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Enrico Giordan, Christopher S. Graffeo, Alejandro A. Rabinstein, Robert D. Brown Jr., Walter A. Rocca, Alanna M. Chamberlain and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

Recent population-based and hospital cohort studies have reported a decreasing incidence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and declining aSAH-associated case-fatality rates. Principal drivers of these trends are debated, but improvements in smoking cessation and hypertension control may be critical factors.

METHODS

The population-based medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiological Project was used to document aSAH incidence and 30-day case fatality rates during a 20-year study period (1996–2016) in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Incidence rates in the study period were compared with data from a previous Olmsted County study concerning aSAH incidence from 1965 to 1995 and with regional trends in tobacco use.

RESULTS

One hundred nineteen incident cases of aSAH were included. The median age at hemorrhage was 59 years (range 16–94 years), and 74 patients were female (62.2%). The overall average annual aSAH incidence rate was 4.2/100,000 person-years (P-Y). The aSAH incidence rate decreased from 5.7/100,000 in 1996 to 3.5/100,000 P-Y in 2011–2016. The overall aSAH-associated 30-day case-fatality rate was 21.9% and declined by approximately 0.5% annually. An accelerated decline in the fatality rate (0.9%/year) was observed from 2006–2016. Smoking among adult Olmsted County residents decreased from 20.4% in 2000 to 9.1% in 2018.

CONCLUSIONS

A decline in the incidence of aSAH and 30-day case-fatality rate from 1996 to 2016 was observed, as well as an accelerated decline of the fatality rate from 2006 to 2016. These findings confirm and extend the trends reported by prior studies in the same population. The decrease in aSAH in the years studied paralleled a noticeable reduction in the population smoking rates.

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Waleed Brinjikji, Elisa Colombo and Giuseppe Lanzino

OBJECTIVE

Vascular malformations of the cervical spine are exceedingly rare. To date there have been no large case series describing the clinical presentation and angioarchitectural characteristics of cervical spine vascular malformations. The authors report their institutional case series on cervical spine vascular malformations diagnosed and treated at their institution.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed all patients with spinal vascular malformations from their institution from January 2001 to December 2018. Patients with vascular malformations of the cervical spine were included. Lesions were characterized by their angioarchitectural characteristics by an interventional neuroradiologist and endovascular neurosurgeon. Data were collected on clinical presentation, imaging findings, treatment outcomes, and long-term follow-up. Descriptive statistics are reported.

RESULTS

Of a total of 213 patients with spinal vascular malformations, 27 (12.7%) had vascular malformations in the cervical spine. The mean patient age was 46.1 ± 21.9 years and 16 (59.3%) were male. The most common presentations were lower-extremity weakness (13 patients, 48.1%), tetraparesis (8 patients, 29.6%), and lower-extremity sensory dysfunction (7 patients, 25.9%). Nine patients (33.3%) presented with hemorrhage. Fifteen patients (55.6%) had modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–2 at the time of diagnosis. Regarding angioarchitectural characteristics, 8 patients (29.6%) had intramedullary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), 5 (18.5%) had epidural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs), 4 (14.8%) had paraspinal fistulas, 4 (14.8%) had mixed epidural/intradural fistulas, 3 (11.1%) had perimedullary AVMs, 2 (7.4%) had dural fistulas, and 1 patient (3.7%) had a perimedullary AVF.

CONCLUSIONS

This retrospective study of 27 patients with cervical spine vascular malformations is the largest series to date on these lesions. The authors found substantial angioarchitectural heterogeneity with the most common types being intramedullary AVMs followed by epidural AVFs, paraspinal fistulas, and mixed intradural/extradural fistulas. Angioarchitecture dictated the clinical presentation as intradural shunts were more likely to present with hemorrhage and acute onset myelopathy, while dural and extradural shunts presented as either incidental lesions or gradually progressive congestive myelopathy.

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Vance T. Lehman, Petrice M. Cogswell, Lorenzo Rinaldo, Waleed Brinjikji, John Huston III, James P. Klaas and Giuseppe Lanzino

Numerous recent technological advances offer the potential to substantially enhance the MRI evaluation of moyamoya disease (MMD). These include high-resolution volumetric imaging, high-resolution vessel wall characterization, improved cerebral angiographic and perfusion techniques, high-field imaging, fast scanning methods, and artificial intelligence. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art MRI applications in these realms, emphasizing key imaging findings, clinical utility, and areas that will benefit from further investigation. Although these techniques may apply to imaging of a wide array of neurovascular or other neurological conditions, consideration of their application to MMD is useful given the comprehensive multidimensional MRI assessment used to evaluate MMD. These MRI techniques span from basic cross-sectional to advanced functional sequences, both qualitative and quantitative.

The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary and analysis of current key relevant literature of advanced MRI techniques for the evaluation of MMD with image-rich case examples. These imaging methods can aid clinical characterization, help direct treatment, assist in the evaluation of treatment response, and potentially improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of MMD.

