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Alex P. Michael, Osama Elbuluk, Apostolos John Tsiouris, Abtin Tabaee, Ashutosh Kacker, Vijay K. Anand, and Theodore H. Schwartz

OBJECTIVE

Spontaneous CSF leaks into the anterior skull base nasal sinuses are often associated with meningoencephaloceles and occur in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Endonasal endoscopic repair has become the primary method of choice for repair. The authors sought to evaluate the success rate of endoscopic closure and to identify predictive factors for CSF leak recurrence.

METHODS

A consecutive series of endonasally repaired anterior skull base meningoencephaloceles was drawn from a prospectively acquired database. Lumbar punctures were not performed as part of a treatment algorithm. All patients had at least 5 months of follow-up. Chart review and phone calls were used to determine the timing and predictors of recurrence. Demographic information and details of operative technique were correlated with recurrence. Two independent radiologists reviewed all preoperative imaging to identify radiographic markers of IIH, as well as the location and size of the meningoencephalocele.

RESULTS

From a total of 54 patients there were 5 with recurrences (9.3%), but of the 39 patients in whom a vascularized nasoseptal (n = 31) or turbinate (n = 8) flap was used there were no recurrences (p = 0.0009). The mean time to recurrence was 24.8 months (range 9–38 months). There was a trend to higher BMI in patients whose leak recurred (mean [± SD] 36.6 ± 8.6) compared with those whose leak did not recur (31.8 ± 7.4; p = 0.182). Although the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus was the most common site of meningoencephalocele, the fovea ethmoidalis was the most common site in recurrent cases (80%; p = 0.013). However, a vascularized flap was used in significantly more patients with sphenoid (78.3%) defects than in patients with fovea ethmoidalis (28.6%) defects (Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.005). Radiographic signs of IIH were equally present in all patients whose leak recurred (75%) compared with patients whose leak did not recur (63.3%); however, an enlarged Meckel cave was present in 100% (2/2) of patients whose leaks recurred compared with 13.3% (4/30) of patients whose leaks did not recur (p = 0.03). The average meningoencephalocele diameter tended to be larger (1.73 ± 1.3 cm) in patients with recurrence compared to those without recurrence (1.2 ± 0.66 cm; p = 0.22). A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was already in place in 3 patients, placed perioperatively in 5, and placed at recurrence in 2, none of whose leaks recurred.

CONCLUSIONS

Recurrence after endonasal repair of spontaneous CSF leaks from meningoencephaloceles can be dramatically reduced with the use of a vascularized flap. Although failures of endonasal repair tend to occur in patients who have higher BMI, larger brain herniations, and no CSF diversion, the lack of vascularized flap was the single most important risk factor predictive of failure.

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Allan D. Levi and Jan M. Schwab

The corticospinal tract (CST) is the preeminent voluntary motor pathway that controls human movements. Consequently, long-standing interest has focused on CST location and function in order to understand both loss and recovery of neurological function after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury, such as traumatic central cord syndrome. The hallmark clinical finding is paresis of the hands and upper-extremity function with retention of lower-extremity movements, which has been attributed to injury and the sparing of specific CST fibers. In contrast to historical concepts that proposed somatotopic (laminar) CST organization, the current narrative summarizes the accumulated evidence that 1) there is no somatotopic organization of the corticospinal tract within the spinal cord in humans and 2) the CST is critically important for hand function. The evidence includes data from 1) tract-tracing studies of the central nervous system and in vivo MRI studies of both humans and nonhuman primates, 2) selective ablative studies of the CST in primates, 3) evolutionary assessments of the CST in mammals, and 4) neuropathological examinations of patients after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury involving the CST and prominent arm and hand dysfunction. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome is characterized by prominent upper-extremity dysfunction, which has been falsely predicated on pinpoint injury to an assumed CST layer that specifically innervates the hand muscles. Given the evidence surveyed herein, the pathophysiological mechanism is most likely related to diffuse injury to the CST that plays a critically important role in hand function.

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Anshit Goyal, Jad Zreik, Desmond A. Brown, Panagiotis Kerezoudis, Elizabeth B. Habermann, Kaisorn L. Chaichana, Clark C. Chen, Mohamad Bydon, and Ian F. Parney

OBJECTIVE

Although it has been shown that surgery for glioblastoma (GBM) at high-volume facilities (HVFs) may be associated with better postoperative outcomes, the use of such hospitals may not be equally distributed. The authors aimed to evaluate racial and socioeconomic differences in access to surgery for GBM at high-volume Commission on Cancer (CoC)–accredited hospitals.

