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Open access

Cervicothoracic ventral-dorsal rhizotomy for bilateral upper-extremity hypertonia in cerebral palsy: illustrative case

Ryan Kelly, Hanna R Kemeny, Sunny Abdelmageed, Robin Trierweiler, Tim Krater, Melissa A LoPresti, and Jeffrey S Raskin

BACKGROUND

Management of medically refractory limb-specific hypertonia is challenging. Neurosurgical options include deep brain stimulation, intrathecal baclofen, thalamotomy, pallidotomy, or rhizotomy. Cervical dorsal rhizotomy has been successful in the treatment of upper-extremity spasticity. Cervical ventral and cervical ventral-dorsal rhizotomy (VDR) has been used in the treatment or torticollis and traumatic hypertonia; however, the use of cervicothoracic VDR for the treatment of upper-extremity mixed hypertonia is not well described.

OBSERVATIONS

A 9-year-old girl with severe quadriplegic mixed hypertonia secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) underwent cervicothoracic VDR. Modified Ashworth Scale scores, provision of caregiving, and examination improved. Treatment was well tolerated.

LESSONS

Cervicothoracic VDR can afford symptomatic and quality of life improvement in patients with medically refractory limb hypertonia. Intraoperative positioning and nuances in surgical techniques are particularly important based on spinal cord position as modified by scoliosis. Here, the first successful use of cervicothoracic VDR for the treatment of medically refractory upper-limb hypertonia in a pediatric patient with CP is described.

Open access

First use of intraventricular nicardipine in a pediatric patient with vasospasm secondary to meningitis: illustrative case

V. Jane Horak, Nirali Patel, Sunny Abdelmageed, Jonathan Scoville, Melissa A LoPresti, and Sandi Lam

BACKGROUND

Cerebral vasospasm is commonly associated with adult aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage but can develop in children. The standard vasospasm treatment includes induced hypertension, avoidance of hypovolemia, systemic use of the calcium channel blocker (CCB) nimodipine, and cerebral angiography for intraarterial therapy. Emerging treatments in adults, such as intraventricular CCB administration, have not been investigated in children. This study demonstrates the successful use of an intraventricular CCB in a pediatric patient with refractory vasospasm secondary to meningitis.

OBSERVATIONS

A 12-year-old female presented with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and ventriculitis with refractory symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. She received a 5-day course of intrathecal nicardipine through an existing external ventricular drain. Her clinical status, transcranial Doppler studies, and radiography improved. Treatment was well tolerated.

LESSONS

Pediatric vasospasm is uncommon and potentially devastating. The management of vasospasm in adults occurs frequently. Principles of this management are adapted to pediatric care given the rarity of vasospasm in children. The use of intraventricular nicardipine has been reported in the care of adults with level 3 evidence. It has not been adequately reported in children with refractory vasospasm. Here, the first use of intraventricular nicardipine in treating pediatric cerebral vasospasm in the setting of meningitis is described and highlighted.

Open access

Posterior-only 2-level vertebrectomy and fusion in a medically complex patient with lumbar metastasis: illustrative case

Ryan Johnson, Annabelle Shaffer, Ashley Tang, Kathryn Tsai, Gina Guglielmi, and Paul M Arnold

BACKGROUND

Spinal metastases are commonly seen in patients with cancer and often indicate a poor prognosis. Treatment can include curative or palliative surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The surgical approach varies widely on the basis of the affected region of the spine, the location of the tumor (anterior versus posterior), the goal of surgery, the health of the patient, and surgeon preference.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of a 68-year-old male with intractable lower-back pain and substantially diminished ambulation. Diagnostic imaging revealed a lumbar metastasis from a cholangiocarcinoma primary at L2–3 (4.5 cm anteroposterior × 5.7 cm transverse × 7.0 cm craniocaudal). The patient underwent a 2-level vertebrectomy with expandable cage placement and T10 to S2 fusion via a posterior-only approach. The patient regained much of his mobility and quality of life after the surgery.

LESSONS

Although this was a high-risk surgery, the authors show that a posterior-only approach can be used for lumbar vertebrectomies and fusion when necessary. Palliative surgeries carrying a high risk, especially in the setting of a limited prognosis, should include multidisciplinary deliberations and a thorough discussion of the risks and outcome expectations with the patient.

Open access

Adhesive arachnoiditis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intradural extramedullary thoracic cavernoma: illustrative case

Agne Andriuskeviciute, Michel Gustavo Mondragón-Soto, Nicolas Penet, and Juan Barges-Coll

BACKGROUND

Spinal arachnoiditis can result from various factors, including spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (sSAH). In this paper, the authors describe a case of intradural extramedullary cavernoma with an initial presentation of subarachnoid hemorrhage leading to multilevel spinal arachnoiditis to discuss the pathophysiology and optimal treatment strategy.

