Browse

You are looking at 121 - 130 of 7,753 items for

  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Free access

Spinal instrumentation in infants, children, and adolescents: a review

JNSPG 75th Anniversary Invited Review Article

Stephen Mendenhall, Dillon Mobasser, Katherine Relyea and Andrew Jea

OBJECTIVE

The evolution of pediatric spinal instrumentation has progressed in the last 70 years since the popularization of the Harrington rod showing the feasibility of placing spinal instrumentation into the pediatric spine. Although lacking in pediatric-specific spinal instrumentation, when possible, adult instrumentation techniques and tools have been adapted for the pediatric spine. A new generation of pediatric neurosurgeons with interest in complex spine disorder has pushed the field forward, while keeping the special nuances of the growing immature spine in mind. The authors sought to review their own experience with various types of spinal instrumentation in the pediatric spine and document the state of the art for pediatric spine surgery.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed patients in their practice who underwent complex spine surgery. Patient demographics, operative data, and perioperative complications were recorded. At the same time, the authors surveyed the literature for spinal instrumentation techniques that have been utilized in the pediatric spine. The authors chronicle the past and present of pediatric spinal instrumentation, and speculate about its future.

RESULTS

The medical records of the first 361 patients who underwent 384 procedures involving spinal instrumentation from July 1, 2007, to May 31, 2018, were analyzed. The mean age at surgery was 12 years and 6 months (range 3 months to 21 years and 4 months). The types of spinal instrumentation utilized included occipital screws (94 cases); C1 lateral mass screws (115 cases); C2 pars/translaminar screws (143 cases); subaxial cervical lateral mass screws (95 cases); thoracic and lumbar spine traditional-trajectory and cortical-trajectory pedicle screws (234 cases); thoracic and lumbar sublaminar, subtransverse, and subcostal polyester bands (65 cases); S1 pedicle screws (103 cases); and S2 alar-iliac/iliac screws (56 cases). Complications related to spinal instrumentation included hardware-related skin breakdown (1.8%), infection (1.8%), proximal junctional kyphosis (1.0%), pseudarthroses (1.0%), screw malpositioning (0.5%), CSF leak (0.5%), hardware failure (0.5%), graft migration (0.3%), nerve root injury (0.3%), and vertebral artery injury (0.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

Pediatric neurosurgeons with an interest in complex spine disorders in children should develop a comprehensive armamentarium of safe techniques for placing rigid and nonrigid spinal instrumentation even in the smallest of children, with low complication rates. The authors’ review provides some benchmarks and outcomes for comparison, and furnishes a historical perspective of the past and future of pediatric spine surgery.

Free access

Ghada Waheed, Mohamed A. R. Soliman, Ahmed M. Ali and Mohamed H. Aly

OBJECTIVE

Spontaneous spondylodiscitis remains uncommon but is a serious complication of the vertebral column. Risk factors include diabetes, hemodialysis, intravenous drug abuse, and chronic steroid use, and pain is the most common presenting symptom. This study aims to review the literature and report on the incidence, management, and clinical outcome of spontaneous spondylodiscitis in 44 patients.

METHODS

This is a prospective study including 44 patients with spontaneous spondylodiscitis managed in the neurosurgery department of Cairo University Hospitals during the period between January 2012 and October 2017. All patients had a full clinical assessment, laboratory tests, radiological studies in the form of MRI with and without contrast, and a postoperative follow-up of up to 12 months.

RESULTS

Twelve cases underwent conservative treatment in the form of complete bed rest, intravenous antibiotics, and a spinal brace. Ten cases underwent surgical intervention in the form of laminectomy, debridement, and open biopsy. Twenty-two cases underwent laminectomy and surgical stabilization with fusion. There were 15 cases of tuberculous spondylodiscitis, 6 cases of brucellosis, 6 cases of pyogenic infection, and 17 cases in which no organism could be detected.

