Browse

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Spinal Cord Injury x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Management of a recurrent spinal arachnoid cyst presenting as arachnoiditis in the setting of spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: illustrative case

Omar Hussain, Randall Treffy, Hope M Reecher, Andrew L DeGroot, Peter Palmer, Mohamad Bakhaidar, and Saman Shabani

BACKGROUND

Spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a rare pathological entity with a variety of presentations depending on the underlying etiology, which often remains cryptogenic. The literature is sparse regarding the most efficacious treatment or management option, and there is no consensus on follow-up time or modalities. Additionally, there are very few reports that include operative videos, which is provided herein.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of spontaneous spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage without an underlying etiology in a patient with progressive myelopathy, back pain, and lower-extremity paresthesias. She presented to our institution, and because of progressive worsening of her symptoms and the development of compressive arachnoid cysts, she underwent thoracic laminectomies for evacuation of subdural fluid, fenestration of the arachnoid cysts, and lysis of significant arachnoid adhesions. Her clinical course was further complicated by the recurrence of worsening myelopathy and the development of a large compressive arachnoid cyst with further arachnoiditis. The patient underwent repeat surgical intervention for cyst decompression with an improvement in symptoms.

LESSONS

This case highlights the importance of long-term follow-up for these complicated cases with an emphasis on repeat magnetic resonance imaging. Unfortunately, surgical intervention is associated with short-term relief of the symptoms and no significant nonoperative management is available for these patients.

Open access

Successful management of delayed traumatic cervical spondyloptosis with neurological deficit: illustrative case

Ibrahim Dao, Salifou Napon, Ousmane Ouattara, Abdoulaye Sanou, Elie Nassoum, Sylvain Delwendé Zabsonré, and Abel Kabré

BACKGROUND

Cervical spondyloptosis is a serious condition scarcely encountered by spine surgeons. Few cases have been reported in the literature. There are no general guidelines for their management, especially in delayed cases. The authors describe their surgical technique for the management of cervical spondyloptosis 45 days after the trauma.

OBSERVATIONS

A 28-year-old patient was admitted 45 days after head and cervical trauma leading to quadriplegia with muscular strength at the C5 level. Cervical computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed C6–7 spondyloptosis with complete slippage of the C6 vertebral body in front of C7. Posterior and anterior cervical spine approaches during the same surgery allowed decompression and stabilization, leading to a dramatic improvement in the neurological deficit. The patient was able to walk 18 months later with near normal balance.

LESSONS

Traumatic cervical spondyloptosis requires early management to increase the possibility of decompression through anatomical realignment and stabilization. In delayed cases, a combined anterior and posterior cervical spine approach according to our technique allows decompression and stabilization with a good postoperative outcome possible.

Open access

Combined endoscopic and microsurgical approach for the drainage of a multisegmental thoracolumbar epidural abscess: illustrative case

Vincent Hagel, Felix Dymel, Stephan Werle, Vera Barrera, and Mazda Farshad

BACKGROUND

Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but serious infectious disease that can rapidly develop into a life-threatening condition. Therefore, the appropriate treatment is indispensable. Although conservative treatment is justifiable in certain cases, surgical treatment needs to be considered as an alternative early on because of complications such as (progressive) neurological deficits or sepsis. However, traditional surgical techniques usually include destructive approaches up to (multilevel) laminectomies. Such excessive approaches do have biomechanical effects potentially affecting the long-term outcomes. Therefore, minimally invasive approaches have been described as alternative strategies, including endoscopic approaches.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors describe a surgical technique involving a combination of two minimally invasive approaches (endoscopic and microsurgical) to drain a multisegmental (thoracolumbar) abscess using the physical phenomenon of continuous pressure difference to minimize collateral tissue damage.

LESSONS

The combination of minimally invasive approaches, including the endoscopic technique, may be an alternative in draining selected epidural abscesses while achieving a similar amount of abscess removal and causing less collateral approach damage in comparison with more traditional techniques.

