the first time and showed that VGAM, DAVF, and PAVF were relatively common but that BAVMs were extremely rare in neonates and infants.

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Nikhil Paliwal, Prakhar Jaiswal, Vincent M. Tutino, Hussain Shallwani, Jason M. Davies, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Rahul Rai and Hui Meng

OBJECTIVE

Flow diverters (FDs) are designed to occlude intracranial aneurysms (IAs) while preserving flow to essential arteries. Incomplete occlusion exposes patients to risks of thromboembolic complications and rupture. A priori assessment of FD treatment outcome could enable treatment optimization leading to better outcomes. To that end, the authors applied image-based computational analysis to clinically FD-treated aneurysms to extract information regarding morphology, pre- and post-treatment hemodynamics, and FD-device characteristics and then used these parameters to train machine learning algorithms to predict 6-month clinical outcomes after FD treatment.

METHODS

Data were retrospectively collected for 84 FD-treated sidewall aneurysms in 80 patients. Based on 6-month angiographic outcomes, IAs were classified as occluded (n = 63) or residual (incomplete occlusion, n = 21). For each case, the authors modeled FD deployment using a fast virtual stenting algorithm and hemodynamics using image-based computational fluid dynamics. Sixteen morphological, hemodynamic, and FD-based parameters were calculated for each aneurysm. Aneurysms were randomly assigned to a training or testing cohort in approximately a 3:1 ratio. The Student t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test were performed on data from the training cohort to identify significant parameters distinguishing the occluded from residual groups. Predictive models were trained using 4 types of supervised machine learning algorithms: logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM; linear and Gaussian kernels), K-nearest neighbor, and neural network (NN). In the testing cohort, the authors compared outcome prediction by each model trained using all parameters versus only the significant parameters.

RESULTS

The training cohort (n = 64) consisted of 48 occluded and 16 residual aneurysms and the testing cohort (n = 20) consisted of 15 occluded and 5 residual aneurysms. Significance tests yielded 2 morphological (ostium ratio and neck ratio) and 3 hemodynamic (pre-treatment inflow rate, post-treatment inflow rate, and post-treatment aneurysm averaged velocity) discriminants between the occluded (good-outcome) and the residual (bad-outcome) group. In both training and testing, all the models trained using all 16 parameters performed better than all the models trained using only the 5 significant parameters. Among the all-parameter models, NN (AUC = 0.967) performed the best during training, followed by LR and linear SVM (AUC = 0.941 and 0.914, respectively). During testing, NN and Gaussian-SVM models had the highest accuracy (90%) in predicting occlusion outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

NN and Gaussian-SVM models incorporating all 16 morphological, hemodynamic, and FD-related parameters predicted 6-month occlusion outcome of FD treatment with 90% accuracy. More robust models using the computational workflow and machine learning could be trained on larger patient databases toward clinical use in patient-specific treatment planning and optimization.

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Clinton J. Devin, Mohamad Bydon, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Inamullah Khan, Ahilan Sivaganesan, Matthew J. McGirt, Kristin R. Archer, Kevin T. Foley, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Erica F. Bisson, John J. Knightly, Christopher I. Shaffrey and Anthony L. Asher

OBJECTIVE

Back pain and neck pain are two of the most common causes of work loss due to disability, which poses an economic burden on society. Due to recent changes in healthcare policies, patient-centered outcomes including return to work have been increasingly prioritized by physicians and hospitals to optimize healthcare delivery. In this study, the authors used a national spine registry to identify clinical factors associated with return to work at 3 months among patients undergoing a cervical spine surgery.

METHODS

The authors queried the Quality Outcomes Database registry for information collected from April 2013 through March 2017 for preoperatively employed patients undergoing cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and operative variables, and baseline patient-reported outcomes. Multiple imputations were used for missing values and multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with higher odds of returning to work. Bootstrap resampling (200 iterations) was used to assess the validity of the model. A nomogram was constructed using the results of the multivariable model.

RESULTS

A total of 4689 patients were analyzed, of whom 82.2% (n = 3854) returned to work at 3 months postoperatively. Among previously employed and working patients, 89.3% (n = 3443) returned to work compared to 52.3% (n = 411) among those who were employed but not working (e.g., were on a leave) at the time of surgery (p < 0.001). On multivariable logistic regression the authors found that patients who were less likely to return to work were older (age > 56–65 years: OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57–0.85, p < 0.001; age > 65 years: OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.43–0.97, p = 0.02); were employed but not working (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.20–0.29, p < 0.001); were employed part time (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.42–0.76, p < 0.001); had a heavy-intensity (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.32–0.54, p < 0.001) or medium-intensity (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46–0.76, p < 0.001) occupation compared to a sedentary occupation type; had workers’ compensation (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.28–0.53, p < 0.001); had a higher Neck Disability Index score at baseline (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.51–0.70, p = 0.017); were more likely to present with myelopathy (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.42–0.63, p < 0.001); and had more levels fused (3–5 levels: OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.35–0.61, p < 0.001). Using the multivariable analysis, the authors then constructed a nomogram to predict return to work, which was found to have an area under the curve of 0.812 and good validity.

CONCLUSIONS

Return to work is a crucial outcome that is being increasingly prioritized for employed patients undergoing spine surgery. The results from this study could help surgeons identify at-risk patients so that preoperative expectations could be discussed more comprehensively.

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Krishna Chaitanya Joshi, Ignacio Larrabide, Ahmed Saied, Nada Elsaid, Hector Fernandez and Demetrius K. Lopes

OBJECTIVE

The authors sought to validate the use of a software-based simulation for preassessment of braided self-expanding stents in the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms.

METHODS

This was a retrospective, observational, single-center study of 13 unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with braided self-expanding stents. Pre- and postprocedural angiographic studies were analyzed. ANKYRAS software was used to compare the following 3 variables: the manufacturer-given nominal length (NL), software-calculated simulated length (SL), and the actual measured length (ML) of the stent. Appropriate statistical methods were used to draw correlations among the 3 lengths.

RESULTS

In this study, data obtained in 13 patients treated with braided self-expanding stents were analyzed. Data for the 3 lengths were collected for all patients. Error discrepancy was calculated by mean squared error (NL to ML −22.2; SL to ML −6.14, p < 0.05), mean absolute error (NL to ML 3.88; SL to ML −1.84, p < 0.05), and mean error (NL to ML −3.81; SL to ML −1.22, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The ML was usually less than the NL given by the manufacturer, indicating significant change in length in most cases. Computational software-based simulation for preassessment of the braided self-expanding stents is a safe and effective way for accurately calculating the change in length to aid in choosing the right-sized stent for optimal placement in complex intracranial vasculature.