CONCLUSIONS

Once the primary diagnosis is confirmed, early and adequately prolonged antibiotic therapy is recommended for spontaneous spondylodiscitis. Some cases can be successfully treated with conservative treatment alone, whereas surgery may be needed in other cases such as severe destruction of endplates, spinal abscess formation, mechanical instability, neurological deficits, and severe pain that have failed to respond to conservative treatment.

Free access

Kunal Vakharia, Stephan A. Munich, Michael K. Tso, Muhammad Waqas and Elad I. Levy

Stent-assisted coiling offers a potential solution for coil embolization of broad-based aneurysms. Challenges associated with navigating a microcatheter beyond these aneurysms sometimes require looping the microcatheter within the aneurysm dome. Reducing microcatheter loops within domes can be difficult, and anchor techniques have been described, including balloon anchor, stent-retriever anchor, and stent anchor techniques. The authors present a patient requiring stent-assisted coiling of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm in whom a stent anchor technique was used to reduce a microcatheter loop within an aneurysm dome before coil embolization. Postembolization angiographic runs showed complete coil occlusion of the aneurysm with approximately 35% packing density.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/zHR1ZOArUro.

Free access

Krishna C. Joshi, Daniel M. Heiferman, André Beer-Furlan and Demetrius K. Lopes

External carotid artery (ECA) to internal carotid artery (ICA) bypass is a well-established procedure for the treatment of chronic ischemic diseases of the carotid artery. Rarely de novo aneurysms can develop at the site of anastomosis. The treatment of these aneurysms can be very challenging due to various factors, including the presence of graft, previous craniotomy, atherosclerotic vessels, and lack of direct access. In this video the authors report and discuss the management of a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) wide-necked de novo aneurysm by stent-assisted coiling through a retrograde trans-posterior communicating artery access.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/MBKolPvOErU.

Free access

Waleed Brinjikji, Harry J. Cloft, Giuseppe Lanzino, Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Pearse P. Morris

Arteriovenous fistulae of the internal maxillary artery are exceedingly rare, with less than 30 cases reported in the literature. Most of these lesions are congenital, iatrogenic, or posttraumatic. The most common presentation of internal maxillary artery fistulae is pulsatile tinnitus and headache. Because these lesions are single-hole fistulae, they can be easily cured with endovascular techniques. The authors present a case of a patient who presented to their institution with a several-year history of pulsatile tinnitus who was found to have an internal maxillary artery arteriovenous fistula, which was treated endovascularly with transarterial coil and Onyx embolization.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/fDZVMMwpwRc.

Free access

Leonardo Rangel-Castilla, Hussain Shallwani and Adnan H. Siddiqui

Transvenous embolization (TE) has been increasingly applied for arteriovenous malformation (AVM) treatment. Transient cardiac standstill (TCS) has been described in cerebrovascular surgery but is uncommon for endovascular embolization. The authors present a patient with a ruptured thalamic AVM in whom both techniques were applied simultaneously. Surgery was considered, but the patient refused. Transarterial embolization was performed with an incomplete result. The deep-seated draining vein provided sole access to the AVM. A microcatheter was advanced into the draining vein. Under TCS, achieved with rapid ventricular pacing, complete AVM embolization was obtained. One-year magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography demonstrated no residual AVM.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/CAzb9md_xBU.

Free access

Oriela Rustemi, Loris Di Clemente, Fabio Raneri, Lorenzo Volpin and Giuseppe Iannucci

Distal, dissecting, middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms are changing surgically and endovascularly. Endovascular treatment requires flow diverter stenting. A good vessel visualization is crucial for safe navigation. Three-dimensional rotational digital subtraction angiography (3D-DSA) is used routinely in diagnostic imaging. The utilization of the 3D-DSA road map in vessel navigation and stent deployment is novel. An illustrative video of a distal, dissecting left MCA aneurysm treated with flow diverter stenting is presented. The technical issues were distal location, dissecting nature with double lumen, proximal stenosis, and vessel curves. The 3D-DSA road map helped to enhance visualization with a safer procedure.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/sS3o1Z0P8WE.