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Open access

Edward R. Bader, Adam Ammar, Adisson N. Fortunel, Rafael De la Garza Ramos, Oren Tepper, and Andrew J. Kobets

Here the authors demonstrate open craniofacial reconstruction for the correction of craniosynostosis, using techniques refined by Dr. James T. Goodrich at Montefiore Medical Center. They present the operative management of a case of unilateral coronal synostosis in a 12-month-old child, who presented with right forehead prominence and calvarial asymmetry. The patient had an excellent correction of her head shape with an uneventful postoperative course. This video highlights the authors’ multidisciplinary approach to complete cranial vault remodeling, utilizing a Marchac bandeau construct and split calvarial graft mosaic technique.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/519489422.

Open access

Giselle Coelho, Eduardo Vieira, Jose Hinojosa, and Hans Delye

Craniosynostosis is a premature fusion of cranial sutures, and it requires surgery to decrease cranial pressure and remodel the affected areas. However, mastering these procedures requires years of supervised training. Several neurosurgical training simulators have been created to shorten the learning curve. Laboratory training is fundamental for acquiring familiarity with the necessary techniques and skills to properly handle instruments. This video presents a novel simulator for training on the endoscopic treatment for scaphocephaly and trigonocephaly, covering all aspects of the procedure, from patient positioning to performing osteotomies.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/512526147.

Open access

Christopher L. Kalmar, Jordan W. Swanson, Sameer Shakir, Alexander M. Tucker, Benjamin C. Kennedy, Phillip B. Storm, Gregory G. Heuer, Scott P. Bartlett, Jesse A. Taylor, and Shih-Shan Lang

Cranial spring hardware is generally removed 3 months after placement for spring-mediated cranioplasty. Spring removal is performed as an outpatient procedure under general anesthesia in approximately 15 minutes through the incision locations of the index procedure. Herein, the authors provide a multimedia demonstration of cranial spring hardware removal after spring-mediated cranioplasty for sagittal craniosynostosis.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/511179695

Open access

Alvin Wong, Arvin R. Wali, Bryan Ryba, Mihir Gupta, Michael L. Levy, and Amanda A. Gosman

Unicoronal craniosynostosis is notoriously difficult to treat, with long-term studies demonstrating high rates of relapse and the need for reoperation using open fronto-orbital advancement. Applying the principles of distraction osteogenesis to cranial vault remodeling has demonstrated promising short-term results that compare favorably with traditional methods, with simultaneous correction of both frontofacial and endocranial morphology, along with significant increases in intracranial volume. Here, the authors demonstrate their technique for rotation flap distraction osteogenesis in the treatment of unicoronal synostosis and provide case examples.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/519505008.

Open access

Catherine Y. Wang, Alisha R. Bonaroti, Brandon A. Miller, and James Liau

Sagittal craniosynostosis, the most common form of craniosynostosis, affects 1 per 1000 live births. The main surgical treatments include endoscopic suturectomy and open cranial vault remodeling. This video describes an open reconstruction method, including strip resection of the sagittal suture, biparietal craniotomies with spiral cut cranioplasty, and barrel staves of the posterior occiput. Ideally used between 4 and 15 months of age, this approach takes advantage of the flexibility of the cranial bones to expand, allowing for immediate and long-term increases of the parietal width and correction of cosmetic deformity, without necessitating the use of cranial molding devices postoperatively.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/516699203

Open access

Edward S. Ahn and Archis R. Bhandarkar

The authors describe an endoscopic strip craniectomy through a single incision for the treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis in a young infant. The endoscopic strip craniectomy was first introduced with the use of two incisions on either end of the fused suture. This single-incision technique offers several advantages. There is a cosmetic advantage and a reduced risk of wound complications. This technique also allows for early control of emissary veins and an inside-out identification of the lambdoid sutures. Endoscopic visualization is optimized to reduce the risk of blood loss, especially because circulating blood volume is very limited in these young infants.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/514366415

Open access

Lance S. Governale and Jessica A. Ching

Craniosynostosis surgery is intended to repair cranial deformity, reduce the risk of increased intracranial pressure from cephalocranial disproportion, and reduce the risk of developmental delays. In recent years, minimally invasive surgical techniques have been developed to achieve these goals with less tissue disruption, lower rates of transfusion, and shorter recovery time. The operation focuses on unlocking the fused bones, while reshaping relies on an adjunct, most commonly a postoperative cranial molding helmet. As an alternative to the care-intensive helmeting process, reshaping with implanted cranial expander springs has emerged. In this video, the authors demonstrate their technique for spring-assisted minimally invasive repair of sagittal craniosynostosis.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/513923721

Open access

Christopher L. Kalmar, Jordan W. Swanson, Sameer Shakir, Alexander M. Tucker, Benjamin C. Kennedy, Phillip B. Storm, Gregory G. Heuer, Scott P. Bartlett, Jesse A. Taylor, and Shih-Shan Lang

Spring-mediated cranioplasty is a useful treatment modality for correcting scaphocephalic head shape in sagittal craniosynostosis because it is less invasive than whole-vault cranioplasty and offers durable morphologic outcomes. Herein, the authors provide a multimedia demonstration of alternative operative approaches for spring-mediated cranioplasty for sagittal craniosynostosis.

The video can be found here: https://vimeo.com/511256259

Open access

Marcos Dellaretti, Diego da Silveira, and Tancredo Alcântara Ferreira Junior

Cerebellar arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) comprise 10%–15% of all intracranial AVMs and have a higher risk for morbidity and mortality than supratentorial AVMs. Patients with cerebellar AVMs present with hemorrhage more often than patients with cerebral AVMs, justifying an interventional treatment. Patient outcome can be predicted with specific grade systems, guiding vascular neurosurgeons in decision-making. The authors present the case of a 42-year-old man incidentally diagnosed with an unruptured cerebellar inferior vermian AVM, which was managed through a combined strategy of preoperative endovascular embolization of the main arterial feeders followed by microsurgical resection via midline suboccipital craniotomy, with a favorable outcome.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/3WESejZbk90

Open access

Bruno Loof de Amorim, Ricardo Chmelnitsky Wainberg, Juan Alberto Paz-Archila, Silvio Sarmento Lessa, Gabriela Miroslava Bustamante Vargas, Leonardo Favi Bocca, José Maria de Campos Filho, Christiane Monteiro de Siqueira Campos, Marcos Devanir Silva da Costa, and Feres Chaddad-Neto

Posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) can be a challenging disease, especially those large in size. AVMs can be treated with a combination of endovascular treatment and microsurgery. Here, the authors present the case of a 16-year-old female patient with progressive dizziness and episodic syncope. The workup of the patient showed a hemispheric cerebellar AVM, Spetzler-Martin grade IV. She underwent combined treatment (endovascular and microsurgery) with no complications and cure of the malformation.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/rNw_Kyd76Mg