Browse

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Vascular Disorders x
  • Pituitary Surgery x
  • Refine by Access: user x
Clear All
Open access

Radiological features of internal carotid artery occlusion caused by pituitary apoplexy: illustrative case

Keigo Aramaki, Masanori Aihara, Yu Kanazawa, Takahiro Kawashima, Rei Yamaguchi, Masahiro Matsumoto, Masahiko Tosaka, and Yuhei Yoshimoto

BACKGROUND

Pituitary apoplexy rarely causes internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion and acute ischemic stroke. Some cases have been reported, but the neuroimaging findings, including cerebral angiography, have not been discussed.

OBSERVATIONS

A 55-year-old male suffered the sudden onset of right cervical pain and left mild hemiparesis. Computed tomography indicated a pituitary mass, and magnetic resonance angiography showed a right ICA occlusion. The initial diagnosis was ICA occlusion caused by ICA dissection. His symptoms worsened and the region of cerebral infarction expanded, so the patient was transferred to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography showed the sudden stoppage of right ICA blood flow caused by local compression of the tumor near the distal dural ring. The diagnosis was acute ischemic stroke resulting from ICA pseudo-occlusion caused by pituitary apoplexy, and emergent endoscopic transsphenoidal resection was performed. Postoperatively, the right ICA was completely patent, and hemiparesis was improved with rehabilitation.

LESSONS

ICA occlusion caused by pituitary apoplexy is very rare, but emergent treatment is necessary. However, the pathology is difficult to diagnose quickly. Neuroimaging findings showing that the ICA is easily stenosed or occluded if rapidly compressed by the tumor near the distal dural ring may be useful to rapidly diagnose and treat.

Open access

Cerebral vasospasm as a consequence of pituitary apoplexy: illustrative case

Somayah Alsayadi, Rafael Ochoa-Sanchez, Ioana D. Moldovan, and Fahad Alkherayf

BACKGROUND

Cerebral vasospasm is a rare but devastating complication following pituitary apoplexy. Cerebral vasospasm is often associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and early detection is crucial for proper management.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of cerebral vasospasm after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoid surgery (EETS) in a patient with pituitary apoplexy secondary to pituitary adenoma. They also present a literature review of all similar cases published to date. The patient is a 62-year-old male who presented with headache, nausea, vomiting, weakness, and fatigue. He was diagnosed with pituitary adenoma with hemorrhage, for which he underwent EETS. Pre- and postoperative scans showed SAH. On postoperative day 11, he presented with confusion, aphasia, arm weakness, and unsteady gait. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans were consistent with cerebral vasospasm. The patient underwent endovascular treatment of acute intracranial vasospasm and was responsive to intra-arterial milrinone and verapamil infusion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries. There were no further complications.

LESSONS

Cerebral vasospasm is a severe complication that can occur after pituitary apoplexy. It is essential to assess the risk factors linked to the cerebral vasospasm. In addition, a high index of suspicion will allow neurosurgeons to diagnose cerebral vasospasm after EETS early and take the necessary measures to manage it accordingly.

Open access

Pituitary macroadenoma causing vision loss in Wyburn-Mason syndrome: illustrative case

Nicholas F. Hug, David A. Purger, Heather E. Moss, and Robert L. Dodd

BACKGROUND

Wyburn-Mason syndrome (WMS) is a neurocutaneous disorder consisting of vascular malformations of the brain, eye, and skin. These include characteristically high-flow intracranial and intraorbital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that present commonly with visual deterioration, headache, and hemiplegia. Complete removal of these lesions is challenging. Most patients are followed closely, and intervention occurs only in the setting of worsening symptoms secondary to AVM growth or hemorrhage. Here the authors present the first known case of a patient with WMS and a pituitary macroadenoma.

OBSERVATIONS

A 62-year-old man with a 30-year history of WMS with right basal ganglia and orbital AVMs and right eye blindness presented for new-onset left-sided vision loss. A pituitary adenoma was identified compressing the optic chiasm and left optic nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography studies were obtained for surgical planning, and the patient underwent an endoscopic transnasal transsphenoidal resection, with significant postoperative vision improvement.

LESSONS

Given the variable presentation and poor characterization of this rare syndrome, patients with WMS presenting with new symptoms must undergo evaluation for growth and hemorrhage of known AVMs, as well as new lesions. Further, in patients undergoing intracranial surgery, extensive preoperative imaging and planning are crucial for safe and successful procedures.

Open access

Repair of internal carotid artery injury with aneurysm clip during endoscopic endonasal surgery: illustrative case

David Fustero de Miguel, Laura Beatriz López López, Amanda Avedillo Ruidíaz, Javier Orduna Martínez, Juan Casado Pellejero, and Jesús Adrián Moles Herbera

BACKGROUND

One of the most feared and dangerous scenarios that can appear during an endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) is the iatrogenic injury of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Several methods, along with a variety of outcomes, have been described to deal with this complication. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the use of a Yasargil-type aneurysm clip to solve an ICA injury, preserving the artery’s patency and having a long-term follow-up. The authors discuss the advantages and disadvantages of other vessel preservation techniques compared with clipping.

OBSERVATIONS

A visually impaired 56-year-old woman was diagnosed with a giant nonfunctional pituitary tumor that invaded the sphenoidal sinus, anterior and posterior ethmoidal cells, and both cavernous sinuses, with suprasellar extension and optochiasmatic compression. The patient underwent EES, and during the final resection phase her left ICA was injured, with massive hemorrhage.

LESSONS

ICA injury during endoscopic skull base surgery carries high mortality and morbidity; it is essential to maintain carotid flow when possible to avoid short-term and long-term consequences. There are several techniques depicted in the literature to deal with this situation. The authors report the use of a Yasargil mini-clip to deal with the injury for a positive outcome: primary hemostasis, vessel preservation, and no postoperative complications.