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Manish N. Shah, Jeffrey R. Leonard, Gabrielle Inder, Feng Gao, Michael Geske, Devon H. Haydon, Melvin E. Omodon, John Evans, Diego Morales, Ralph G. Dacey, Matthew D. Smyth, Michael R. Chicoine, and David D. Limbrick

Object

This study describes the pediatric experience with a dual-multifunction-room IMRIS 1.5-T intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) suite and analyzes its impact on clinical variables associated with neurosurgical resection of intracranial lesions, including safety and efficacy.

Methods

Since the inception of the iMRI–guided resection program in April 2008 at both Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's Hospital, a prospective database recorded the clinical variables associated with demographics and outcome with institutional review board approval. A similarly approved retrospective database was constructed from February 2006 to March 2010 for non–iMRI resections. These databases were retrospectively reviewed for clinical variables associated with resection of pediatric (age 20 months–21 years) intracranial lesions including brain tumors and focal cortical dysplasia. Patient demographics, operative time, estimated blood loss, additional resection, length of stay, pathology, and complications were analyzed.

Results

The authors found that 42 iMRI–guided resections were performed, whereas 103 conventional resections had been performed without the iMRI. The mean patient age was 10.5 years (range 20 months–20 years) in the iMRI group and 9.8 years (range 2–21 years) in the conventional group (p = 0.41). The mean duration of surgery was 350 minutes in the iMRI group and 243 minutes in the conventional group (p < 0.0001). The mean hospital stay was 8.2 days in the iMRI group, and 6.6 days in the conventional group, and this trended toward significance (p = 0.05). In the first 2 weeks postoperatively, there were 8 reoperations (7.77%) in the conventional group compared with none in the iMRI group, which was not significant in a 2-tailed test (p = 0.11) but trended toward significance in a 1-tailed test (p = 0.06). The significant complications included reoperation for hydrocephalus or infection: 6.8% (conventional) versus 4.8% (iMRI).

Conclusions

Intraoperative MR imaging–guided resections resulted in a trend toward reduction in the need for repeat surgery in the immediate 2-week postoperative period compared with conventional pediatric neurosurgical resections for tumor or focal cortical dysplasia. Although there is an increased operative time, the iMRI suite offers a comparable safety and efficacy profile while potentially reducing the per-case cost by diminishing the need for early reoperation.

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Robert T. Buckley, Weihong Yuan, Francesco T. Mangano, Jannel M. Phillips, Stephanie Powell, Robert C. McKinstry, Akila Rajagopal, Blaise V. Jones, Scott Holland, and David D. Limbrick Jr.

The authors report the case of a 25-month-old boy who underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) for hydrocephalus resulting from aqueductal stenosis. The patient's recovery was monitored longitudinally and prospectively using MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and formal neuropsychological testing. Despite minimal change in ventricle size, improvement in the DTI characteristics and neurodevelopmental trajectory was observed following ETV. These data support the use of DTI as a biomarker to assess therapeutic response in children undergoing surgical treatment for hydrocephalus. In the patient featured in this report, DTI appeared to provide more information regarding postoperative neurodevelopmental outcome than ventricle size alone.

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David D. Limbrick Jr., Stephen Lake, Michael Talcott, Benjamin Alexander, Samuel Wight, Jon T. Willie, William D. Richard, Guy M. Genin, and Eric C. Leuthardt

Object

Prompt diagnosis of shunt malfunction is critical in preventing neurological morbidity and death in individuals with hydrocephalus; however, diagnostic methods for this condition remain limited. For several decades, investigators have sought a long-term, implantable intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor to assist in the diagnosis of shunt malfunction, but efforts have been impeded by device complexity, marked measurement drift, and limited instrumentation lifespan. In the current report, the authors introduce an entirely novel, simple, compressible gas design that addresses each of these problems.

Methods

The device described herein, termed the “baric probe,” consists of a subdural fluid bladder and multichannel indicator that monitors the position of an air-fluid interface (AFI). A handheld ultrasound probe is used to interrogate the baric probe in vivo, permitting noninvasive ICP determination. To assess the function of device prototypes, ex vivo experiments were conducted using a water column, and short- and long-term in vivo experiments were performed using a porcine model with concurrent measurements of ICP via a fiberoptic monitor.

Results

Following a toe region of approximately 2 cm H2O, the baric probe's AFI demonstrated a predictable linear relationship to ICP in both ex vivo and in vivo models. After a 2-week implantation of the device, this linear relationship remained robust and reproducible. Further, changes in ICP were observed with the baric probe, on average, 3 seconds in advance of the fiberoptic ICP monitor reading.

Conclusions

The authors demonstrate “proof-of-concept” and feasibility for the baric probe, a long-term implantable ICP monitor designed to facilitate the prompt and accurate diagnosis of shunt malfunction. The baric probe showed a consistent linear relationship between ICP and the device's AFI in ex vivo and short- and long-term in vivo models. With a low per-unit cost, a reduced need for radiography or CT, and an indicator that can be read with a handheld ultrasound probe that interfaces with any smart phone, the baric probe promises to simplify the care of patients with shunt-treated hydrocephalus throughout both the developed and the developing world.

