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Open access

Cervicothoracic ventral-dorsal rhizotomy for bilateral upper-extremity hypertonia in cerebral palsy: illustrative case

Ryan Kelly, Hanna R Kemeny, Sunny Abdelmageed, Robin Trierweiler, Tim Krater, Melissa A LoPresti, and Jeffrey S Raskin

BACKGROUND

Management of medically refractory limb-specific hypertonia is challenging. Neurosurgical options include deep brain stimulation, intrathecal baclofen, thalamotomy, pallidotomy, or rhizotomy. Cervical dorsal rhizotomy has been successful in the treatment of upper-extremity spasticity. Cervical ventral and cervical ventral-dorsal rhizotomy (VDR) has been used in the treatment or torticollis and traumatic hypertonia; however, the use of cervicothoracic VDR for the treatment of upper-extremity mixed hypertonia is not well described.

OBSERVATIONS

A 9-year-old girl with severe quadriplegic mixed hypertonia secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) underwent cervicothoracic VDR. Modified Ashworth Scale scores, provision of caregiving, and examination improved. Treatment was well tolerated.

LESSONS

Cervicothoracic VDR can afford symptomatic and quality of life improvement in patients with medically refractory limb hypertonia. Intraoperative positioning and nuances in surgical techniques are particularly important based on spinal cord position as modified by scoliosis. Here, the first successful use of cervicothoracic VDR for the treatment of medically refractory upper-limb hypertonia in a pediatric patient with CP is described.

Open access

Multiple three-column osteotomies successfully correcting cervicothoracic kyphosis in the setting of ankylosing spondylitis: illustrative case

Luke Mugge, Paul Gorka, Cristie Brewer, and Brian McHugh

BACKGROUND

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an autoimmune spondylarthritis often associated with rigid kyphoscoliosis. The authors describe a surgical approach that employs multilevel three-column osteotomies for the restoration of normal global alignment.

OBSERVATIONS

A 48-year-old male with a past medical history of AS presented to the clinic with a stooped-over posture: his chin-brow vertical angle (CBVA) was 58.0°; T1 slope (T1S), 97.8°; thoracic kyphosis (TK; T1–12), 94.2°; proximal TK (T1–5), 50.8°; distal TK (T5–12), 43.5°; and sagittal vertical axis (SVA), 22.6 cm. A two-stage procedure was planned. During stage 1, instrumentation was placed from C5 to T10, followed by a T3 vertebral column resection. During stage 2, bilateral pedicle screws were placed from T11 to the pelvis. An L3 pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) was completed and was followed by a T7 PSO. Postoperatively, the patient had significant postural improvement: CBVA was 29.3°; T1S, 57.8°; TK, 77.3°; proximal TK, 33.5°; distal TK, 43.8°; and SVA, 15 cm. At 6 years postoperatively, the patient continued to do well and was without evidence of construct breakdown.

LESSONS

The authors propose that multilevel three-column osteotomies, if optimally located, successfully correct spinal malalignment associated with AS.

Open access

Treatment of an anterior cervicothoracic myelomeningocele together with spine deformity correction in a child: illustrative case

Hudin N Jackson, Nealen Laxpati, and David F Bauer

BACKGROUND

Anterior cervicothoracic myelomeningoceles are a rare pathology. In reported cases, treatment has included shunting, isolated resection and repair without deformity correction, or isolated deformity correction without meningocele repair. The authors describe a pediatric patient with an anterior cervicothoracic myelomeningocele presenting with progressive neurological decline, who underwent simultaneous treatment of the myelomeningocele to detether the spinal cord and achieve major correction of the scoliotic deformity.

OBSERVATIONS

A 15-year-old girl was born with C7-T1-T2 hemivertebrae and anterior cervical myelomeningocele at C7–T1. She developed progressive cervical thoracic scoliosis, left hemiparesis initially, and additional right hemiparesis eventually. She underwent surgical repair via C7, T1, and T2 corpectomies with intradural detethering of the spinal cord. The scoliosis was treated with C7–T2 Ponte osteotomies and C2–T5 posterior fixation, followed by anterior reconstruction with a titanium cage and anterior plate from C6 to T3. The myelomeningocele was adequately treated with good correction of the patient’s deformity. The patient had postoperative improvement in her strength and solid arthrodesis on postoperative imaging.

LESSONS

The authors describe the successful treatment of an anterior cervicothoracic myelomeningocele and associated scoliosis in a child. This is a unique report of a combined strategy to achieve both deformity correction and detethering of the spinal cord.

