Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 53 items for

  • User-accessible content x
  • By Author: Lanzino, Giuseppe x
Clear All
Free access

Lorenzo Rinaldo, Harry J. Cloft, Giuseppe Lanzino and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

Free access

Giovanni Vercelli, Thomas J. Sorenson, Enrico Giordan, Giuseppe Lanzino and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

Cerebral protection device utilization during carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been demonstrated to decrease the risk of perioperative stroke. The ProximAl Protection with the MO.MA Device During CaRotid Stenting (ARMOUR) Trial had the lowest event rates of any independently adjudicated study. In this video of two cases of severe carotid artery stenosis, the authors present the nuances of the CAS procedure utilizing a dual-balloon guide catheter device (MO.MA). This device has the benefit of being in place before the lesion is crossed with any device, being able to arrest flow while the atherosclerotic lesion is crossed, and aiding in protection from distal emboli and stroke.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/0o8DlC1n6_M.

Free access

Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Giuseppe Lanzino

In elderly patients with acute ischemic stroke, tortuosity of the proximal vertebral artery makes access from the transfemoral route challenging and time consuming. In such cases, a transradial approach (TA) offers a more direct vertebral artery (VA) access that overcomes proximal VA tortuosity. In this video the authors illustrate nuances of the TA for acute basilar artery occlusion in two patients with challenging proximal VA anatomy. Techniques, devices, and pitfalls are discussed. In both patients, mechanical clot retrieval was successful and resulted in significant recovery of function. The authors believe that the TA should be the initial approach for basilar artery (BA) occlusion management in elderly patients and should be considered for selected patients with other conditions requiring endovascular treatment.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/_Ym9tMKUy_4.

Free access

Waleed Brinjikji, Harry J. Cloft, Giuseppe Lanzino, Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Pearse P. Morris

Arteriovenous fistulae of the internal maxillary artery are exceedingly rare, with less than 30 cases reported in the literature. Most of these lesions are congenital, iatrogenic, or posttraumatic. The most common presentation of internal maxillary artery fistulae is pulsatile tinnitus and headache. Because these lesions are single-hole fistulae, they can be easily cured with endovascular techniques. The authors present a case of a patient who presented to their institution with a several-year history of pulsatile tinnitus who was found to have an internal maxillary artery arteriovenous fistula, which was treated endovascularly with transarterial coil and Onyx embolization.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/fDZVMMwpwRc.

Full access

Lorenzo Rinaldo, Brandon A. McCutcheon, Meghan E. Murphy, Daniel L. Shepherd, Patrick R. Maloney, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Mohamad Bydon and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

The mechanism by which greater institutional case volume translates into improved outcomes after surgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is not well established. The authors thus aimed to assess the effect of case volume on the rate of various types of complications after clipping of UIAs.

METHODS

Using information on the outcomes of inpatient admissions for surgical clipping of UIAs collected within a national database, the relationship of institutional case volume to the incidence of different types of complications after clipping was investigated. Complications were subdivided into different categories, which included all complications, ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, medical complications, infectious complications, complications related to anesthesia, and wound complications. The relationship of case volume to different types of complications was assessed using linear regression analysis. The relationships between case volume and overall complication and stroke rates were fit with both linear and quadratic equations. The numerical cutoff for institutional case volume above and below which the authors found the greatest differences in mean overall complication and stroke rate was determined using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis.

RESULTS

Between October 2012 and September 2015, 125 health care institutions reported patient outcomes from a total of 6040 cases of clipping of UIAs. On linear regression analysis, increasing case volume was negatively correlated to both overall complications (r2 = 0.046, p = 0.0234) and stroke (r2 = 0.029, p = 0.0557) rate, although the relationship of case volume to the complication (r2 = 0.092) and stroke (r2 = 0.067) rate was better fit with a quadratic equation. On CART analysis, the cutoff for the case number that yielded the greatest difference in overall complications and stroke rate between higher- or lower-volume centers was 6 cases/year and 3 cases/year, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the authors confirm that increasing case volume is associated with reduced complications after clipping of UIAs, their results suggest that the relationship between case volume and complications is not necessarily linear. Moreover, these results indicate that the effect of case volume on outcome is most evident between very-low-volume centers relative to centers with a medium-to-high volume.

Full access

Waleed Brinjikji, Vivek N. Iyer, Christopher P. Wood and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are known to suffer from high rates of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature examining prevalence rates, characteristics, and clinical presentation of cerebral AVMs in the HHT population.