METHODS

The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with GBM that was newly diagnosed between 2004 and 2015. Patients who received no surgical intervention or those who received surgical intervention at a site other than the reporting facility were excluded. Annual surgical case volume was calculated for each hospital, with volume ≥ 90th percentile defined as an HVF. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify patient-level predictors for undergoing surgery at an HVF. Furthermore, multiple subgroup analyses were performed to determine the adjusted odds ratio of the likelihood of undergoing surgery at an HVF in 2016 as compared to 2004 for each patient subpopulation (by age, race, sex, educational group, etc.).

RESULTS

A total of 51,859 patients were included, with 10.7% (n = 5562) undergoing surgery at an HVF. On multivariable analysis, Hispanic White patients (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.49–0.69, p < 0.001) were found to have significantly lower odds of undergoing surgery at an HVF (reference = non-Hispanic White). In addition, patients from a rural residential location (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.41–0.72, p < 0.001; reference = metropolitan); patients with nonprivate insurance status (Medicare [OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71–0.86, p < 0.001], Medicaid [OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.60–0.78, p < 0001], other government insurance [OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.52–0.86, p = 0.002], or who were uninsured [OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51–0.72, p < 0.001]); and lower-income patients ($50,354–$63,332 [OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.63–0.74, p < 0.001], $40,227–$50,353 [OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76–0.92, p < 0.001]; reference = ≥ $63,333) were also found to be significantly associated with a lower likelihood of surgery at an HVF. Subgroup analyses revealed that elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years), both male and female patients and non-Hispanic White patients, and those with private insurance, Medicare, metropolitan residential location, median zip code–level household income in the first and second quartiles, and educational attainment in the first and third quartiles had increased odds of undergoing surgery at an HVF in 2016 compared to 2004 (all p ≤ 0.05). On the other hand, patients with other governmental insurance, patients with a rural residence, and those from a non-White racial category did not show a significant difference in odds of surgery at an HVF over time (all p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The present analysis from the National Cancer Database revealed significant disparities in access to surgery at an HVF for GBM within the United States. Furthermore, there was evidence that these racial and socioeconomic disparities may have widened between 2004 and 2016. The findings should assist health policy makers in the development of strategies for improving access to HVFs for racially and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations.

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Roberto J. Perez-Roman, Wendy Gaztanaga, Victor M. Lu, and Michael Y. Wang

OBJECTIVE

Lumbar stenosis treatment has evolved with the introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques. Endoscopic methods take the concepts applied to MIS a step further, with multiple studies showing that endoscopic techniques have outcomes that are similar to those of more traditional approaches. The aim of this study was to perform an updated meta-analysis and systematic review of studies comparing the outcomes between endoscopic (uni- and biportal) and microscopic techniques for the treatment of lumbar stenosis.

METHODS

Following PRISMA guidelines, a systematic search was performed using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Ovid Embase, and PubMed databases from their dates of inception to December 14, 2020. All identified articles were then systematically screened against the following inclusion criteria: 1) studies comparing endoscopic (either uniportal or biportal) with minimally invasive approaches, 2) patient age ≥ 18 years, and 3) diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis. Bias was assessed using quality assessment criteria and funnel plots. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was used to synthesize the metadata.

RESULTS

From a total of 470 studies, 14 underwent full-text assessment. Of these 14 studies, 13 comparative studies were included for quantitative analysis, totaling 1406 procedures satisfying all criteria for selection. Regarding postoperative back pain, 9 studies showed that endoscopic methods resulted in significantly lower pain scores compared with MIS (mean difference [MD] −1.0, 95% CI −1.6 to −0.4, p < 0.01). The length of stay data were reported by 7 studies, with endoscopic methods associated with a significantly shorter length of stay versus the MIS technique (MD −2.1 days, 95% CI −2.7 to −1.4, p < 0.01). There was no significant difference with respect to leg visual analog scale scores, Oswestry Disability Index scores, blood loss, surgical time, and complications, and there were not any significant quality or bias concerns.

CONCLUSIONS

Both endoscopic and MIS techniques are safe and effective methods for treating patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Patients who undergo endoscopic surgery seem to report less postoperative low-back pain and significantly reduced hospital stay with a trend toward less perioperative blood loss. Future large prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm the findings in this study.

