Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 64 items for

  • Refine by Access: all x
  • By Author: Boop, Frederick A. x
Clear All
Restricted access

Danil A. Kozyrev, Jehuda Soleman, Deki Tsering, Robert F. Keating, David S. Hersh, Frederick A. Boop, Pietro Spennato, Giuseppe Cinalli, Gianpiero Tamburrini, Ulrich-Wilhelm Thomale, Robert J. Bollo, Sandip Chatterjee, Harishchandra Lalgudi Srinivasan, Shlomi Constantini, and Jonathan Roth

OBJECTIVE

Widespread use of modern neuroimaging has led to a surge in diagnosing pediatric brain incidentalomas. Thalamic lesions have unique characteristics such as deep location, surgical complexity, and proximity to eloquent neuronal structures. Currently, the natural course of incidental thalamic lesions is unknown. Therefore, the authors present their experience in treating such lesions.

METHODS

A retrospective, international multicenter study was carried out in 8 tertiary pediatric centers from 5 countries. Patients were included if they had an incidental thalamic lesion suspected of being a tumor and were diagnosed before the age of 20 years. Treatment strategy, imaging characteristics, pathology, and the outcome of operated and unoperated cases were analyzed.

RESULTS

Overall, 58 children (23 females and 35 males) with a mean age of 10.8 ± 4.0 years were included. The two most common indications for imaging were nonspecific reasons (n = 19; e.g., research and developmental delay) and headache unrelated to small thalamic lesions (n = 14). Eleven patients (19%) underwent early surgery and 47 were followed, of whom 10 underwent surgery due to radiological changes at a mean of 11.4 ± 9.5 months after diagnosis. Of the 21 patients who underwent surgery, 9 patients underwent resection and 12 underwent biopsy. The two most frequent pathologies were pilocytic astrocytoma and WHO grade II astrocytoma (n = 6 and n = 5, respectively). Three lesions were high-grade gliomas.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study indicate that pediatric incidental thalamic lesions include both low- and high-grade tumors. Close and long-term radiological follow-up is warranted in patients who do not undergo immediate surgery, as tumor progression may occur.

Open access

Savannah K. Gibbs, Stephen Fulton, Basanagoud Mudigoudar, Frederick A. Boop, and Shalini Narayana

BACKGROUND

Presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex in young patients undergoing neurosurgery is critical but presents challenges unique to the pediatric population, including motion artifact, noncompliance, and sedation requirements. Furthermore, as bilingualism in children increases, functional mapping of more than one language is becoming increasingly critical. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive brain stimulation technique, is well suited to evaluate language areas in children since it does not require the patient to remain still during mapping.

OBSERVATIONS

A 13-year-old bilingual male with glioblastoma multiforme involving the left parietal lobe and deep occipital white matter underwent preoperative language mapping using magnetic resonance imaging-guided TMS. Language-specific cortices were successfully identified in both hemispheres. TMS findings aided in discussing with the family the risks of postsurgical deficits of tumor resection; postoperatively, the patient had intact bilingual speech and was referred for chemotherapy and radiation.

LESSONS

The authors’ findings add to the evolving case for preoperative dual language mapping in bilingual neurosurgical candidates. The authors illustrate the feasibility and utility of TMS as a noninvasive functional mapping tool in this child. TMS is safe, effective, and can be used for preoperative mapping of language cortex in bilingual children to aid in surgical planning and discussion with families.

Open access

Frederick A. Boop, Jeffrey N. Bruce, Uğur Türe, and David J. Daniels

Open access

David S. Hersh, Scott Boop, and Frederick A. Boop

The authors describe the unusual case of a 6-year-old boy presenting with decorticate posturing, diminished hearing, and an inability to open his eyes, despite being verbally responsive. He underwent a posterior interhemispheric transcallosal intervenous approach for resection of a pineal region mature teratoma, which recurred 2 years postoperatively. This video demonstrates his initial surgery and reresection, illustrating the value of this approach for more complex lesions that involve the internal cerebral veins (ICVs). At the time of recurrence, microsurgical dissection of the scarred interhemispheric fissure was required to facilitate removal of the multifocal recurrent teratoma, resulting in gross-total resection.

The video can be found here: https://stream.cadmore.media/r10.3171/2021.4.FOCVID2134.

