Browse

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Surgical management of metastatic Hürthle cell carcinoma to the skull base, cortex, and spine: illustrative case

N. U. Farrukh Hameed, Meagan M Hoppe, Ahmed Habib, Jeffrey Head, Regan Shanahan, Bradley A Gross, Sandra Narayanan, Georgios Zenonos, and Pascal Zinn

BACKGROUND

Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCC) is an unusual and aggressive variant of the follicular type of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), accounting for less than 3% of DTCs but posing the highest risk of metastasis. Brain metastases are uncommonly reported in the literature but pose a poor prognosis. The low rate of brain metastases from HCC coupled with ambiguous treatment protocols for the extracranial disease complicate successful disease management and definitive treatment strategy. The authors present the case of a patient with HCC metastasis to the skull base, cortex, and spine with recent tibial metastasis.

OBSERVATIONS

Despite the presence of metastasis to the cortex, skull base, and spine, the patient responded very well to radiation therapy, sellar mass resection, and cervical spine decompression and fixation and has made a remarkable recovery.

LESSONS

The authors’ multidisciplinary approach to the patient’s care, including a diverse team of specialists from oncology, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, radiology, endocrinology, and collaboration with clinical trial researchers, was fundamental to her successful outcome, demonstrating the utility of intersecting specialties in successful outcomes in neuro-oncological patient care.

Open access

Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumor between the suboccipital bone and posterior C1 arch: illustrative case

Carl Porto, Cameron Ayala, Joshua Feler, Santos Santos-Fontanez, Jonathan Poggi, Michael Kritselis, and Curtis Doberstein

BACKGROUND

Tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) occurs most commonly in the appendicular skeleton and is only rarely found in the vertebral column. Lesions of the craniocervical junction are particularly rare, with only 4 cases reported in the literature. The authors describe the case of a diffuse-type TGCT at the craniocervical junction.

OBSERVATIONS

A patient presented with a 1-year history of right-sided neck pain and bilateral neurological symptoms in the distribution of the right occipital nerve. A 20-mm homogeneously contrast-enhancing mass in the suboccipital and posterior C1 region was discovered on magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine. The tumor was operated on via a posterior approach, and gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed a diffuse-type TGCT. The patient had an uneventful recovery.

LESSONS

TGCT can arise at the craniocervical junction and is easily misdiagnosed because of its rare occurrence. IHC examination of a tumor specimen should be done to confirm the diagnosis. GTR is the objective when treating these tumors, especially when they are the diffuse type, as they have a high recurrence rate. Radiation and small-molecule therapies are viable postoperative therapies if GTR cannot be achieved or in cases of recurrence.

Open access

En bloc resection of a high cervical chordoma followed by reconstruction with a free vascularized fibular graft: illustrative case

Zachariah W. Pinter, Eric J. Moore, Peter S. Rose, Ahmad N. Nassr, and Bradford L. Currier

BACKGROUND

Wide excision of chordoma provides better local control than intralesional resection or definitive radiotherapy. The en bloc excision of high cervical chordomas is a challenging endeavor because of the complex anatomy of this region and limited reconstructive options.

OBSERVATIONS

This is the first case report to describe reconstruction with a free vascularized fibular graft following the en bloc excision of a chordoma involving C1–3.

LESSONS

This report demonstrates the durability of this construct at 10-year follow-up and is the first case report demonstrating satisfactory long-term oncological outcomes after a true margin-negative resection of a high cervical chordoma.