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*Jaejoon Lim, Kyoung Su Sung, Woohyun Kim, Jihwan Yoo, In-Ho Jung, Seonah Choi, Seung Hoon Lim, Tae Hoon Roh, Chang-Ki Hong, and Ju Hyung Moon

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic transorbital approach (ETOA) has been developed, permitting a new surgical corridor. Due to the vertical limitation of the ETOA, some lesions of the anterior cranial fossa are difficult to access. The ETOA with superior-lateral orbital rim (SLOR) osteotomy can achieve surgical freedom of vertical as well as horizontal movement. The purpose of this study was to confirm the feasibility of the ETOA with SLOR osteotomy.

METHODS

Anatomical dissections were performed in 5 cadaveric heads with a neuroendoscope and neuronavigation system. ETOA with SLOR osteotomy was performed on one side of the head, and ETOA with lateral orbital rim (LOR) osteotomy was performed on the other side. After analysis of the results of the cadaveric study, the ETOA with SLOR osteotomy was applied in 6 clinical cases.

RESULTS

The horizontal and vertical movement range through ETOA with SLOR osteotomy (43.8° ± 7.49° and 36.1° ± 3.32°, respectively) was improved over ETOA with LOR osteotomy (31.8° ± 5.49° and 23.3° ± 1.34°, respectively) (p < 0.01). Surgical freedom through ETOA with SLOR osteotomy (6025.1 ± 220.1 mm3) was increased relative to ETOA with LOR osteotomy (4191.3 ± 57.2 mm3) (p < 0.01); these values are expressed as the mean ± SD. Access levels of ETOA with SLOR osteotomy were comfortable, including anterior skull base lesion and superior orbital area. The view range of the endoscope for anterior skull base lesions was increased through ETOA with SLOR osteotomy. After SLOR osteotomy, the space for moving surgical instruments and the endoscope was widened. Anterior clinoidectomy could be achieved successfully using ETOA with SLOR osteotomy.

The authors performed ETOA with SLOR osteotomy in 6 cases of brain tumor. In all 6 cases, complete removal of the tumor was successfully accomplished. In the 3 cases of anterior clinoidal meningioma, anterior clinoidectomy was performed easily and safely, and manipulation of the extended dural margin and origin dura mater was possible. There was no complication related to this approach.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors evaluated the clinical feasibility of ETOA with SLOR osteotomy based on a cadaveric study. ETOA with SLOR osteotomy could be applied to more diverse disease groups that do not permit conventional ETOA or to cases in which surgical application is challenging. ETOA with SLOR osteotomy might serve as an opportunity to broaden the indication for the ETOA.

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Anna-Katharina Meißner, Lena Dreher, Stephanie Theresa Jünger, Veerle Visser-Vandewalle, Maximilian I. Ruge, and Daniel Rueß

OBJECTIVE

The treatment of symptomatic, progressive or recurrent acquired intracerebral cysts is challenging, especially when they are localized in eloquent structures. In addition to resection, endoscopic fenestration, or stereotactic puncture, the implantation of a cystoventricular shunt by stereotactic guidance (SCVS) has been reported as a minimally invasive procedure; however, only scarce data are available regarding its feasibility and efficacy. Here, the authors evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of frame-based SCVS in patients with acquired intracranial cysts.

METHODS

In this single-center retrospective analysis, the authors included all patients with acquired intracerebral cysts treated by SCVS following a standardized prospective protocol between 2012 and 2020. They analyzed clinical symptoms, complications, and radiological outcome with regard to cyst volume reduction by 3D volumetry.

RESULTS

Thirty-four patients (17 females and 17 males; median age 44 years, range 5–77 years) were identified. The median initial cyst volume was 11.5 cm3 (range 1.6–71.6 cm3), and the mean follow-up was 20 months (range 1–82 months). At the last follow-up, 27 of 34 patients (79%) showed a cyst volume reduction of more than 50%. Initial symptoms improved or resolved in 74% (n = 25) and remained stable in 24% (n = 8). No permanent clinical deterioration after treatment was observed. The total complication rate was 5.9%, comprising transient neurological deterioration (n = 1) and ventriculitis (n = 1). There were no deaths. The overall recurrence rate was 11.8%.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, SCVS proved to be a safe, minimally invasive, and effective treatment with reliable long-term volume reduction, resulting in clinical improvement and a minor complication rate.

