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Era D. Mikkonen, Markus B. Skrifvars, Matti Reinikainen, Stepani Bendel, Ruut Laitio, Sanna Hoppu, Tero Ala-Kokko, Atte Karppinen and Rahul Raj

OBJECTIVE

There are few specific prognostic models specifically developed for the pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) population. In the present study, the authors tested the predictive performance of existing prognostic tools, originally developed for the adult TBI population, in pediatric TBI patients requiring stays in the ICU.

METHODS

The authors used the Finnish Intensive Care Consortium database to identify pediatric patients (< 18 years of age) treated in 4 academic ICUs in Finland between 2003 and 2013. They tested the predictive performance of 4 classification systems—the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials (IMPACT) TBI model, the Helsinki CT score, the Rotterdam CT score, and the Marshall CT classification—by assessing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the explanatory variation (pseudo-R2 statistic). The primary outcome was 6-month functional outcome (favorable outcome defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 3–5).

RESULTS

Overall, 341 patients (median age 14 years) were included; of these, 291 patients had primary head CT scans available. The IMPACT core-based model showed an AUC of 0.85 (95% CI 0.78–0.91) and a pseudo-R2 value of 0.40. Of the CT scoring systems, the Helsinki CT score displayed the highest performance (AUC 0.84, 95% CI 0.78–0.90; pseudo-R2 0.39) followed by the Rotterdam CT score (AUC 0.80, 95% CI 0.73–0.86; pseudo-R2 0.34).

CONCLUSIONS

Prognostic tools originally developed for the adult TBI population seemed to perform well in pediatric TBI. Of the tested CT scoring systems, the Helsinki CT score yielded the highest predictive value.

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Brian Appavu, Stephen T. Foldes and P. David Adelson

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children both in the United States and throughout the world. Despite valiant efforts and multiple clinical trials completed over the last few decades, there are no high-level recommendations for pediatric TBI available in current guidelines. In this review, the authors explore key findings from the major pediatric clinical trials in children with TBI that have shaped present-day recommendations and the insights gained from them. The authors also offer a perspective on potential efforts to improve the efficacy of future clinical trials in children following TBI.

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Current and novel practice of stereotactic radiosurgery

JNSPG 75th Anniversary Invited Review Article

Douglas Kondziolka

Stereotactic radiosurgery emerged as a neurosurgical discipline in order to utilize energy for the manipulation of brain or nerve tissue, with the goal of minimal access and safe and effective care of a spectrum of neurosurgical disorders. Perhaps no other branch of neurosurgery has been so disruptive across the entire discipline of brain tumor care, treatment of vascular disorders, and management of functional problems. Radiosurgery is mainstream, supported by thousands of peer-reviewed outcomes reports. This article reviews current practice with a focus on challenges, emerging trends, and areas of investigation.

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Abhinav K. Reddy, James S. Ryoo, Steven Denyer, Laura S. McGuire and Ankit I. Mehta

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to illustrate the demographic characteristics of meningioma patients and observe the effect of adjuvant radiation therapy on survival by using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. More specifically, the authors aimed to answer the question of whether adjuvant radiotherapy following resection of atypical meningioma confers a cause-specific survival benefit. Additionally, they attempted to add to previous characterizations of the epidemiology of primary meningiomas and assess the effectiveness of the standard of care for benign and anaplastic meningiomas. They also sought to characterize the efficacy of various treatment options in atypical and anaplastic meningiomas separately since nearly all other analyses have grouped these two together despite varying treatment regimens for these behavior categories.

METHODS

SEER data from 1973 to 2015 were queried using appropriate ICD-O-3 codes for benign, atypical, and anaplastic meningiomas. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment choices were analyzed. The effects of treatment were examined using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.

