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Analysis of YouTube videos on hydrocephalus in the local language: matching content with the needs of caregivers

Jinno Jenkin Sy, Angelica Mea, John Carlo B. Reyes, and Ronnie E. Baticulon

OBJECTIVE

Studies that evaluate YouTube videos on hydrocephalus often exclude non–English-language videos, even though hydrocephalus is more prevalent in low- and middle-income countries where English may not be widely understood. This study had two aims: to analyze the engagement, content, and quality of YouTube videos on hydrocephalus in the Filipino language, and to determine whether the videos’ content matched the information needs of caregivers of children with hydrocephalus in the Philippines.

METHODS

The authors conducted an online survey among caregivers of patients with hydrocephalus, recruited through the Facebook page of the Hydrocephalus Foundation of the Philippines Inc. Data on demographics, social media use, and language and content preferences were collected. In parallel, the authors systematically evaluated the engagement and content of three groups of YouTube videos on hydrocephalus: 1) most viewed Filipino-language videos, 2) most viewed English-language videos, and 3) same-age English-language videos, matched to the first group based on upload date. The quality of the Filipino-language videos was assessed using the DISCERN criteria.

RESULTS

Among 280 respondents, 91% watched videos on hydrocephalus online and 89% preferred videos in Filipino. Compared with same-age English videos, Filipino videos had greater engagement, indicated by a higher median number of likes (40 vs 8, p = 0.005) and comments (8.5 vs 1, p = 0.007). English and Filipino videos emphasized similar topics on hydrocephalus, but the latter were more likely to discuss treatment cost and to solicit donations. Caregivers were most interested in the long-term care of patients with hydrocephalus, discussed only in 10 of 72 videos (14%) overall. The mean DISCERN score for Filipino videos was 30.1 ± 7.7, indicating poor quality.

CONCLUSIONS

There is a gap between the information needs of Filipino caregivers and the content of YouTube videos on hydrocephalus. Neurosurgeons can serve as creators, resource persons, or curators of content, ensuring that up-to-date, accurate, and credible health information on hydrocephalus is available to caregivers in their preferred language.

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Pediatric neurosurgery in Asia and Australasia: training and clinical practice

Ronnie E. Baticulon, Michael C. Dewan, Nunthasiri Wittayanakorn, Philipp R. Aldana, and Wirginia J. Maixner

OBJECTIVE

There are limited data on the pediatric neurosurgical workforce in Asia and Australasia. The training and clinical practice of pediatric neurosurgeons need to be characterized in order to identify gaps in knowledge and skills, thereby establishing a framework from which to elevate pediatric neurosurgical care in the region.

METHODS

An online survey for pediatric neurosurgeons was created in REDCap (Research Electronic Database Capture), collecting demographic information and data on pediatric neurosurgical training and clinical practice. The link to answer the survey was sent to the mailing lists of the Asian Australasian Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery and the Japanese Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery, disseminated during the 2019 Asian Australasian Pediatric Neurosurgery Congress, and spread through social media. The survey was open to neurosurgeons who operated on patients ≤ 18 years old in Asian Australasian countries, whether or not they had completed fellowship training in pediatric neurosurgery. Descriptive statistics were computed and tabulated. Data were stratified and compared based on surgeon training and World Bank income group.

RESULTS

A total of 155 valid survey responses were analyzed, representing neurosurgeons from 21 countries. A total of 107 (69%) considered themselves pediatric neurosurgeons, of whom 66 (43%) had completed pediatric neurosurgery training. Neurosurgeons in East Asia commonly undergo a fellowship in their home countries, whereas the rest train mostly in North America, Europe, and Australia. A majority (89%) had operating privileges, and subspecialty pediatric training usually lasted from 6 months to 2 years. On average, trained pediatric neurosurgeons perform a higher number of pediatric neurosurgical operations per year compared with nonpediatric-trained respondents (131 ± 129 vs 56 ± 64 [mean ± SD], p = 0.0001). The mean number of total neurosurgical operations per year is similar for both groups (184 ± 129 vs 178 ± 142 [mean ± SD], p = 0.80). Respondents expressed the desire to train further in pediatric epilepsy, spasticity, vascular malformations, craniofacial disorders, and brain tumors.

CONCLUSIONS

Both pediatric and general neurosurgeons provide neurosurgical care to children in Asia and Australasia. There is a need to increase pediatric neurosurgery fellowship programs in the region. Skill sets and training needs in pediatric neurosurgery vary depending on the country’s economic status and between pediatric-trained and nonpediatric-trained surgeons.