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Jay Riva-Cambrin, Abhaya V. Kulkarni, Robert Burr, Curtis J. Rozzelle, W. Jerry Oakes, James M. Drake, Jessica S. Alvey, Ron W. Reeder, Richard Holubkov, Samuel R. Browd, D. Douglas Cochrane, David D. Limbrick, Robert Naftel, Chevis N. Shannon, Tamara D. Simon, Mandeep S. Tamber, Patrick J. McDonald, John C. Wellons III, Thomas G. Luerssen, William E. Whitehead, and John R. W. Kestle

OBJECTIVE

In pediatric hydrocephalus, shunts tend to result in smaller postoperative ventricles compared with those following an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The impact of the final treated ventricle size on neuropsychological and quality-of-life outcomes is currently undetermined. Therefore, the authors sought to ascertain whether treated ventricle size is associated with neurocognitive and academic outcomes postoperatively.

METHODS

This prospective cohort study included children aged 5 years and older at the first diagnosis of hydrocephalus at 8 Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network sites from 2011 to 2015. The treated ventricle size, as measured by the frontal and occipital horn ratio (FOR), was compared with 25 neuropsychological tests 6 months postoperatively after adjusting for age, hydrocephalus etiology, and treatment type (ETV vs shunt). Pre- and posttreatment grade point average (GPA), quality-of-life measures (Hydrocephalus Outcome Questionnaire [HOQ]), and a truncated preoperative neuropsychological battery were also compared with the FOR.

RESULTS

Overall, 60 children were included with a mean age of 10.8 years; 17% had ≥ 1 comorbidity. Etiologies for hydrocephalus were midbrain lesions (37%), aqueductal stenosis (22%), posterior fossa tumors (13%), and supratentorial tumors (12%). ETV (78%) was more commonly used than shunting (22%). Of the 25 neuropsychological tests, including full-scale IQ (q = 0.77), 23 tests showed no univariable association with postoperative ventricle size. Verbal learning delayed recall (p = 0.006, q = 0.118) and visual spatial judgment (p = 0.006, q = 0.118) were negatively associated with larger ventricles and remained significant after multivariate adjustment for age, etiology, and procedure type. However, neither delayed verbal learning (p = 0.40) nor visual spatial judgment (p = 0.22) was associated with ventricle size change with surgery. No associations were found between postoperative ventricle size and either GPA or the HOQ.

CONCLUSIONS

Minimal associations were found between the treated ventricle size and neuropsychological, academic, or quality-of-life outcomes for pediatric patients in this comprehensive, multicenter study that encompassed heterogeneous hydrocephalus etiologies.

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Charlotte Y. Adegeest, Jort A. N. van Gent, Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swüste, Marcel W. M. Post, William P. Vandertop, F. Cumhur Öner, Wilco C. Peul, and Paula V. ter Wengel

OBJECTIVE

Secondary health conditions (SHCs) are long-term complications that frequently occur due to traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and can negatively affect quality of life in this patient population. This study provides an overview of the associations between the severity and level of injury and the occurrence of SHCs in tSCI.

METHODS

A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Embase that retrieved 44 studies on the influence of severity and/or level of injury on the occurrence of SHCs in the subacute and chronic phase of tSCI (from 3 months after trauma). The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed.

RESULTS

In the majority of studies, patients with motor-complete tSCI (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS] grade A or B) had a significantly increased occurrence of SHCs in comparison to patients with motor-incomplete tSCI (AIS grade C or D), such as respiratory and urogenital complications, musculoskeletal disorders, pressure ulcers, and autonomic dysreflexia. In contrast, an increased prevalence of pain was seen in patients with motor-incomplete injuries. In addition, higher rates of pulmonary infections, spasticity, and autonomic dysreflexia were observed in patients with tetraplegia. Patients with paraplegia more commonly suffered from hypertension, venous thromboembolism, and pain.

CONCLUSIONS

This review suggests that patients with a motor-complete tSCI have an increased risk of developing SHCs during the subacute and chronic stage of tSCI in comparison with patients with motor-incomplete tSCI. Future studies should examine whether systematic monitoring during rehabilitation and the subacute and chronic phase in patients with motor-complete tSCI could lead to early detection and potential prevention of SHCs in this population.

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Awinita Barpujari, Vamsi P. Reddy, and Stacey Quintero Wolfe