RESULTS

A total of 57,998 patients were included in the analysis of demographic, meningioma, and treatment characteristics. Among this population, cases of unspecified WHO tumor grade were excluded in the multivariate analysis, leaving a total of 12,931 patients to examine outcomes among treatment paradigms. In benign meningiomas, gross-total resection (HR 0.289, p = 0.013) imparted a significant cause-specific survival benefit over no treatment. In anaplastic meningioma cases, adjuvant radiotherapy imparted a significant survival benefit following both subtotal (HR 0.089, p = 0.018) and gross-total (HR 0.162, p = 0.002) resection as compared to gross-total resection alone. In atypical tumors, gross-total resection plus radiotherapy did not significantly change the hazard risk (HR 1.353, p = 0.628) compared to gross-total resection alone. Similarly, it was found that adjuvant radiation did not significantly benefit survival after a subtotal resection (HR 1.440, p = 0.644).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study demonstrate that the role of adjuvant radiotherapy, especially after the resection of atypical meningioma, remains somewhat unclear. Thus, given these results, prospective randomized clinical studies are warranted to provide clear information on the effects of adjuvant radiation in meningioma treatment.

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Swathi Chidambaram, Susan C. Pannullo, Michelle Roytman, David J. Pisapia, Benjamin Liechty, Rajiv S. Magge, Rohan Ramakrishna, Philip E. Stieg, Theodore H. Schwartz and Jana Ivanidze

OBJECTIVE

There is a need for advanced imaging biomarkers to improve radiation treatment planning and response assessment. T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI (DCE MRI) allows quantitative assessment of tissue perfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction and has entered clinical practice in the management of primary and secondary brain neoplasms. The authors sought to retrospectively investigate DCE MRI parameters in meningiomas treated with resection and adjuvant radiation therapy using volumetric segmentation.

METHODS

A retrospective review of more than 300 patients with meningiomas resected between January 2015 and December 2018 identified 14 eligible patients with 18 meningiomas who underwent resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients were excluded if they did not undergo adjuvant radiation therapy or DCE MRI. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained and compared to DCE perfusion metrics, including mean plasma volume (v p), extracellular volume (v e), volume transfer constant (K trans), rate constant (k ep), and wash-in rate of contrast into the tissue, which were derived from volumetric analysis of the enhancing volumes of interest.

RESULTS

The mean patient age was 64 years (range 49–86 years), and 50% of patients (7/14) were female. The average tumor volume was 8.07 cm3 (range 0.21–27.89 cm3). The median Ki-67 in the cohort was 15%. When stratified by median Ki-67, patients with Ki-67 greater than 15% had lower median v p (0.02 vs 0.10, p = 0.002), and lower median wash-in rate (1.27 vs 4.08 sec−1, p = 0.04) than patients with Ki-67 of 15% or below. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant, moderate positive correlation between v e and time to progression (r = 0.49, p < 0.05). Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between K trans and time to progression, which approached, but did not reach, statistical significance (r = 0.48, p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates a potential role for DCE MRI in the preoperative characterization and stratification of meningiomas, laying the foundation for future prospective studies incorporating DCE as a biomarker in meningioma diagnosis and treatment planning.

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Adela Wu, Michael C. Jin, Antonio Meola, Hong-nei Wong and Steven D. Chang

OBJECTIVE

Adjuvant radiotherapy has become a common addition to the management of high-grade meningiomas, as immediate treatment with radiation following resection has been associated with significantly improved outcomes. Recent investigations into particle therapy have expanded into the management of high-risk meningiomas. Here, the authors systematically review studies on the efficacy and utility of particle-based radiotherapy in the management of high-grade meningioma.

METHODS

A literature search was developed by first defining the population, intervention, comparison, outcomes, and study design (PICOS). A search strategy was designed for each of three electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, and Scopus. Data extraction was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Outcomes of interest included local disease control, overall survival, and toxicity, which were compared with historical data on photon-based therapies.

RESULTS

Eleven retrospective studies including 240 patients with atypical (WHO grade II) and anaplastic (WHO grade III) meningioma undergoing particle radiation therapy were identified. Five of the 11 studies included in this systematic review focused specifically on WHO grade II and III meningiomas; the others also included WHO grade I meningioma. Across all of the studies, the median follow-up ranged from 6 to 145 months. Local control rates for high-grade meningiomas ranged from 46.7% to 86% by the last follow-up or at 5 years. Overall survival rates ranged from 0% to 100% with better prognoses for atypical than for malignant meningiomas. Radiation necrosis was the most common adverse effect of treatment, occurring in 3.9% of specified cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the lack of randomized prospective trials, this review of existing retrospective studies suggests that particle therapy, whether an adjuvant or a stand-alone treatment, confers survival benefit with a relatively low risk for severe treatment-derived toxicity compared to standard photon-based therapy. However, additional controlled studies are needed.

