Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • Hydrocephalus x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Bifocal germ cell tumor of pineal germinoma and neurohypophyseal embryonal carcinoma: illustrative case

Yu Naruse, Shinya Jinguji, Ryo Hiruta, Ayako Toda, Kenichiro Nagai, Shingo Kudo, Hideki Sano, Rei Sekine, Osamu Suzuki, Mudathir Bakhit, and Masazumi Fujii

BACKGROUND

Bifocal germ cell tumors, with primarily identical tissue composition, occur concurrently in the neurohypophyseal and pineal regions.

OBSERVATIONS

A 16-year-old male patient exhibited increased intracranial pressure symptoms, with concurrent tumors in the pineal and neurohypophyseal regions, causing obstructive hydrocephalus. His serum human chorionic gonadotropin level was elevated, measuring 506.6 mIU/mL. Upon gross endoscopic examination, the pineal tumor appeared white, whereas the neurohypophyseal tumor appeared red and hemorrhagic. Because of the limited sample size of the latter, a frozen section biopsy was feasible only for the pineal lesion, which indicated the presence of a germinoma. Subsequently, carboplatin and etoposide were administered, resulting in the reduction of the pineal tumor, but no effect was observed in the neurohypophyseal tumor. Histopathological analysis confirmed the pineal lesion as a germinoma, whereas the neurohypophyseal lesion was an embryonal carcinoma. Thus, the treatment was altered to ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), leading to a response in both tumors. The patient underwent three additional cycles of ICE therapy and high-dose chemotherapy, followed by whole craniospinal irradiation, achieving complete remission.

LESSONS

Although most bifocal germ cell tumors share the same histological tissue, occasional differences may arise, necessitating separate biopsies for accurate assessment.

Open access

Approaches to ventriculoperitoneal shunt scalp erosion: countersinking into the calvarium. Illustrative case

Denise Brunozzi, Melissa A LoPresti, Jennifer L McGrath, and Tord D Alden

BACKGROUND

Ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS) is a standard procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus, and the management of its complications is common in the practice of pediatric neurosurgery. Shunt exposure, though a rare complication, can occur because of thin, fragile skin, a young patient age, protuberant hardware, poor scalp perfusion, and a multitude of other patient factors.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report a complex case of VPS erosion through the scalp in a young female with Pfeiffer syndrome treated with external ventricular drainage, empirical antibiotics, and reinternalization with countersinking of replaced shunt hardware into the calvarium to prevent internal skin pressure points, reduce wound tension, and allow wound healing.

LESSONS

Recessing the shunt hardware, or countersinking the implant, into the calvarium is a simple technique often used in functional neurosurgical implantation surgeries, providing a safe surgical strategy to optimize wound healing in select cases in which the skin flap is unfavorable.

Open access

Endoscopic placement of a triventricular stent for complex hydrocephalus and isolated fourth ventricle: illustrative case

V. Jane Horak, Beste Gulsuna, Melissa A LoPresti, and Michael DeCuypere

BACKGROUND

Hydrocephalus is commonly encountered in pediatric neurosurgery. The etiology is diverse, and complexity in management increases in patients with loculated or trapped ventricles. The authors sought to examine a treatment option of endoscopic placement of a triventricular stent in a pediatric patient with complex hydrocephalus and a trapped fourth ventricle.

OBSERVATIONS

In this case, the authors present the treatment of complex hydrocephalus with a trapped fourth ventricle in a pediatric patient using endoscopic placement of a triventricular aqueductal stent. The patient had a complex neurosurgical history, which included over 15 surgeries for shunted hydrocephalus. This case highlights the unique approach used, and the authors discuss surgical nuances of the technique, as well as learning points.

LESSONS

Complex hydrocephalus can be difficult to manage because patients often have multiple catheters, loculated or trapped ventricles, and extensive surgical histories. Endoscopic placement of a triventricular stent can decrease shunt system complexity, restore normal cerebrospinal fluid pathway circulation across the cerebral aqueduct, and promote communication between the ventricles. The authors’ treatment modality resulted in the successful resolution of the trapped fourth ventricle and symptomatic improvement in hydrocephalus.

