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Open access

Adaptive treatment strategy for a vestibular schwannoma in a patient with vascular Eagle syndrome: illustrative case

Nilay Karaman, Ali Haluk Düzkalir, Mehmet Orbay Askeroglu, Yunus Emre Senturk, Yavuz Samanci, and Selcuk Peker

BACKGROUND

Eagle syndrome, an uncommon condition, causes symptoms due to neural and/or vascular compression from an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament and can also complicate other planned surgical procedures.

OBSERVATIONS

A 42-year-old female with loss of balance, dizziness, and ataxic gait underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing a right-sided Koos grade IV vestibular schwannoma. Initially, a retrosigmoid craniotomy for tumor resection was planned. However, preoperative MRI and computed tomography (CT) showed a dilated right-sided mastoid emissary vein, tortuous scalp and paraspinal veins, and bilateral elongated styloid processes. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography indicated Eagle syndrome–related compression of both internal jugular veins and concurrent occlusion of the left internal jugular vein at the jugular foramen. Consequently, given the risk of damaging venous structures, Gamma Knife radiosurgery was chosen over resection.

LESSONS

This case highlights the importance of adapting treatment plans based on patient-specific anatomical and pathological factors. In situations in which traditional surgery poses risks to sensitive structures such as the venous system, alternative approaches like radiosurgery offer safer yet effective options. Comprehensive risk-benefit evaluations are crucial for such decisions.

Open access

Dorsal medullary cavernous hemangioma presenting as obstinate hiccups and its surgical treatment: illustrative case

Sumirini Puppala, Abhijit Acharya, Atmaranjan Dash, and Surjyaprakash S. Choudhury

BACKGROUND

Hiccups are characterized by involuntary, intermittent, repetitive, myoclonic, and spasmodic contractions of the diaphragm. Hiccups are termed “intractable” when they last for over 1 month.

OBSERVATIONS

A rare case of intractable hiccups due to an uncommon location of cavernous hemangioma in the dorsal medulla is illustrated. With respect to the management, surgical excision was performed, and postsurgical complete recovery was witnessed, which has been reported only in six cases worldwide to date.

LESSONS

A mechanism of the hiccups reflex arc is discussed in detail with special reference to the need for equal emphasis on evaluating central nervous system causes and peripheral etiologies for pertinent hiccups.

Open access

Dural arteriovenous fistulas misdiagnosed as intracranial neoplasms: illustrative case

Tobias Rossmann, Michael Veldeman, Ville Nurminen, Rahul Raj, and Mika Niemelä

BACKGROUND

Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF) may induce imaging findings attributable to various disease entities including malignant neoplasms. In these cases, diagnosis and adequate treatment are often delayed and patients may be exposed to spurious treatments in addition to the risks inherent to an untreated dAVF with cortical venous drainage.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report a case of a patient referred for surgical treatment of a supratentorial high-grade glioma. Thorough review of imaging data challenged the initial radiological diagnosis and led to proper angiographic workup. As a result, a high-grade dAVF was confirmed and successfully embolized. In addition to this case, we provide an extensive literature review on dAVF initially diagnosed as cerebral neoplasms, including clinical, imaging and follow-up data.

LESSONS

The literature provides diagnostic criteria for dAVF on magnetic resonance imaging; however, those criteria may be only partly applicable in many cases. Misdiagnosis of a neoplasm due to dAVF has been reported but remains rare, especially in supratentorial lesions. Digital subtraction angiography should be pursued to rule out an underlying vascular pathology if any doubt. This may prevent unnecessary interventions such as biopsies, pharmacological treatment and a delay in dAVF treatment, given its associated risk of hemorrhage and nonhemorrhagic neurological deficits.