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Krishna C. Joshi, Alankrita Raghavan, Baha’eddin Muhsen, Jason Hsieh, Hamid Borghei-Razavi, Samuel T. Chao, Gene H. Barnett, John H. Suh, Gennady Neyman, Varun R. Kshettry, Pablo F. Recinos, Alireza M. Mohammadi and Lilyana Angelov

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been successfully used for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas given its steep dose gradients and high-dose conformality. However, treatment of skull base meningiomas (SBMs) may pose significant risk to adjacent radiation-sensitive structures such as the cranial nerves. Fractionated GKRS (fGKRS) may decrease this risk, but until recently it has not been practical with traditional pin-based systems. This study reports the authors’ experience in treating SBMs with fGKRS, using a relocatable, noninvasive immobilization system.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients who underwent fGKRS for SBMs between 2013 and 2018 delivered using the Extend relocatable frame system or the Icon system. Patient demographics, pre- and post-GKRS tumor characteristics, perilesional edema, prior treatment details, and clinical symptoms were evaluated. Volumetric analysis of pre-GKRS, post-GKRS, and subsequent follow-up visits was performed.

RESULTS

Twenty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Nineteen patients were treated with the Icon system, and 6 patients were treated with the Extend system. The mean pre-fGKRS tumor volume was 7.62 cm3 (range 4.57–13.07 cm3). The median margin dose was 25 Gy delivered in 4 (8%) or 5 (92%) fractions. The median follow-up time was 12.4 months (range 4.7–17.4 months). Two patients (9%) experienced new-onset cranial neuropathy at the first follow-up. The mean postoperative tumor volume reduction was 15.9% with 6 patients (27%) experiencing improvement of cranial neuropathy at the first follow-up. Median first follow-up scans were obtained at 3.4 months (range 2.8–4.3 months). Three patients (12%) developed asymptomatic, mild perilesional edema by the first follow-up, which remained stable subsequently.

CONCLUSIONS

fGKRS with relocatable, noninvasive immobilization systems is well tolerated in patients with SBMs and demonstrated satisfactory tumor control as well as limited radiation toxicity. Future prospective studies with long-term follow-up and comparison to single-session GKRS or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy are necessary to validate these findings and determine the efficacy of this approach in the management of SBMs.

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Youlin Ge, Dong Liu, Zhiyuan Zhang, Yanhe Li, Yiguang Lin, Guokai Wang, Yongqing Zong and Enhu Liu

OBJECTIVE

The authors retrospectively analyzed the follow-up data in 130 patients with intracranial benign meningiomas after Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), evaluated the tumor progression-free survival (PFS) rate and neurological function preservation rate, and determined the predictors by univariate and multivariate survival analysis.

METHODS

This cohort of 130 patients with intracranial benign meningiomas underwent GKRS between May 2012 and May 2015 at the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University. The median age was 54.5 years (range 25–81 years), and women outnumbered men at a ratio of 4.65:1. All clinical and radiological data were obtained for analysis. No patient had undergone prior traditional radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The median tumor volume was 3.68 cm3 (range 0.23–45.78 cm3). A median margin dose of 12.0 Gy (range 10.0–16.0 Gy) was delivered to the tumor with a median isodose line of 50% (range 50%–60%).

RESULTS

During a median follow-up of 36.5 months (range 12–80 months), tumor volume regressed in 37 patients (28.5%), was unchanged in 86 patients (66.2%), and increased in 7 patients (5.4%). The actuarial tumor progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 98%, 94%, and 87% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively, after GKRS. Tumor recurred in 7 patients at a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12–56 months). Tumor volume ≥ 10 cm3 (p = 0.012, hazard ratio [HR] 8.25, 95% CI 1.60–42.65) and pre-GKRS Karnofsky Performance Scale score < 90 (p = 0.006, HR 9.31, 95% CI 1.88–46.22) were independent unfavorable predictors of PFS rate after GKRS. Of the 130 patients, 101 (77.7%) presented with one or more neurological symptoms or signs before GKRS. Neurological symptoms or signs improved in 40 (30.8%) patients, remained stable in 83 (63.8%), and deteriorated in 7 (5.4%) after GKRS. Two (1.5%) patients developed new cranial nerve (CN) deficit. Tumor volume ≥ 10 cm3 (p = 0.042, HR = 4.73, 95% CI 1.06–21.17) and pre-GKRS CN deficit (p = 0.045, HR = 4.35, 95% CI 0.84–22.48) were independent unfavorable predictors for improvement in neurological symptoms or signs. Six (4.6%) patients developed new or worsening peritumoral edema with a median follow-up of 4.5 months (range 2–7 months).