Open access

Significance of upper cervical epidural venous engorgement on head computed tomography in the initial diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension: patient series

Toshihide Takahashi, Kiyoyuki Yanaka, Hitoshi Aiyama, Minami Saura, Michihide Kajita, Nobuyuki Takahashi, Kuniyuki Onuma, and Eiichi Ishikawa

BACKGROUND

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a rare condition characterized by positional headache, for which contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred diagnostic method. Although MRI reveals characteristic findings, head computed tomography (CT) is usually the first diagnostic step, but identifying features of SIH on CT is often difficult. This study was specifically designed to evaluate the utility of head CT in detecting upper cervical epidural venous engorgement as a sign of SIH.

OBSERVATIONS

Of 24 patients with SIH diagnosed between March 2011 and May 2023, 10 did not undergo upper cervical CT. In the remaining 14 patients, engorgement of the upper cervical epidural venous plexus was observed. CT detection rates were consistent with MRI for spinal fluid accumulation or dural thickening. After treatment, in 92.9% of patients, the thickness of the epidural venous plexus decreased statistically significantly from 4.8 ± 1.3 mm to 3.6 ± 1.2 mm.

LESSONS

This study suggests that upper cervical spine CT focused on epidural venous engorgement may be helpful in the initial diagnosis of SIH and may complement conventional MRI evaluation. Extending CT imaging to the upper cervical spine will improve the diagnostic accuracy of patients with positional headaches suspected to be SIH.

Open access

Minimally invasive resection of a prominent transverse process in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: new application for a primarily spinal approach. Illustrative case

Marc Hohenhaus, Johann Lambeck, Nico Kremers, Jürgen Beck, Christoph Scholz, and Ulrich Hubbe

BACKGROUND

The optimal surgical approach to treat neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) depends on the individual patient’s anatomy as well as the surgeon’s experience. The authors present a minimally invasive posterior approach for the resection of a prominent transverse process to reduce local muscular trauma.

OBSERVATIONS

A 19-year-old female presented with painful sensations in the right arm and severe fine-motor skill dysfunction in the right hand, each of which had been present for several years. Further examination confirmed affected C8 and T1 areas, and imaging showed an elongated C7 transverse process displacing the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. Decompression of the plexus structures by resection of the C7 transverse process was indicated, owing to persistent neurological effects. Surgery was performed using a minimally invasive posterior approach in which the nuchal soft tissue was bluntly dissected by dilatators and resection of the transverse process was done microscopically through a tubular retractor. The postoperative course showed a sufficient reduction of pain and paresthesia.

LESSONS

The authors describe a minimally invasive posterior approach for the treatment of nTOS with the aim of providing indirect relief of strain on brachial plexus structures. The advantages of this technique include a small skin incision and minor soft tissue damage.

Open access

Sternocleidomastoid muscle-splitting method for high cervical carotid endarterectomy: illustrative cases

Atsushi Sato, Tetsuo Sasaki, Toshihiro Ogiwara, Kazuhiro Hongo, and Tetsuyoshi Horiuchi

BACKGROUND

The number of cervical carotid endarterectomies (CEAs) has decreased as carotid artery stenting (CAS) has increased. However, CEA and CAS both have advantages and disadvantages; therefore, appropriate procedures must be selected for individual patients. High-positioned carotid artery stenosis presents technical challenges for CEA and is occasionally managed by performing CAS. However, CAS is associated with a high risk of thrombosis in patients with soft plaques, suggesting a clinical need for a better procedure. Consequently, appropriate surgical treatment for patients requiring high-level CEAs is essential.

OBSERVATIONS

In this study, a novel and straightforward method was devised. The primary concept underlying this technique is separation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) from other anatomical structures to ensure a wider surgical field. By anatomically separating the SCM into the sternal and clavicular head groups, the objective of the wider surgical field can be met. Herein, we report technical innovations in high-positioned carotid artery stenosis and evaluate their efficacy in two patients.

LESSONS

In conclusion, high CEA surgery using this new method is valuable and may eliminate barriers to more advanced approaches.

Open access

Successful management of delayed traumatic cervical spondyloptosis with neurological deficit: illustrative case

Ibrahim Dao, Salifou Napon, Ousmane Ouattara, Abdoulaye Sanou, Elie Nassoum, Sylvain Delwendé Zabsonré, and Abel Kabré

BACKGROUND

Cervical spondyloptosis is a serious condition scarcely encountered by spine surgeons. Few cases have been reported in the literature. There are no general guidelines for their management, especially in delayed cases. The authors describe their surgical technique for the management of cervical spondyloptosis 45 days after the trauma.

