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Open access

Successful surgical management of a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm in a patient with Marfan syndrome: illustrative case

Fangjun Liu, Mengqing Hu, Daling Ruan, Xiaoling Ruan, Ting Lei, and Xiang’en Shi

BACKGROUND

Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder, poses unique challenges in neurosurgery, given the fragility of vascular structures. Superior cerebellar artery (SCA) aneurysms in patients with the syndrome are rare and present distinct surgical difficulties, necessitating innovative approaches.

OBSERVATIONS

A 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured SCA aneurysm. Given the lack of a defined aneurysm neck and the small diameter of the SCA, standard clipping and endovascular therapies were unsuitable. A microsurgical approach using microsutures was successfully employed, effectively managing the aneurysm while preserving the parent artery.

LESSONS

This case underscores the efficacy of the microsuture technique in complex neurosurgical scenarios, particularly in patients with connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome. The adaptability of surgical strategies, as demonstrated in this case, is crucial for achieving successful outcomes in patients with unique anatomical challenges.

Open access

A vertebrobasilar junction aneurysm successfully treated with a combination of surgical clipping and flow diverter placement based on the results of computational fluid dynamics analysis: illustrative case

Tatsuya Mori, Hidehito Kimura, Atsushi Fujita, Kosuke Hayashi, Tatsuo Hori, Masahiro Sugihara, Yusuke Ikeuchi, Masaaki Kohta, Akio Tomiyama, and Takashi Sasayama

BACKGROUND

The treatment of vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) aneurysms is challenging. Although flow diverters (FDs) are a possible treatment option, geometrical conditions hinder intervention. VBJ aneurysms possess dual inflow vessels from the bilateral vertebral arteries (VAs), one of which is ideally occluded prior to FD treatment. However, it remains unclear which VA should be occluded.

OBSERVATIONS

A 75-year-old male with a growing VBJ complex aneurysm exhibiting invagination toward the brainstem and causing perifocal edema required intervention. Preoperative computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis demonstrated that left VA occlusion would result in more stagnant flow and less impingement of flow than right VA occlusion. According to the simulated strategy, surgical clipping of the left VA just proximal to the aneurysm was performed, followed by FD placement from the basilar artery trunk to the right VA. The patient demonstrated tolerance of the VA occlusion, and follow-up computed tomography angiography at 18 months after FD treatment confirmed the disappearance of the aneurysm.

LESSONS

Preoperative flow dynamics simulations using CFD analysis can reveal an optimal treatment strategy involving a hybrid surgery that combines FD placement and direct surgical occlusion for a VBJ complex aneurysm.

Open access

Spontaneous development and involution of a de novo pseudoaneurysm at the superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery bypass anastomotic site in a patient with moyamoya disease: illustrative case

Kristine Ravina, Biraj Patel, and Benjamin Yim

BACKGROUND

De novo pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare complication of extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report the case of a 28-year-old male who presented with new-onset right temporal and occipital ischemia who was found to have bilateral proximal internal carotid artery occlusion with collateral vasculature formation consistent with moyamoya disease. The patient underwent bilateral superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery bypasses. A de novo pseudoaneurysm was found at the left-sided bypass distal anastomotic site recipient vessel 1 month after the surgery. The pseudoaneurysm demonstrated a progressive reduction in size and eventual complete involution at 6 months after surgery.

LESSONS

Limited literature reports extracranial-intracranial bypass-associated aneurysms treated primarily with either clipping or resection and reanastomosis. The authors demonstrate, for the first time, a progressively benign natural history course of an extracranial-intracranial bypass distal anastomotic site pseudoaneurysm.

Open access

Continuous direct intraarterial treatment of meningitis-induced vasospasm in a pediatric patient: illustrative case

Aubrey C Rogers, Aditya D Goyal, and Alexandra R Paul

BACKGROUND

Bacterial meningitis–induced ischemic stroke continues to cause significant long-term complications in pediatric patients. The authors present a case of severe right internal carotid artery terminus and M1 segment vasospasm in a 9-year-old with an infected cholesteatoma, which was refractory to multiple intraarterial treatments with verapamil and milrinone. This is the first report of continuous intraarterial antispasmodic treatment in a pediatric patient as well as the first report of continuous treatment in an awake and extubated patient.

