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Open access

Introducing next-generation transcranial surgery with the head-mounted 3D View Vision display in extracorporeal microsurgery: illustrative cases

Young Ju Kim, Hidehito Kimura, Hiroto Kajimoto, Tatsuya Mori, Masahiro Maeyama, Kazuhiro Tanaka, and Takashi Sasayama

BACKGROUND

Exoscopy in neurosurgery offers various advantages, including increased freedom of the viewing axis while the surgeon maintains a comfortable upright position. However, the optimal monitor positioning to avoid interference with surgical manipulation remains unresolved. Herein, the authors describe two cases in which a three-dimensional head-mounted display (3D-HMD) was introduced into a transcranial neurosurgical procedure using an exoscope.

OBSERVATIONS

Case 1 was a 50-year-old man who presented with recurrent epistaxis and was diagnosed with an olfactory neuroblastoma that extended from the nasal cavity to the anterior cranial base and infiltrated the right anterior cranial fossa. Case 2 was a 65-year-old man who presented with epistaxis and was diagnosed with a left-sided olfactory neuroblastoma. In both cases, en bloc tumor resection was successfully performed via a simultaneous exoscopic transcranial approach using a 3D-HMD and an endoscopic endonasal approach, eliminating the need to watch a large monitor beside the patient.

LESSONS

This is the first report of using a 3D-HMD in transcranial surgery. The 3D-HMD effectively addressed issues with the field of vision and concentration while preserving the effectiveness of traditional microscopic and exoscopic procedures when observed on a 3D monitor. Combining the 3D-HMD with an exoscope holds the potential to become a next-generation surgical approach.

Open access

Clival intraosseous myxoma treated with an endoscopic endonasal approach: illustrative case

Mokshal H. Porwal, Daniel M. Aaronson, Abrahim N. Razzak, and Nathan T. Zwagerman

BACKGROUND

Solitary lesions of the clivus, especially nonchordomatous ones, are exceptionally rare pathologies representing only 0.1%–0.2% of intracranial tumors that may present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Intraosseous myxomas are benign tumors arising from mesenchymal cells with an unknown pathophysiology.

OBSERVATIONS

In this article, a 15-year-old male with clival intraosseous myxoma who was treated via an endoscopic endonasal surgical approach is presented. The patient became symptomatic after a baseball struck his head, leading to throbbing headaches and visual difficulties for tracking objects. Examination noted diplopia, cranial nerve VI palsy, and ptosis. After imaging revealed a tumor extending to the left cavernous sinus with bulging of the dorsal clivus against the basilar artery/ventral pons, resection was performed. Postoperatively, the patient noted ocular motility and alignment improvement without further complications.

LESSONS

Clival masses present with symptoms from compromised neurovascular structures including visual disturbances and trigeminal sensory deficits. Given the rarity of these entities, patients may postpone further treatment until workup; this patient was misdiagnosed for possible concussion until several weeks passed. A PubMed database review of cranial myxoma cases was conducted to identify solitary clival intraosseous myxoma cases. This case is one of the few in which this pathology was treated through an endoscopic endonasal operative approach without complications, demonstrating its safety and effectiveness.

Open access

Intraosseous meningioma, a rare presentation of a common brain tumor: illustrative case

Sherif Elwatidy, Abdulaziz Alanazi, Rahaf F. Alanazi, and Khulood K. Alraddadi

BACKGROUND

The subset of extradural meningiomas arising from bone is called primary intraosseous meningioma. The present article outlines the clinical presentation, investigation, surgical management, and clinical outcomes of a challenging case of intraosseous meningioma.

OBSERVATIONS

A 27-year-old male presented with new-onset seizure of 3 years’ duration and growing painless hard swelling involving the left frontoparietal bone, the medial aspect of the left orbit, the nasal bone, and the temporal bone. Brain computed tomography showed a diffuse intradiploic space osseous lesion with a ground-glass appearance. The patient underwent bifrontal craniotomy and tumor excision. The histopathological sections showed the presence of classic whorls of meningothelial cells around reactive bony tissue suggestive of intraosseous meningioma. Postoperatively, the patient was neurologically intact, and he was discharged in a stable condition. The outcome of this case was satisfactory.

LESSONS

The treatment of primary intraosseous meningioma is wide surgical excision together with the involved dura and any intradural tumor. The location of the tumor determines the approach and the amount of resection, keeping in mind preservation of function. The use of adjuvant therapy is reserved for cases of tumor recurrence or an atypical type.