Browse

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Surgical Technique x
  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Case Lessons x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Focal drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy associated with an ipsilateral anterior choroidal artery aneurysm: illustrative case

H. Westley Phillips, Shivani D. Rangwala, Joanna Papadakis, David J. Segar, Melissa Tsuboyama, Anna L. R. Pinto, Joseph P. Harmon, Sulpicio G. Soriano, Carlos J. Munoz, Joseph R. Madsen, Alfred P. See, and Scellig S. Stone

BACKGROUND

The occurrence of both an intracranial aneurysm and epilepsy, especially drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE), is rare. Although the overall incidence of aneurysms associated with DRE is unclear, it is thought to be particularly infrequent in the pediatric population. Surgical ligation of the offending aneurysm has been reported in conjunction with resolving seizure activity, although few cases have cited a combined approach of aneurysm ligation and resection of an epileptogenic focus.

OBSERVATIONS

We present the case of a 14-year-old female patient with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and an ipsilateral supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. Seizure semiology, electroencephalography monitoring, and magnetic resonance imaging all indicated a left temporal epileptogenic focus, in addition to an incidental aneurysm. The authors recommended a combined surgery involving resection of the temporal lesion and surgical clip ligation of the aneurysm. Near-total resection and successful ligation were achieved, and the patient has remained seizure free since surgery at 1 year postoperatively.

LESSONS

In patients with focal DRE and an adjacent intracranial aneurysm, a combined surgical approach involving both resection and surgical ligation can be used. Several surgical timing and neuroanesthetic considerations should be made to ensure the overall safety and efficacy of this procedure.

Open access

The utility of diffusion tractography for speech preservation in laser ablation of the dominant insula: illustrative case

Timothy J. Kaufmann, Vance T. Lehman, Lily C. Wong-Kisiel, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, and Kai J. Miller

BACKGROUND

Open surgical treatment of insular epilepsy holds particular risk of injury to middle cerebral artery branches, the operculum (through retraction), and adjacent language-related white matter tracts in the language-dominant hemisphere. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a surgical alternative that allows precise lesioning with potentially less operative risk. The authors presented the case of a 13-year-old girl with intractable, MRI-negative, left (dominant hemisphere) insular epilepsy that was treated with LITT. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography was used to aid full posterior insular lesioning in the region of stereo electroencephalography–determined seizure onset while avoiding thermal injury to the language-related superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF)/arcuate fasciculus (AF) and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF).

OBSERVATIONS

DTI tractography was used successfully in planning insular LITT and facilitated a robust insular ablation with sharp margins at the interfaces with the SLF/AF and IFOF. These tracts were spared, and no neurological deficits were induced through LITT.

LESSONS

Although it is technically demanding and has important limitations that must be understood, clinically available DTI tractography adds precision and confidence to insular laser ablation when used to protect important language-related white matter tracts.