OBSERVATIONS

Spinal intradural extramedullary cavernoma manifesting with sSAH is a rare clinical presentation; therefore, there is no clear strategy for the management of sSAH. Spinal arachnoiditis is a result of chronic inflammation of the pia arachnoid layer due to hematomyelia. No effective treatment that interrupts this inflammatory cascade and would also prevent the development of spinal arachnoiditis has been described to date.

LESSONS

Lumbar drainage could aid in sSAH management, relieve spinal cord compression, and restore the normal spinal cerebrospinal fluid circulation gradient. It could help to clear the blood degradation products rapidly and prevent early inflammatory arachnoiditis development. Mini-invasive intrathecal endoscopic adhesiolysis appears to be a reasonable approach for reducing the risk of aggravating spinal arachnoiditis with a mechanical-surgical stimulus. Whether a conservative approach should be applied in these patients with mild myelopathy symptoms is still debatable.

Open access

Immunocompetent isolated cerebral mucormycosis presenting with obstructive hydrocephalus: illustrative case

Khoa N Nguyen, Lindsey M Freeman, Timothy H Ung, Steven Ojemann, and Fabio Grassia

BACKGROUND

Isolated cerebral mucormycosis is rare in immunocompetent adults and is only sparsely reported to be associated with obstructive hydrocephalus.

OBSERVATIONS

Here, the authors report a case of obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to central nervous system mucormycosis without other systems or rhino-orbital involvement and its technical surgical management. A 23-year-old, incarcerated, immunocompetent patient with history of intravenous (IV) drug use presented with syncope. Although clinical and radiographic findings failed to elucidate an infectious pathology, endoscopy revealed an obstructive mass lesion at the level of the third ventricle, which, on microbiological testing, was confirmed to be Rhizopus fungal ventriculitis. Perioperative cerebrospinal fluid diversion, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, endoscopic biopsy technique, patient outcomes, and the literature are reviewed here. The patient received intrathecal and IV amphotericin B followed by a course of oral antifungal treatment and currently remains in remission.

LESSONS

The patient’s unique presentation and diagnosis of isolated cerebral mucormycosis reveal this pathogen as a cause of ventriculitis and obstructive hydrocephalus in immunocompetent adult patients, even in the absence of infectious sequelae on neuroimaging.

Open access

Impact of intraoperative cortical indocyanine green extravasation on local vasogenic edema immediately after direct revascularization in an adult with moyamoya disease: illustrative case

Maeho Yamasaki, Masaki Ito, Haruto Uchino, Taku Sugiyama, and Miki Fujimura

BACKGROUND

Local vasogenic edema induced after direct revascularization in moyamoya disease (MMD) is associated with blood–brain barrier dysfunction, potentially leading to postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion (CHP) or delayed intracerebral hemorrhage. This phenomenon allows the leakage of fluids, proteins, and other substances from the blood vessels into the extracellular compartment. Typically, such edema is observed postoperatively rather than intraoperatively.

OBSERVATIONS

A 48-year-old female with ischemic-onset MMD underwent revascularization on her left hemisphere with Suzuki’s angiographic stage III. Direct bypass was successfully performed, as confirmed by intravenous indocyanine green (ICG) video angiography. Subsequently, ICG extravasation was observed near the anastomosis site, despite the absence of cortical injury or bleeding under white light microscopy. Postoperative radiological imaging showed reversible pure vasogenic edema in the corresponding area, with no evidence of CHP. The patient did not exhibit neurological deterioration and was discharged home on postoperative day 16.

LESSONS

ICG, characterized by low molecular weight, water solubility, and high affinity with plasma proteins, can extravasate, serving as a direct indication of local vasogenic edema induced by direct revascularization in MMD. To enhance comprehension of the vulnerability of the blood–brain barrier in MMD, it is advisable to gather cases with prolonged observations of ICG video angiography after direct revascularization.

Open access

Optimization of direct cortical stimulation using tibial versus median nerve sensory mapping during midline brain tumor resection: illustrative case

Denmark Mugutso, Charles Warnecke, Lee Eric Tessler, Christopher J Pace, and Marat V Avshalumov

BACKGROUND

During brain tumor resection, neurophysiological mapping and monitoring help surgeons locate, characterize, and functionally assess eloquent brain areas in real time. The selection of mapping and monitoring targets has implications for successful surgery. Here, the authors compare direct cortical stimulation (DCS) as suggested by median nerve (MN) with posterior tibial nerve (PTN) cortical sensory mapping (SM) during mesial lesion resection.