OBSERVATIONS

Arterial narrowing was successfully treated by continuous direct intraarterial administration of both a calcium channel blocker (verapamil) and a phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitor (milrinone). The patient recovered remarkably well and was discharged home with no neurological deficit (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 0) and ambulatory without assistance after 22 days. The authors report a promising outcome of this technique performed in a pediatric patient.

LESSONS

This represents a novel treatment option for the prevention of stroke in pediatric bacterial meningitis. Continuous, direct intraarterial administration of antispasmodic medications can successfully prevent long-term neurological deficit in pediatric meningitis-associated vasospasm. The described method has the potential to significantly improve outcomes in severe pediatric meningitis-associated vasospasm.

Open access

Sternocleidomastoid muscle-splitting method for high cervical carotid endarterectomy: illustrative cases

Atsushi Sato, Tetsuo Sasaki, Toshihiro Ogiwara, Kazuhiro Hongo, and Tetsuyoshi Horiuchi

BACKGROUND

The number of cervical carotid endarterectomies (CEAs) has decreased as carotid artery stenting (CAS) has increased. However, CEA and CAS both have advantages and disadvantages; therefore, appropriate procedures must be selected for individual patients. High-positioned carotid artery stenosis presents technical challenges for CEA and is occasionally managed by performing CAS. However, CAS is associated with a high risk of thrombosis in patients with soft plaques, suggesting a clinical need for a better procedure. Consequently, appropriate surgical treatment for patients requiring high-level CEAs is essential.

OBSERVATIONS

In this study, a novel and straightforward method was devised. The primary concept underlying this technique is separation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) from other anatomical structures to ensure a wider surgical field. By anatomically separating the SCM into the sternal and clavicular head groups, the objective of the wider surgical field can be met. Herein, we report technical innovations in high-positioned carotid artery stenosis and evaluate their efficacy in two patients.

LESSONS

In conclusion, high CEA surgery using this new method is valuable and may eliminate barriers to more advanced approaches.

Open access

Disconnection of a jugular foramen dural arteriovenous fistula with cortical venous reflux via an intradural retrosigmoid approach: illustrative case

Richard Shaw, Johnny Wong, Hugo Andrade, and Ivan Radovanovic

BACKGROUND

Jugular foramen dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are rare and challenging lesions. Described methods of treatment include embolization and microsurgical disconnection through a far lateral transcondylar approach. The authors present the case of a Borden type III jugular foramen DAVF, which was treated with a novel, less invasive retrosigmoid approach with intradural skeletonization and packing of the sigmoid sinus.

OBSERVATIONS

The patient presented with headache and visual field deficit. Neuroimaging demonstrated a right temporal intracerebral hematoma with mass effect. This was due to a Borden type III jugular foramen DAVF with cortical venous reflux into the vein of Labbe secondary to recanalization of a previously thrombosed sigmoid sinus. Microsurgical disconnection was performed via a retrosigmoid approach, in which the sigmoid sinus was identified intradurally at the jugular foramen. The sigmoid sinus was isolated by drilling at the pre- and retrosigmoid spaces to permit packing and clip ligation. Postoperative angiography revealed complete occlusion of the DAVF.

LESSONS

Jugular foramen DAVFs are rare entities, which have been traditionally treated through a far lateral transcondylar approach. An intradural retrosigmoid approach is a safe, less invasive alternative, which involves less soft tissue and bony dissection and does not have the associated morbidity of craniocervical instability and hypoglossal neuropathy.

Open access

High-flow bypass for giant dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar aneurysms: illustrative cases

Richard Shaw, Alistair Kenneth Jukes, and Rodney Stewart Allan

BACKGROUND

Giant fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms are challenging lesions with a poor natural history. When there is progressive brainstem compression from these lesions, endovascular treatment can be insufficient, and bypass surgery remains a possible salvage option. High-flow bypass surgery with proximal occlusion can potentially arrest aneurysm growth, promote aneurysm thrombosis, and reduce rupture risk. The authors describe their experience in two patients with giant fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms treated with high-flow bypass.

OBSERVATIONS

Both patients presented with enlarging giant dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar aneurysms causing symptomatic brainstem compression. The authors performed staged treatment involving high-flow bypass from the external carotid artery to the posterior cerebral artery using a saphenous vein graft, Hunterian proximal vertebrobasilar occlusion, and finally posterior fossa decompression with or without direct aneurysm thrombectomy and debulking. Postoperative angiography revealed successful flow reversal, aneurysm exclusion, and no brainstem stroke. Clinically, one patient had improvement in their modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score from 3 preoperatively to 1 at 12-month follow-up. The second patient had a deterioration in their mRS score from 4 to 5 at 12-month follow-up.

