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Open access

Focal drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy associated with an ipsilateral anterior choroidal artery aneurysm: illustrative case

H. Westley Phillips, Shivani D. Rangwala, Joanna Papadakis, David J. Segar, Melissa Tsuboyama, Anna L. R. Pinto, Joseph P. Harmon, Sulpicio G. Soriano, Carlos J. Munoz, Joseph R. Madsen, Alfred P. See, and Scellig S. Stone

BACKGROUND

The occurrence of both an intracranial aneurysm and epilepsy, especially drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE), is rare. Although the overall incidence of aneurysms associated with DRE is unclear, it is thought to be particularly infrequent in the pediatric population. Surgical ligation of the offending aneurysm has been reported in conjunction with resolving seizure activity, although few cases have cited a combined approach of aneurysm ligation and resection of an epileptogenic focus.

OBSERVATIONS

We present the case of a 14-year-old female patient with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and an ipsilateral supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. Seizure semiology, electroencephalography monitoring, and magnetic resonance imaging all indicated a left temporal epileptogenic focus, in addition to an incidental aneurysm. The authors recommended a combined surgery involving resection of the temporal lesion and surgical clip ligation of the aneurysm. Near-total resection and successful ligation were achieved, and the patient has remained seizure free since surgery at 1 year postoperatively.

LESSONS

In patients with focal DRE and an adjacent intracranial aneurysm, a combined surgical approach involving both resection and surgical ligation can be used. Several surgical timing and neuroanesthetic considerations should be made to ensure the overall safety and efficacy of this procedure.

Open access

Dorsal medullary cavernous hemangioma presenting as obstinate hiccups and its surgical treatment: illustrative case

Sumirini Puppala, Abhijit Acharya, Atmaranjan Dash, and Surjyaprakash S. Choudhury

BACKGROUND

Hiccups are characterized by involuntary, intermittent, repetitive, myoclonic, and spasmodic contractions of the diaphragm. Hiccups are termed “intractable” when they last for over 1 month.

OBSERVATIONS

A rare case of intractable hiccups due to an uncommon location of cavernous hemangioma in the dorsal medulla is illustrated. With respect to the management, surgical excision was performed, and postsurgical complete recovery was witnessed, which has been reported only in six cases worldwide to date.

LESSONS

A mechanism of the hiccups reflex arc is discussed in detail with special reference to the need for equal emphasis on evaluating central nervous system causes and peripheral etiologies for pertinent hiccups.