Open access

Symptomatic obstructive hydrocephalus caused by choroid plexus hyperplasia in a pediatric patient: illustrative case

Ana Sofia Alvarez, John P McGinnis, Rajan Patel, and Howard L Weiner

BACKGROUND

Choroid plexus hyperplasia has been described as a rare cause of communicating hydrocephalus due to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) overproduction. However, this is the first report of symptomatic obstructive hydrocephalus caused by mechanical obstruction of the aqueduct by a hyperplastic choroid plexus.

OBSERVATIONS

A 4-year-old male presented with headaches and intermittent emesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed abnormal enlargement of the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricles with extension into the third ventricle, resulting in obstruction of the aqueduct of Sylvius, leading to obstructive hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) was chosen as the surgical treatment. During the procedure, high pressure flow of clear CSF was noted. Normal intraventricular anatomy was identified, and no cyst or tumor was found. The postoperative MRI showed a patent third ventriculostomy, without complication, and a significant decrease in supratentorial ventricular size. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery with a complete resolution of symptoms.

LESSONS

Choroid plexus hyperplasia has the potential to cause obstructive hydrocephalus, and it can be effectively treated with ETV. Our hypothesis is that the change in pressure caused by the procedure may have led to an uncorking of the aqueduct by the hyperplastic choroid plexus, contributing to the observed improvement.

Open access

Removal of a flanged ventricular catheter: illustrative case

M. Benjamin Larkin, Tyler T. Lazaro, Howard L. Weiner, and William E. Whitehead

BACKGROUND

Flanged ventricular catheters were created in the 1970s to decrease shunt failure by preventing the holes at the catheter tip from contacting the choroid plexus. However, the flanges on the catheter frequently scarred within and tether to the choroid plexus, resulting in higher rates of intraventricular hemorrhage when removed. Today, flanged catheters are rarely encountered.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors describe an illustrative case of a 7-year-old girl recently adopted from another country with a history of myelomeningocele and shunted hydrocephalus. She had been treated with a flanged catheter at birth. She presented with a shunt infection, which required removal of the flanged catheter tethered to the choroid.

LESSONS

The authors illustrate the safe removal of a posterior-entry flanged ventricular catheter tethered to the choroid plexus using monopolar flexible electrocautery. The removal was monitored with a flexible endoscope inserted from an ipsilateral anterior burr hole and was followed by an endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

Open access

Severe hyperglycorrhachia and status epilepticus after endoscopic aqueductoplasty: illustrative case

Anand A. Dharia, Ahmad Masri, Jay F. Rilinger, and Christian B. Kaufman

BACKGROUND

While hypoglycorrhachia is observed and managed frequently, there are few reports in the literature of clinically significant hyperglycorrhachia after neurosurgery. Understanding the effects and management of severe hyperglycorrhachia is important to the neurosurgeon and neurocritical care teams who care for patients in these rare scenarios.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present the case of a 3-month-old male with congenital hydrocephalus who faced profound hyperglycorrhachia and status epilepticus after an endoscopic aqueductoplasty using an irrigant composed of lactated Ringer’s solution with dextrose 5% in water. A multidisciplinary approach was developed to monitor and treat the patient’s seizures and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) osmolytes.

LESSONS

This case provides several learning opportunities for understanding CSF physiology, pathogenesis of common brain injuries related to osmotic shifts and inflammatory states, as well as clinical management of hyperglycorrhachia. It also reiterates the significance of meticulous intraoperative assessment to avoid preventable medical errors.

Open access

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy of a tectal lesion using flexible neuroendoscopy and urological cup forceps: illustrative case

Meredith Yang, Daniel Wolfson, Melissa A. LoPresti, Emma Poland, Sandi Lam, and Michael DeCuypere

BACKGROUND

Tectal region tumors often clinically present as obstructive hydrocephalus due to mass effect on the outflow of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. Pathology in this region varies; thus, biopsy can be of great value in the management decision making. Appropriate instrumentation remains an area of interest to further advance flexible neuroendoscopic techniques and applications.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors report an illustrative case using flexible neuroendoscopy through a single burr hole for simultaneous endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and tectal tumor biopsy using urological cup forceps in a 13-year-old boy who had presented with obstructive hydrocephalus.