LESSONS

High-flow bypass strategies remain high risk but can be a viable last resort in patients with neurological deficits and enlarging giant fusiform dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery aneurysms.

Open access

Surgically treated intracranial arteriovenous fistulas with hemorrhage, resulting in complete obliteration: illustrative cases

Ako Matsuhashi, Kei Yanai, Satoshi Koizumi, and Gakushi Yoshikawa

BACKGROUND

Intracranial arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a rare disease, defined as anastomoses between cerebral or meningeal arteries and dural venous sinuses or cortical veins. With the development of new agents and devices, endovascular embolization has been considered safe and effective in a majority of cases. However, cases that require direct surgery do exist. Herein, the authors present 3 cases of intracranial AVFs that presented with hemorrhage and were treated with direct surgery, achieving complete obliteration and favorable outcomes.

OBSERVATIONS

Intracranial AVFs that present with hemorrhage require immediate and complete obliteration. When AVFs involve the dural sinus, transvenous embolization is usually the first choice of treatment. AVFs with single cortical venous drainage are best treated with interruption of the draining vein close to the fistula. Transarterial embolization can be a curative treatment if there are no branches supplying cranial nerves or an association with pial feeders. In cases in which endovascular treatment is technically challenging or has resulted in incomplete occlusion, surgical treatment is indicated.

LESSONS

Despite the recent rise in endovascular treatment, it is important to recognize situations in which such treatment is not suitable for intracranial AVFs. Direct surgery is effective in such cases to offer the best possible outcome.

Open access

Intraoperative intraarterial indocyanine green video-angiography for disconnection of a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula: illustrative case

Youngkyung Jung, Antti Lindgren, Syed Uzair Ahmed, Ivan Radovanovic, Timo Krings, and Hugo Andrade-Barazarte

BACKGROUND

Intraarterial (IA) indocyanine green (ICG) angiography is an intraoperative imaging technique offering special and temporal characterization of vascular lesions with very fast dye clearance. The authors’ aim is to demonstrate the use of IA ICG angiography to aid in the surgical treatment of a perimedullary thoracic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in a hybrid operating room (OR).

OBSERVATIONS

A 31-year-old woman with a known history of spinal AVF presented with 6 weeks of lower-extremity weakness, gait imbalance, and bowel/bladder dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extensive series of flow voids across the thoracic spine, most notably at T11–12. After partial embolization, she was taken for surgical disconnection in a hybrid OR. Intraoperative spinal digital subtraction angiography was performed to identify feeding vessels. When the target arteries were catheterized, 0.05 mg of ICG in 2 mL of saline was injected, and the ICG flow in each artery was recorded using the microscope. With an improved surgical understanding of the contributing feeding arteries, the authors achieved complete in situ disconnection of the AVF.

LESSONS

IA ICG angiography can be used in hybrid OR settings to illustrate the vascular anatomy of multifeeder perimedullary AVFs and confirm its postoperative disconnection with a fast dye clearance.

Open access

Aneurysm appearing at the anastomosis site 11 years after superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery bypass surgery: moyamoya disease with a rapidly growing aneurysm. Illustrative case

Hiroki Eguchi, Koji Arai, and Takakazu Kawamata

BACKGROUND

Superficial temporal artery–middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass surgery is performed to prevent ischemia and hemorrhage in patients with moyamoya disease. Only a few reports have described aneurysms appearing around the anastomosis site after bypass surgery, and the underlying mechanism remains unknown.

OBSERVATIONS

The present case involved a 62-year-old woman who underwent STA-MCA bypass surgery for ischemic quasi-moyamoya disease at 46 years of age. Postoperatively, she underwent annual magnetic resonance imaging examinations. At 11 years after STA-MCA bypass surgery, a 3-mm aneurysm appeared at the anastomosis site. Four years later, headache developed and the aneurysm had grown to 5 mm. Craniotomy clipping was performed to prevent rupture. The patient was discharged home 2 weeks after surgery without any apparent complications.

LESSONS

Long-term observation is crucial after direct bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. Measures to prevent rupture should be considered for cases involving aneurysm complications.