OBSERVATIONS

A 28-year-old patient was admitted 45 days after head and cervical trauma leading to quadriplegia with muscular strength at the C5 level. Cervical computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging revealed C6–7 spondyloptosis with complete slippage of the C6 vertebral body in front of C7. Posterior and anterior cervical spine approaches during the same surgery allowed decompression and stabilization, leading to a dramatic improvement in the neurological deficit. The patient was able to walk 18 months later with near normal balance.

LESSONS

Traumatic cervical spondyloptosis requires early management to increase the possibility of decompression through anatomical realignment and stabilization. In delayed cases, a combined anterior and posterior cervical spine approach according to our technique allows decompression and stabilization with a good postoperative outcome possible.

Open access

Cranial vault suspension for basilar invagination in patients with open cranial sutures: technique and long-term follow-up. Illustrative case

Christopher B Cutler, Daphne Li, and John R Ruge

BACKGROUND

Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by severe osteoporosis, scoliosis, and persistent open cranial sutures (POCSs). Neurological complications include hydrocephalus, Chiari I malformations, and basilar invagination (BI). Surgical intervention in HCS is challenging due to severe osteoporosis, ligamentous laxity, POCSs, and extreme skeletal deformities. Herein, the authors present a case of BI repair in a patient with HCS and POCSs, requiring a novel technique of cranial vault suspension, with long-term follow-up.

OBSERVATIONS

A 20-year-old female with HCS and progressive symptomatic BI, initially managed with posterior fossa decompression and occipital to cervical fusion, subsequently required cranial vault expansion due to symptomatic shifting of her cranium secondary to POCS. This custom construct provided long-term stabilization and neurological improvement over a follow-up duration of 9.5 years. A literature review performed revealed three other cases of surgical intervention for BI in patients with HCS and clinicopathological characteristics of each case was compared to the present illustrative case.

LESSONS

POCSs in patients with BI complicate traditional surgical approaches, necessitating more invasive techniques to secure all mobile cranial parts for optimal outcomes. Using this cranial vault suspension and fusion technique results in lasting neurological improvement and construct stability.

Open access

Management of rare atlantoaxial synovial cyst case with extension to the cerebellopontine angle: illustrative case

Shawn D’Souza, Vikram Seshadri, Harsh P Shah, Jan T Hachmann, and R. Scott Graham

BACKGROUND

Synovial cysts are a common finding in degenerative spine disease, most frequently involving the facet joints of the lumbar spine. Synovial cysts are less common in the cervical spine and rarely involve the atlantoaxial junction.

OBSERVATIONS

In this case report, the authors detail a unique presentation of a left atlantoaxial synovial cyst with large intracranial extension into the cerebellopontine angle causing progressive cranial nerve palsies resulting in tinnitus, vertigo, diminished hearing, gait imbalance, left trigeminal hypesthesia, left facial weakness, and dysarthria. The patient underwent a retromastoid craniectomy for resection of the synovial cyst, resulting in improvement and resolution of symptoms. Follow-up occurred at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 5 months postoperatively without recurrence on imaging.

LESSONS

The authors describe acute and long-term management of a unique presentation of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst including retromastoid craniectomy, intervals for follow-up for recurrence, and possible treatment options in cases of recurrence. A systematic literature review was also performed to explore all reported cases of craniocervical junction synovial cysts and subsequent surgical management.

Open access

Surgical management of metastatic Hürthle cell carcinoma to the skull base, cortex, and spine: illustrative case

N. U. Farrukh Hameed, Meagan M Hoppe, Ahmed Habib, Jeffrey Head, Regan Shanahan, Bradley A Gross, Sandra Narayanan, Georgios Zenonos, and Pascal Zinn

BACKGROUND

Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCC) is an unusual and aggressive variant of the follicular type of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), accounting for less than 3% of DTCs but posing the highest risk of metastasis. Brain metastases are uncommonly reported in the literature but pose a poor prognosis. The low rate of brain metastases from HCC coupled with ambiguous treatment protocols for the extracranial disease complicate successful disease management and definitive treatment strategy. The authors present the case of a patient with HCC metastasis to the skull base, cortex, and spine with recent tibial metastasis.

OBSERVATIONS

Despite the presence of metastasis to the cortex, skull base, and spine, the patient responded very well to radiation therapy, sellar mass resection, and cervical spine decompression and fixation and has made a remarkable recovery.

LESSONS

The authors’ multidisciplinary approach to the patient’s care, including a diverse team of specialists from oncology, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, radiology, endocrinology, and collaboration with clinical trial researchers, was fundamental to her successful outcome, demonstrating the utility of intersecting specialties in successful outcomes in neuro-oncological patient care.