METHODS

To identify studies on AVM prevalence and characteristics in the HHT population, 4 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science) were searched by a reference librarian with over 30 years experience in systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The search period was January 1, 1990–March 2016. The following search terms were used: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, AVM, brain AVM, arteriovenous malformation, arteriovenous fistula, prevalence, and epidemiology. The authors identified studies that examined the prevalence rates, characteristics, and clinical presentation of cerebral AVMs in patients with HHT. They assessed overall AVM prevalence rates as well as prevalence rates by age, sex, HHT type, and country/region. They also systematically reviewed the characteristics of AVMs, including rupture status, location, clinical presentation, angioarchitecture, and Spetzler-Martin grade. Data were analyzed using a random-effects meta-analysis model.

RESULTS

Thirty-nine studies were included in this meta-analysis. Thirty studies examined brain AVM prevalence rates in various HHT patient populations, and 18 studies examined AVM clinical and angiographic characteristics (9 studies examined both prevalence rates and AVM characteristics). The prevalence of brain AVMs in HHT patients was 10.4% (95% CI 7.9%–13.0%) with no significant difference between males (8.5%, 95% CI 4.9%–12.0%) and females (11.0%, 95% CI 5.9%–16.1%). Patients with HHT Type 1 (HHT1) had a significantly higher brain AVM prevalence (13.4%, 95% CI 9.5%–17.4%) compared with those with HHT Type 2 (HHT2) (2.4%, 95% CI 1.0%–3.8%) (p < 0.0001). In 55.2% (95% CI 38.3%–72.1%) of cases, the AVMs were symptomatic. Spetzler-Martin grade was 2 or less in 86.9% (95% CI 67.5%–95.2%) of patients.

CONCLUSIONS

The prevalence of brain AVMs in the HHT population is about 10%. HHT1 patients are significantly more likely to have brain AVMs than HHT2 patients. Most AVMs in the HHT population are symptomatic. The Spetzler-Martin grade for these lesions is 2 or less in nearly 90% of patients.

Full access

Tibor Becske, Matthew B. Potts, Maksim Shapiro, David F. Kallmes, Waleed Brinjikji, Isil Saatci, Cameron G. McDougall, István Szikora, Giuseppe Lanzino, Christopher J. Moran, Henry H. Woo, Demetrius K. Lopes, Aaron L. Berez, Daniel J. Cher, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Elad I. Levy, Felipe C. Albuquerque, David J. Fiorella, Zsolt Berentei, Miklós Marosföi, Saruhan H. Cekirge and Peter K. Nelson

OBJECTIVE

The long-term effectiveness of endovascular treatment of large and giant wide-neck aneurysms using traditional endovascular techniques has been disappointing, with high recanalization and re-treatment rates. Flow diversion with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) has been recently used as a stand-alone therapy for complex aneurysms, showing significant improvement in effectiveness while demonstrating a similar safety profile to stent-supported coil treatment. However, relatively little is known about its long-term safety and effectiveness. Here the authors report on the 3-year safety and effectiveness of flow diversion with the PED in a prospective cohort of patients with large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysms enrolled in the Pipeline for Uncoilable or Failed Aneurysms (PUFS) trial.

METHODS

The PUFS trial is a prospective study of 107 patients with 109 aneurysms treated with the PED. Primary effectiveness and safety end points were demonstrated based on independently monitored 180-day clinical and angiographic data. Patients were enrolled in a long-term follow-up protocol including 1-, 3-, and 5-year clinical and imaging follow-up. In this paper, the authors report the midstudy (3-year) effectiveness and safety data.

RESULTS

At 3 years posttreatment, 74 subjects with 76 aneurysms underwent catheter angiography as required per protocol. Overall, complete angiographic aneurysm occlusion was observed in 71 of these 76 aneurysms (93.4% cure rate). Five aneurysms were re-treated, using either coils or additional PEDs, for failure to occlude, and 3 of these 5 were cured by the 3-year follow-up. Angiographic cure with one or two treatments of Pipeline embolization alone was therefore achieved in 92.1%. No recanalization of a previously completely occluded aneurysm was noted on the 3-year angiograms. There were 3 (2.6%) delayed device- or aneurysm-related serious adverse events, none of which led to permanent neurological sequelae. No major or minor late-onset hemorrhagic or ischemic cerebrovascular events or neurological deaths were observed in the 6-month through 3-year posttreatment period. Among 103 surviving patients, 85 underwent functional outcome assessment in which modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–1 were demonstrated in 80 subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

Pipeline embolization is safe and effective in the treatment of complex large and giant aneurysms of the intracranial internal carotid artery. Unlike more traditional endovascular treatments, flow diversion results in progressive vascular remodeling that leads to complete aneurysm obliteration over longer-term follow-up without delayed aneurysm recanalization and/or growth.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00777088 (clinicaltrials.gov)

Full access

Lorenzo Rinaldo, Brandon A. McCutcheon, Meghan E. Murphy, Mohamad Bydon, Alejandro A. Rabinstein and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

Hypoplasia of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery is frequently observed in patients with anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. The effect of this anatomical variant on ACoA aneurysm morphology is not well understood.