Open access

Salomon Cohen-Cohen, Giuseppe Lanzino and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

The extended retrosigmoid approach provides an excellent corridor to the lateral aspect of the pontomedullary junction (PMJ)., This video demonstrates a microsurgical resection of a progressive enlarging cavernous malformation (CM) of the PMJ. The patient is a 33-year-old woman with progressive symptoms, including right facial droop, left hemianesthesia, diplopia, and nystagmus. The patient underwent a right extended retrosigmoid approach with intraoperative neuronavigation and neuromonitoring. Lower cranial nerve dissection allowed access to the lateral PMJ. A longitudinal corticotomy was performed above the glossopharyngeal. The CM was removed in a piecemeal fashion. Postoperative MRI confirmed gross-total resection and the patient remained neurologically stable.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/K_TtiTo1RsQ.

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Thomas J. Sorenson, Lucio De Maria, Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Giuseppe Lanzino

Craniocervical junction dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are rare vascular lesions with a potentially dangerous natural history due to the onset of neurological deficit secondary to intracranial hemorrhage or myelopathy due to venous congestion. Despite advances in endovascular techniques, many dAVFs located in this area continue to require surgical treatment as embolization is often not feasible or safe. In this video, the authors illustrate a patient with a symptomatic craniocervical junction dAVF who had undergone attempted Onyx embolization at another institution. Because of persistent filling of the fistula and worsening myelopathy after the previous attempt, the patient was referred to the authors’ clinic for definitive surgical treatment. The video illustrates the typical location of the early draining vein in most craniocervical junction dAVFs immediately below the emergence of the vertebral artery from the dura. The patient underwent successful definitive clip ligation of the fistula, which was exposed through a lateral suboccipital craniotomy.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Bvg6VKLgwO0.

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Lorenzo Rinaldo, Harry J. Cloft, Giuseppe Lanzino and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

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Giovanni Vercelli, Thomas J. Sorenson, Enrico Giordan, Giuseppe Lanzino and Leonardo Rangel-Castilla

Cerebral protection device utilization during carotid artery stenting (CAS) has been demonstrated to decrease the risk of perioperative stroke. The ProximAl Protection with the MO.MA Device During CaRotid Stenting (ARMOUR) Trial had the lowest event rates of any independently adjudicated study. In this video of two cases of severe carotid artery stenosis, the authors present the nuances of the CAS procedure utilizing a dual-balloon guide catheter device (MO.MA). This device has the benefit of being in place before the lesion is crossed with any device, being able to arrest flow while the atherosclerotic lesion is crossed, and aiding in protection from distal emboli and stroke.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/0o8DlC1n6_M.

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Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Giuseppe Lanzino

In elderly patients with acute ischemic stroke, tortuosity of the proximal vertebral artery makes access from the transfemoral route challenging and time consuming. In such cases, a transradial approach (TA) offers a more direct vertebral artery (VA) access that overcomes proximal VA tortuosity. In this video the authors illustrate nuances of the TA for acute basilar artery occlusion in two patients with challenging proximal VA anatomy. Techniques, devices, and pitfalls are discussed. In both patients, mechanical clot retrieval was successful and resulted in significant recovery of function. The authors believe that the TA should be the initial approach for basilar artery (BA) occlusion management in elderly patients and should be considered for selected patients with other conditions requiring endovascular treatment.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/_Ym9tMKUy_4.

Free access

Waleed Brinjikji, Harry J. Cloft, Giuseppe Lanzino, Leonardo Rangel-Castilla and Pearse P. Morris

Arteriovenous fistulae of the internal maxillary artery are exceedingly rare, with less than 30 cases reported in the literature. Most of these lesions are congenital, iatrogenic, or posttraumatic. The most common presentation of internal maxillary artery fistulae is pulsatile tinnitus and headache. Because these lesions are single-hole fistulae, they can be easily cured with endovascular techniques. The authors present a case of a patient who presented to their institution with a several-year history of pulsatile tinnitus who was found to have an internal maxillary artery arteriovenous fistula, which was treated endovascularly with transarterial coil and Onyx embolization.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/fDZVMMwpwRc.

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Giovanni G. Vercelli, Norbert G. Campeau, Thanila A. Macedo, Elliot T. Dawson and Giuseppe Lanzino

A carotid web is a shelf-like intraluminal filling defect typically arising from the posterolateral wall of the proximal internal carotid artery. It is recognized as a possible cause of ischemic stroke in young adults. However, its etiopathogenesis is controversial and remains to be fully elucidated. The authors report de novo formation of a carotid web from an intimal dissection documented on serial imaging studies. The findings in this case suggest that a focal intimal dissection could be the underlying cause of a carotid web. Lower shear stress at the posterolateral wall of the proximal internal carotid artery is hypothesized to be a predisposing factor and explains the predilection of a carotid web for this specific location.