Browse

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Endovascular Neurosurgery x
  • Vascular Disorders x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All
Open access

Cerebral arterial vasospasm complicating supratentorial meningioma resection: illustrative cases

Andrew C Pickles, John T Tsiang, Alexandria A Pecoraro, Nathan C Pecoraro, Ronak H Jani, Brandon J Bond, Anand V Germanwala, Joseph C Serrone, and Vikram C Prabhu

BACKGROUND

Cerebral arterial vasospasm is a rare complication after supratentorial meningioma resection. The pathophysiology of this condition may be similar to vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and treatment options may be similar.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors present two cases of cerebral vasospasm after supratentorial meningioma resection and perform a systematic literature review of similar cases.

LESSONS

Cerebral arterial vasospasm after supratentorial meningioma resection may be associated with significant morbidity due to cerebral ischemia if not addressed in a timely manner. Treatment paradigms may be adopted from the management of arterial vasospasm associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Open access

Vascular steal and associated intratumoral aneurysms in highly vascular brain tumors: illustrative case

Christopher S. Hong, Neelan J. Marianayagam, Saul F. Morales-Valero, Tanyeri Barak, Joanna K. Tabor, Joseph O’Brien, Anita Huttner, Joachim Baehring, Murat Gunel, E. Zeynep Erson-Omay, Robert K. Fulbright, Charles C. Matouk, and Jennifer Moliterno

BACKGROUND

Intratumoral aneurysms in highly vascular brain tumors can complicate resection depending on their location and feasibility of proximal control. Seemingly unrelated neurological symptoms may be from vascular steal that can help alert the need for additional vascular imaging and augmenting surgical strategies.

OBSERVATIONS

A 29-year-old female presented with headaches and unilateral blurred vision, secondary to a large right frontal dural-based lesion with hypointense signal thought to represent calcifications. Given these latter findings and clinical suspicion for a vascular steal phenomenon to explain the blurred vision, computed tomography angiography was obtained, revealing a 4 × 2–mm intratumoral aneurysm. Diagnostic cerebral angiography confirmed this along with vascular steal by the tumor from the right ophthalmic artery. The patient underwent endovascular embolization of the intratumoral aneurysm, followed by open tumor resection in the same setting without complication, minimal blood loss, and improvement in her vision.

LESSONS

Understanding the blood supply of any tumor, but highly vascular ones in particular, and the relationship with normal vasculature is undeniably important in avoiding potentially dangerous situations and optimizing maximal safe resection. Recognition of highly vascular tumors should prompt thorough understanding of the vascular supply and relationship of intracranial vasculature with consideration of endovascular adjuncts when appropriate.

Open access

Cerebral tumor embolism from thyroid cancer treated by mechanical thrombectomy: illustrative case

Yuta Fujiwara, Kentaro Hayashi, Yohei Shibata, Tatsuya Furuta, Tomohiro Yamasaki, Kazuhiro Yamamoto, Masahiro Uchimura, Fumio Nakagawa, Mizuki Kambara, Hidemasa Nagai, and Yasuhiko Akiyama

BACKGROUND

Development in mechanical thrombectomy is progressing dramatically. Tumor embolism has been rarely reported on the basis of pathological study of the retrieved thrombus. Herein, the authors report a case of cerebral tumor embolism from advanced thyroid cancer, which was successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy.

OBSERVATIONS

A 57-year-old man was diagnosed with thyroid cancer with multiple lung metastases and chemotherapy was planned. He experienced left hemiparesis and was bought to the emergency section of the authors’ hospital. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion and endovascular treatment was performed. Using a combination of aspiration catheter and stent retriever, white jelly-like embolus was retrieved. The pathological study demonstrated thyroid cancer embolism. Pulmonary vein invasion following lung metastasis of thyroid cancer was most presumably the cause of the tumor embolism.

LESSONS

Lung metastasis invading the pulmonary vein may be a cause of tumor embolism. Mechanical thrombectomy using a combination of stent retriever and aspiration catheter is effective in removing the tumor embolus and the pathological examination of the embolus is essential.