OBSERVATIONS

Recordings from a 6-contact cortical strip served to generate an MN and a PTN sensory map, which indicated the strip was anterior to the central sulcus. Responses exhibited an amplitude gradient with no phase reversal (PR). DCS, elicited through a stimulus probe or contact(s) of the strip, yielded larger responses from the corresponding sensory mapped limb; that is, PTN SM resulted in larger lower limb muscle responses than those suggested by MN SM.

LESSONS

SM of the MN and PTN is effective for localizing eloquent cortical areas wherein the PTN is favored in surgery for mesial cortical tumors. The recorded amplitude of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential is a valuable criterion for defining the optimal location for DCS, despite an absent PR. The pathway at risk dictates the specifics of SM, which subsequently defines the optimal location for DCS.

Open access

Electric burn of the skull: treatment by applying trepanations and wound dressing. Illustrative case

Sergio M Georgeto, Marcio F Lehmann, Adriano T Antonucci, Marcel Schiavini, Shiro M. A Shimoakoishi, Anibal R Neto, Lutero C. M Santos, Dalmo G Correia, Murilo Scapin, and Eloah S Marcilio

BACKGROUND

Although electric injuries to human tissue are uncommon in contemporary times, their occurrence implies a high degree of morbidity and mortality. These are primarily attributed to the impact of electric current on cellular membranes, resulting in the disruption of ionic changes.

OBSERVATIONS

In this paper, the authors present the case of an electric burn on the skull in a 50-year-old male, treated by utilizing trepanation and daily sterile wound dressing. This approach differs from the conventional treatment involving tissue grafts.

LESSONS

Although the techniques utilized in this case are not commonly chosen as the initial treatment option, they have demonstrated effectiveness. Despite the absence of tissue flaps or grafts, satisfactory coverage of the skull cap was achieved.

Open access

Ruptured pial-pial collateral aneurysm associated with left internal carotid artery occlusion: nuances of surgical management. Illustrative case

Juan Silvestre G Pascual, Eddie Guo, Runze Yang, Kristopher D Langdon, Sanju Lama, and Garnette R Sutherland

BACKGROUND

Carotid occlusion often leads to the formation of a collateral network. On rare occasions, due to hemodynamic influence, aneurysms can occur. Here, the authors describe a 69-year-old male presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured aneurysm within such a network.

OBSERVATIONS

The patient presented to the emergency department with an altered level of consciousness. Imaging showed a left temporal lobe hemorrhage extending into the ventricle, subdural hematoma, and evidence of contrast extravasation. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an occluded left internal carotid artery with the left middle cerebral artery territory reconstituted by flow through an external carotid artery–internal carotid artery anastomosis. The latter was formed by the superficial temporal artery–superior orbital artery, as well as pial-pial collaterals from the posterior temporal artery. Notably, a 4-mm aneurysm arising from the pial-pial collateral network was identified. Surgical intervention involved a left temporal craniectomy and aneurysm excision, with special attention paid to preserving the anastomotic flow through the superficial temporal artery.

LESSONS

This case underscores the importance of recognizing and preserving collateral vascular pathways in cases of carotid occlusion with an associated aneurysm. It emphasizes the necessary balance between managing aneurysm risk and maintaining cerebral perfusion, highlighting the need for careful preoperative planning and intraoperative caution.

Open access

Combination of neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation and endovascular coil embolization for a ruptured anterior choroidal artery aneurysm in patients with moyamoya disease: illustrative cases

Kohei Uemasu, Hiroyuki Koizumi, Daisuke Yamamoto, Sumito Sato, Hideto Komai, Madoka Inukai, Takuichiro Hide, Yasushi Asari, and Toshihiro Kumabe

BACKGROUND

The treatment strategy for hemorrhagic moyamoya disease (MMD) due to a ruptured aneurysm at the distal portion of the anterior choroidal artery remains controversial. The authors successfully treated the ruptured aneurysm with neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation, followed by endovascular coil embolization.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors encountered two patients with massive hemorrhagic MMD whose MMD had already been diagnosed and who had a periventricular anastomosis due to a ruptured aneurysm of the distal portion of the anterior choroidal artery involving the periventricular anastomosis. In both cases, neuroendoscopic hematoma evacuation was performed for hemorrhagic MMD in the acute phase, followed by endovascular coil embolization of the ruptured aneurysm in the chronic phase. In both endovascular treatments, the patient’s condition was stabilized by hematoma evacuation, allowing a detailed preoperative evaluation of the anatomical findings of the vessel and functional findings of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring using continuous monitoring of motor evoked potentials to preserve motor function.

LESSONS

Combination therapy can be useful for hemorrhagic MMD in patients with diagnosed MMD with a periventricular anastomosis. Additionally, a preoperative understanding of the vascular construction and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring will aid in the successful coil embolization of aneurysms at the distal portion of the anterior choroidal artery with hemorrhagic MMD.