METHODS

Digital subtraction angiography images were reviewed for 204 patients presenting to the authors' institution with either a ruptured or an unruptured ACoA aneurysm. The ratio of the width of the larger A1 segment to the smaller A1 segment was calculated. Patients with an A1 ratio greater than 2 were categorized as having A1 segment hypoplasia. The relationship of A1 segment hypoplasia to both patient and aneurysm characteristics was then assessed.

RESULTS

Of 204 patients that presented with an ACoA aneurysm, 34 (16.7%) were found to have a hypoplastic A1. Patients with A1 segment hypoplasia were less likely to have a history of smoking (44.1% vs 62.9%, p = 0.0410). ACoA aneurysms occurring in the setting of a hypoplastic A1 were also found to have a larger maximum diameter (mean 7.7 vs 6.0 mm, p = 0.0084). When considered as a continuous variable, increasing A1 ratio was associated with decreasing aneurysm dome-to-neck ratio (p = 0.0289). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of A1 segment hypoplasia between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms (18.9% vs 10.7%; p = 0.1605).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that a hypoplastic A1 may affect the morphology of ACoA aneurysms. In addition, the relative lack of traditional risk factors for aneurysm formation in patients with A1 segment hypoplasia argues for the importance of hemodynamic factors in the formation of ACoA aneurysms in this anatomical setting.

Full access

Deena M. Nasr, Waleed Brinjikji, Michelle J. Clarke and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

Spinal epidural arteriovenous fistulas (SEDAVFs) constitute a rare but treatable cause of vascular myelopathy and are a different subtype from the more common Type I spinal dural AVFs. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of SEDAVFs from a single institution and report on the clinical presentations, functional status, and treatment outcomes.

METHODS

The authors identified all SEDAVFs treated at their institution from 2005 to 2015. SEDAVFs were defined as spinal AVFs in which the fistulous connection occurred in the epidural venous plexus. The clinical presentation, functional status, immediate treatment outcomes, and long-term neurological outcomes were analyzed.

RESULTS

Twenty-four patients with SEDAVFs were included in this study. The patients' mean age at presentation was 66.9 years. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and numbness (22 patients, 91.7%), followed by lower-extremity weakness (21 patients, 87.5%). The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 11.8 months. Eighteen patients (75.0%) were treated with endovascular therapy alone, 4 (16.7) with surgery, and 2 (8.3%) with a combination of techniques. There was 1 major treatment-related complication (4.2%). Fifteen patients (62.5%) had improvement in disability, and 12 patients (54.5%) had improvement in sensory symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

SEDAVFs often present with lower-extremity motor dysfunction and sensory symptoms. With the availability of newer liquid embolic agents, these lesions can be effectively treated with endovascular techniques. Surgery is also effective at treating these lesions, especially in situations where endovascular embolization fails or is not safe and in patients presenting with mass effect from compressive varices.

Full access

Waleed Brinjikji, Kelly D. Flemming and Giuseppe Lanzino

The authors report a case of a developmentally normal child with a congenital complex torcular dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) who later, in his teenage years, developed several vermian cavernomas within a large cerebellar developmental venous anomaly (DVA). The patient had initially presented with an abnormally large head circumference but no neurological deficits. He underwent several partial embolization procedures in an attempt to decrease the blood supply of the fistula over the course of 8 years. Nine years following initial presentation, he presented with a fourth ventricular hemorrhage, due to development of a new vermian cavernoma adjacent to a previously known vermian DVA and suffered subsequent mild left-sided hemiataxia from which he later recovered. CT angiographic images demonstrated that the vermian DVA drained into the left transverse sinus, which also drained the torcular arteriovenous fistula. A routine follow-up MRI examination 10 years following initial presentation demonstrated interval development of several large cavernomas in the cerebellum, all within the DVA. The patient had no new symptoms at that time and was neurologically intact. This case report highlights the de novo development of multiple cavernous malformations potentially secondary to DAVF-induced venous congestion in a preexisting DVA.