LESSONS

The authors demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous ETV and tectal lesion biopsy via flexible neuroendoscopy to address obstructive hydrocephalus and obtain a tissue biopsy in a single-site procedure. They found that the use of flexible cup forceps designed for uroscopy is an important complement to flexible neuroendoscopy. Given the evolving applications of flexible neuroendoscopy, this has implications for instrumentation adaptation and future design.

Open access

A deceptive mass on neonatal ultrasound and a fetal brain MRI-confirmed complex dural arteriovenous fistula postnatally: illustrative case

Elliot T. Varney, Charlotte S. Taylor, Allen G. Crosthwait, Kristin Weaver, and Todd Nichols

BACKGROUND

Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) are direct, aberrant connections between dural arteries and cerebral veins. In neonates, delayed diagnosis results in grim outcomes. Treatment involves endovascular management because of its success and tolerability. Here, the authors present a case of a complex dAVF initially recognized with an in utero neurosonogram and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

OBSERVATIONS

A 21-week fetal ultrasound of a nonspecific brain mass was confirmed with fetal MRI as a 2.7-cm T1-hyperintense posterior fossa mass. Although a large flow void in the left middle cranial fossa was present, postnatal computed tomography angiography ultimately revealed a high-flow dAVF communicating with the left transverse sinus. In the early postnatal period, the patient developed hydrocephalus. After successful partial embolization, 6-week postangiogram brain MRI indicated disease progression with the development of a venous varix causing brainstem compression. Repeat embolization resulted in complete cessation of early venous drainage.

LESSONS

Neonatal dAVFs are exceedingly rare and result in futile outcomes; however, detection in utero is possible. Although definitive therapy must be performed postnatally, constant monitoring and early delivery can prevent complications. Attention to fetal ultrasound is essential, and knowledge of fetal MRI in the detection of these complex lesions can significantly improve outcomes.

Open access

Postinfectious coronavirus disease 2019 hemorrhagic cerebellitis: illustrative case

Eric K. H. Chow, Barry M. Rabin, and John Ruge

BACKGROUND

Conditions that can mimic posterior fossa tumors are rare. Their identification is crucial to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention, especially when prompt initiation of medical therapy is critical.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors presented a case of pseudotumoral hemorrhagic cerebellitis in a 3-year-old boy who presented initially with headache, persistent vomiting, and decreased level of consciousness 9 weeks after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a left cerebellar hemorrhagic mass–like lesion with edema and mild hydrocephalus. The patient responded to high-dose steroids and was discharged 2 weeks later with complete recovery.

LESSONS

When evaluating patients with possible tumor syndromes, it is important to also consider rarer inflammatory syndromes that can masquerade as neoplasms. Postinfectious hemorrhagic cerebellitis is one such syndrome.

Open access

Conservative management of intraventricular migration of a gelatin sponge: illustrative case

Katherine G. Holste, Bridger Rodoni, Arushi Tripathy, Jaes C. Jones, Sara Saleh, and Hugh J. L. Garton

BACKGROUND

Gelatin sponges, such as Gelfoam, are used as hemostatic agents during surgery and are generally absorbed over the course of 4–6 weeks in most body cavities. The time course of the dissolution of Gelfoam sponges within the cerebral ventricles has not been described.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present a case of intraventricular migration of Gelfoam after ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in a 6-week-old infant. The infant was imaged regularly after ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and the Gelfoam sponge persisted within the ventricles on all images until 11 months after surgery. At no time during follow-up did the patient have any symptoms of hydrocephalus requiring retrieval of the sponge or shunt revision.

LESSONS

This is the first case describing time until absorption of a gelatin sponge within the ventricle and successful conservative management.