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S. Kathleen Bandt, Jacob K. Greenberg, Chester K. Yarbrough, Kenneth B. Schechtman, David D. Limbrick, and Jeffrey R. Leonard

Object

There has been an increase in civilian gun violence since the late 1980s, with a disproportionately high increase occurring within the pediatric population. To date, no definite treatment paradigm exists for the management of these patients, nor is there a full understanding of the predictors of favorable clinical outcome in this population.

Methods

The authors completed a retrospective review of all victims of intracranial gunshot injury from birth to age 18 years at a major metropolitan Level 1 trauma center (n = 48) from 2002 to 2011. The predictive values of widely accepted adult clinical and radiographic factors for poor prognosis were investigated.

Results

Eight statistically significant factors (p < 0.05) for favorable outcome were identified. These factors include single hemispheric involvement, absence of a transventricular trajectory, < 3 lobes involved, ≥ 1 reactive pupil on arrival, systolic blood pressure > 100 mm Hg on arrival, absence of deep nuclei and/or third ventricular involvement, initial ICP < 30 mm Hg when monitored, and absence of midline shift. Of these 8 factors, 5 were strong predictors of favorable clinical outcome as defined by Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. These predictive factors included absence of a transventricular trajectory, < 3 lobes involved, ≥ 1 reactive pupil on arrival, absence of deep nuclei and/or third ventricular involvement, and initial ICP < 30 mm Hg. These findings form the basis of the St. Louis Scale for Pediatric Gunshot Wounds to the Head, a novel metric to inform treatment decisions for pediatric patients who sustain these devastating injuries.

Conclusions

The pediatric population tends to demonstrate more favorable outcomes following intracranial gunshot injury when compared with the adult population; therefore some patients may benefit from more aggressive treatment than is considered for adults. The St. Louis Scale for Pediatric Gunshot Wounds to the Head may provide critical data toward evidence-based guidelines for clinical decision making.

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Abhaya V. Kulkarni, Jay Riva-Cambrin, Jerry Butler, Samuel R. Browd, James M. Drake, Richard Holubkov, John R. W. Kestle, David D. Limbrick, Tamara D. Simon, Mandeep S. Tamber, John C. Wellons III, William E. Whitehead, and for the Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network

Object

The Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN), which comprises 7 pediatric neurosurgical centers in North America, provides a unique multicenter assessment of the current outcomes of CSF shunting in nonselected patients. The authors present the initial results for this cohort and compare them with results from prospective multicenter trials performed in the 1990s.

Methods

Analysis was restricted to patients with newly diagnosed hydrocephalus undergoing shunting for the first time. Detailed perioperative data from 2008 through 2012 for all HCRN centers were prospectively collected and centrally stored by trained research coordinators. Historical control data were obtained from the Shunt Design Trial (1993–1995) and the Endoscopic Shunt Insertion Trial (1996–1999). The primary outcome was time to first shunt failure, which was determined by using Cox regression survival analysis.

Results

Mean age of the 1184 patients in the HCRN cohort was older than mean age of the 720 patients in the historical cohort (2.51 years vs 1.60 years, p < 0.0001). The distribution of etiologies differed (p < 0.0001, chi-square test); more tumors and fewer myelomeningoceles caused the hydrocephalus in the HCRN cohort patients. The hazard ratio for first shunt failure significantly favored the HCRN cohort, even after the model was adjusted for the prognostic effects of age and etiology (adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.69–0.96).

Conclusions

Current outcomes of shunting in general pediatric neurosurgery practice have improved over those from the 1990s, although the reasons remain unclear.

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Ralph G. Dacey Jr., Gregory J. Zipfel, and David D. Limbrick Jr.

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Jakub Godzik, Michael P. Kelly, Alireza Radmanesh, David Kim, Terrence F. Holekamp, Matthew D. Smyth, Lawrence G. Lenke, Joshua S. Shimony, Tae Sung Park, Jeffrey Leonard, and David D. Limbrick

Object

Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is a developmental abnormality often associated with a spinal syrinx. Patients with syringomyelia are known to have an increased risk of scoliosis, yet the influence of specific radiographically demonstrated features on the prevalence of scoliosis remains unclear. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship of maximum syrinx diameter and tonsillar descent to the presence of scoliosis in patients with CM-I–associated syringomyelia. A secondary objective was to explore the role of craniovertebral junction (CVJ) characteristics as additional risk factors for scoliosis.

Methods

The authors conducted a retrospective review of pediatric patients evaluated for CM-I with syringomyelia at a single institution in the period from 2000 to 2012. Syrinx morphology and CVJ parameters were evaluated with MRI, whereas the presence of scoliosis was determined using standard radiographic criteria. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze radiological features that were independently associated with scoliosis.