CONCLUSIONS

GKRS provided good local tumor control and high neurological function preservation in patients with intracranial benign meningiomas. Patients with tumor volume < 10 cm3, pre-GKRS Karnofsky Performance Scale score ≥ 90, and no pre-GKRS CN deficit (I–VIII) can benefit from stereotactic radiosurgery. It can be considered as the primary or adjuvant management of intracranial benign meningiomas.

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Jason J. Labuschagne and Dinoshan Chetty

The documentation and exact incidence of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS)–induced neoplasia is not well understood, with most literature restricted to single case reports and single-center retrospective reviews. The authors present a rare case of radiosurgery-induced glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) following radiosurgical treatment of a meningioma. A 74-year-old patient with a sporadic meningioma underwent radiosurgery following surgical removal of a WHO grade II meningioma. Eighteen months later she presented with seizures, and MRI revealed an intraaxial tumor, which was resected and proven to be a glioblastoma. As far as the authors are aware, this case represents the third case of GBM following SRS for a meningioma. This report serves to increase the awareness of this possible complication following SRS. The possibility of this rare complication should be explained to patients when obtaining their consent for radiosurgery.

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Güliz Acker, Anne Kluge, Mathias Lukas, Alfredo Conti, Diana Pasemann, Franziska Meinert, Phuong Thuy Anh Nguyen, Claudius Jelgersma, Franziska Loebel, Volker Budach, Peter Vajkoczy, Christian Furth, Alexander D. J. Baur and Carolin Senger

OBJECTIVE

For stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning, precise contouring of tumor boundaries and organs at risk is of utmost importance. Correct interpretation of standard neuroimaging (i.e., CT and MRI) can be challenging after previous surgeries or in cases of skull base lesions with complex shapes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI on treatment planning for image-guided SRS by CyberKnife.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively identified 11 meningioma treatments in 10 patients who received a 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI prior to SRS. The planning target volume (PTV) used for the patients’ treatment was defined as the reference standard. This was contoured by a treating radiosurgeon (RS0) using fused planning CT and PET/MRI data sets. The same tumors were then contoured by another experienced radiosurgeon (RS1) and by a less-experienced radiosurgeon (RS2), both blinded to PET data sets. A comparison of target volumes with focus on volume-based metrics and distance to critical structures was performed. RS1 and RS2 also filled in a questionnaire analyzing the confidence level and the subjective need for the implementation of PET data sets for contouring.

RESULTS

Analysis showed a subjective personal preference for PET/MRI in all cases for both radiosurgeons, particularly in proximity to critical structures. The analysis of the planning volumes per physician showed significantly smaller RS2-PTV in comparison to RS1-PTV and to RS0-PTV, whereas the median volumes were comparable between RS1-PTV and RS2-PTV (median: RS0: 4.3 cm3 [IQR 3.4–6.5 cm3] and RS1: 4.5 cm3 [IQR 2.7–6 cm3] vs RS2: 2.6 cm3 [IQR 2–5 cm3]; p = 0.003). This was also reflected in the best spatial congruency between the 2 experienced physicians (RS0 and RS1). The percentage of the left-out volume contoured by RS1 and RS2 compared to RS0 with PET/MRI demonstrated a relevant left-out-volume portion in both cases with greater extent for the less-experienced radiosurgeon (RS2) (RS1: 19.1% [IQR 8.5%–22%] vs RS2: 40.2% [IQR 34.2%–53%]). No significant differences were detected regarding investigated critical structures.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrated a relevant impact of PET/MRI on target volume delineation of meningiomas. The extent was highly dependent on the experience of the treating physician. This preliminary study supports the relevance of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI as a tool for radiosurgical treatment planning of meningiomas.