Open access

Pedicle subtraction metallectomy with complex posterior reconstruction for fixed cervicothoracic kyphosis: illustrative case

Harman Chopra, José Manuel Orenday-Barraza, Alexander E. Braley, Alfredo Guiroy, Olivia E. Gilbert, and Michael A. Galgano

BACKGROUND

Iatrogenic cervical deformity is a devastating complication that can result from a well-intended operation but a poor understanding of the individual biomechanics of a patient’s spine. Patient factors, such as bone fragility, high T1 slope, and undiagnosed myopathies often play a role in perpetuating a deformity despite an otherwise successful surgery. This imbalance can lead to significant morbidity and a decreased quality of life.

OBSERVATIONS

A 55-year-old male presented to the authors’ clinic with a chin-to-chest deformity and cervical myelopathy. He previously had an anterior C2–T2 fixation and a posterior C1–T6 instrumented fusion. He subsequently developed screw pullout at multiple levels, so the original surgeon removed all of the posterior hardware. The T1 cage (original corpectomy) severely subsided into the body of T2, generating an angular kyphosis that eventually developed a rigid osseous circumferential union at the cervicothoracic junction with severe cord compression. An anterior approach was not feasible; therefore, a 3-column osteotomy/fusion in the upper thoracic spine was planned whereby 1 of the T2 screws would need to be removed from a posterior approach for the reduction to take place.

LESSONS

This case highlights the devastating effect of a hardware complication leading to a fixed cervical spine deformity and the complex decision making involved to safely correct the challenging deformity and restore function.

Open access

Paraparesis caused by intradural thoracic spinal granuloma secondary to organizing hematoma: illustrative case

John K. Yue, Young M. Lee, Daniel Quintana, Alexander A. Aabedi, Nishanth Krishnan, Thomas A. Wozny, John P. Andrews, and Michael C. Huang

BACKGROUND

Spinal granulomas form from infectious or noninfectious inflammatory processes and are rarely present intradurally. Intradural granulomas secondary to hematoma are unreported in the literature and present diagnostic and management challenges.

OBSERVATIONS

A 70-year-old man receiving aspirin presented with encephalopathy, subacute malaise, and right lower extremity weakness and was diagnosed with polysubstance withdrawal and refractory hypertension requiring extended treatment. Seven days after admission, he reported increased bilateral lower extremity (BLE) weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2–3 and T7–8 masses abutting the pia, with spinal cord compression at T2–3. He was transferred to the authors’ institution, and work-up showed no vascular shunting or malignancy. He underwent T2–3 laminectomies for biopsy/resection. A firm, xanthochromic mass was resected en bloc. Pathology showed organizing hematoma without infection, vascular malformation, or malignancy. Subsequent coagulopathy work-up was unremarkable. His BLE strength significantly improved, and he declined resection of the inferior mass. He completed physical therapy and was cleared for placement in a skilled nursing facility.

LESSONS

Spinal granulomas can mimic vascular lesions and malignancy. The authors present the first report of paraparesis caused by intradural granuloma secondary to organizing hematoma, preceded by severe refractory hypertension. Tissue diagnosis is critical, and resection is curative. These findings can inform the vigilant clinician for expeditious treatment.

Open access

Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula with perimedullary venous drainage–associated cervical myelopathy: illustrative case

Sergi Cobos Codina, Luis Miguel Bernal García, José Antonio Rodríguez Sánchez, Tania Gavilán Iglesias, and Luis Fernández de Alarcón

BACKGROUND

Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) with perimedullary venous drainage causing cervical myelopathy are very uncommon conditions with an extremely aggressive behavior. When the characteristic radiological clues are missing, the unspecific clinical picture may cause delay and make the diagnosis challenging.

OBSERVATIONS

Here the authors report a case of a 58-year-old man who developed progressive spastic tetraparesis and dyspnea with an extensive mild enhancing cervical cord lesion initially oriented as a neurosyphilis-associated transverse myelitis. Acute worsening after steroid administration redirected the diagnosis, and a tentorial Cognard type V DAVF was elicited. The microsurgical disconnection process is described, and previously documented cases in the literature are reviewed.

LESSONS

If a DAVF is highly suspected, it is important to consider the possibility of its intracranial origin, and spinal as well as cerebral arteriography must be performed.