Results

Ninety-two patients with CM-I and syringomyelia were identified. The mean age was 10.5 ± 5 years. Thirty-five (38%) of 92 patients had spine deformity; 23 (66%) of these 35 patients were referred primarily for deformity, and 12 (34%) were diagnosed with deformity during workup for other symptoms. Multiple regression analysis revealed maximum syrinx diameter > 6 mm (OR 12.1, 95% CI 3.63–40.57, p < 0.001) and moderate (5–12 mm) rather than severe (> 12 mm) tonsillar herniation (OR 7.64, 95% CI 2.3–25.31, p = 0.001) as significant predictors of spine deformity when controlling for age, sex, and syrinx location.

Conclusions

The current study further elucidates the association between CM-I and spinal deformity by defining specific radiographic characteristics associated with the presence of scoliosis. Specifically, patients presenting with larger maximum syrinx diameters (> 6 mm) have an increased risk of scoliosis.

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Chester K. Yarbrough, Jacob K. Greenberg, Matthew D. Smyth, Jeffrey R. Leonard, Tae Sung Park, and David D. Limbrick Jr.

Object

Historically, assessment of clinical outcomes following surgical management of Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) has been challenging due to the lack of a validated instrument for widespread use. The Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale (CCOS) is a novel system intended to provide a less subjective evaluation of outcomes for patients with CM-I. The goal of this study was to externally validate the performance of the CCOS.

Methods

Patients undergoing surgery for CM-I between 2001 and 2012 were reviewed (n = 292). Inclusion criteria for this study were as follows: 1) patients receiving primary posterior fossa decompression; 2) at least 5.5 months of postoperative clinical follow-up; and 3) patients ≤ 18 years of age at the time of surgery. Outcomes were evaluated using the CCOS, along with a “gestalt” impression of whether patients experienced significant improvement after surgery. A subgroup of 118 consecutive patients undergoing operations between 2008 and 2010 was selected for analysis of interrater reliability (n = 73 meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria). In this subgroup, gestalt and CCOS scores were independently determined by 2 reviewers, and interrater reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa (κ) statistic.

Results

The median CCOS score was 14, and 67% of patients had improved gestalt scores after surgery. Overall, the CCOS was effective at identifying patients with improved outcome after surgery (area under curve = 0.951). The interrater reliability of the CCOS (ICC = 0.71) was high, although the reliability of the component scores ranged from poor to good (ICC 0.23–0.89). The functionality subscore demonstrated a low ICC and did not add to the predictive ability of the logistic regression model (likelihood ratio = 1.8, p = 0.18). When analyzing gestalt outcome, there was moderate agreement between raters (κ = 0.56).

Conclusions

In this external validation study, the CCOS was effective at identifying patients with improved outcomes and proved more reliable than the authors' gestalt impression of outcome. However, certain component subscores (functionality and nonpain symptoms) were found to be less reliable, and may benefit from further definition in score assignment. In particular, the functionality subscore does not add to the predictive ability of the CCOS, and may be unnecessary. Overall, the authors found the CCOS to be an improvement over the previously used assessment of outcome at their institution.

Free access

Abhaya V. Kulkarni, Jay Riva-Cambrin, Samuel R. Browd, James M. Drake, Richard Holubkov, John R. W. Kestle, David D. Limbrick, Curtis J. Rozzelle, Tamara D. Simon, Mandeep S. Tamber, John C. Wellons III, and William E. Whitehead

Object

The use of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) with choroid plexus cauterization (CPC) has been advocated as an alternative to CSF shunting in infants with hydrocephalus. There are limited reports of this procedure in the North American population, however. The authors provide a retrospective review of the experience with combined ETV + CPC within the North American Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN).

Methods

All children (< 2 years old) who underwent an ETV + CPC at one of 7 HCRN centers before November 2012 were included. Data were collected retrospectively through review of hospital records and the HCRN registry. Comparisons were made to a contemporaneous cohort of 758 children who received their first shunt at < 2 years of age within the HCRN.

Results

Thirty-six patients with ETV + CPC were included (13 with previous shunt). The etiologies of hydrocephalus were as follows: intraventricular hemorrhage of prematurity (9 patients), aqueductal stenosis (8), myelomeningocele (4), and other (15). There were no major intraoperative or early postoperative complications. There were 2 postoperative CSF infections. There were 2 deaths unrelated to hydrocephalus and 1 death from seizure. In 18 patients ETV + CPC failed at a median time of 30 days after surgery (range 4–484 days). The actuarial 3-, 6-, and 12-month success for ETV + CPC was 58%, 52%, and 52%. Time to treatment failure was slightly worse for the 36 patients with ETV + CPC compared with the 758 infants treated with shunts (p = 0.012). Near-complete CPC (≥ 90%) was achieved in 11 cases (31%) overall, but in 50% (10 of 20 cases) in 2012 versus 6% (1 of 16 cases) before 2012 (p = 0.009). Failure was higher in children with < 90% CPC (HR 4.39, 95% CI 0.999–19.2, p = 0.0501).

Conclusions

The early North American multicenter experience with ETV + CPC in infants demonstrates that the procedure has reasonable safety in selected cases. The degree of CPC achieved might be associated with a surgeon's learning curve and appears to affect success, suggesting that surgeon training might improve results.