Open access

Marjorie C. Wang, Frederick A. Boop, Douglas Kondziolka, Daniel K. Resnick, Steven N. Kalkanis, Elizabeth Koehnen, Nathan R. Selden, Carl B. Heilman, Alex B. Valadka, Kevin M. Cockroft, John A. Wilson, Richard G. Ellenbogen, Anthony L. Asher, Richard W. Byrne, Paul J. Camarata, Judy Huang, John J. Knightly, Elad I. Levy, Russell R. Lonser, E. Sander Connolly Jr., Fredric B. Meyer, and Linda M. Liau

The American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) was incorporated in 1940 in recognition of the need for detailed training in and special qualifications for the practice of neurological surgery and for self-regulation of quality and safety in the field. The ABNS believes it is the duty of neurosurgeons to place a patient’s welfare and rights above all other considerations and to provide care with compassion, respect for human dignity, honesty, and integrity. At its inception, the ABNS was the 13th member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), which itself was founded in 1933. Today, the ABNS is one of the 24 member boards of the ABMS.

To better serve public health and safety in a rapidly changing healthcare environment, the ABNS continues to evolve in order to elevate standards for the practice of neurological surgery. In connection with its activities, including initial certification, recognition of focused practice, and continuous certification, the ABNS actively seeks and incorporates input from the public and the physicians it serves. The ABNS board certification processes are designed to evaluate both real-life subspecialty neurosurgical practice and overall neurosurgical knowledge, since most neurosurgeons provide call coverage for hospitals and thus must be competent to care for the full spectrum of neurosurgery.

The purpose of this report is to describe the history, current state, and anticipated future direction of ABNS certification in the US.

Open access

Marjorie C. Wang, Frederick A. Boop, Douglas Kondziolka, Daniel K. Resnick, Steven N. Kalkanis, Elizabeth Koehnen, Nathan R. Selden, Carl B. Heilman, Alex B. Valadka, Kevin M. Cockroft, John A. Wilson, Richard G. Ellenbogen, Anthony L. Asher, Richard W. Byrne, Paul J. Camarata, Judy Huang, John J. Knightly, Elad I. Levy, Russell R. Lonser, E. Sander Connolly Jr., Fredric B. Meyer, and Linda M. Liau

The American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) was incorporated in 1940 in recognition of the need for detailed training in and special qualifications for the practice of neurological surgery and for self-regulation of quality and safety in the field. The ABNS believes it is the duty of neurosurgeons to place a patient’s welfare and rights above all other considerations and to provide care with compassion, respect for human dignity, honesty, and integrity. At its inception, the ABNS was the 13th member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), which itself was founded in 1933. Today, the ABNS is one of the 24 member boards of the ABMS.

To better serve public health and safety in a rapidly changing healthcare environment, the ABNS continues to evolve in order to elevate standards for the practice of neurological surgery. In connection with its activities, including initial certification, recognition of focused practice, and continuous certification, the ABNS actively seeks and incorporates input from the public and the physicians it serves. The ABNS board certification processes are designed to evaluate both real-life subspecialty neurosurgical practice and overall neurosurgical knowledge, since most neurosurgeons provide call coverage for hospitals and thus must be competent to care for the full spectrum of neurosurgery.

The purpose of this report is to describe the history, current state, and anticipated future direction of ABNS certification in the US.

Open access

David S. Hersh, Katherine N. Sanford, Kenneth Moore, and Frederick A. Boop

Dorsally exophytic brainstem tumors arise from within the brainstem itself. As the tumor grows, it pulls eloquent tissue with it, resulting in a shape that is analogous to the sides of a volcano. Rather than a resection that is flush with the brainstem being performed, this functional tissue on the lateral edges of the tumor must be identified and preserved in order to avoid postoperative deficits. The authors describe a midline, suboccipital approach with the use of intraoperative direct stimulation to identify and preserve functional tissue innervating the palate during the resection of a dorsally exophytic medullary tumor.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/qbk2DvInO8o.

Open access

David S. Hersh, Katherine N. Sanford, and Frederick A. Boop

Described by Dandy in 1921, the posterior interhemispheric transcallosal approach provides an operative corridor to the pineal region, posterior third ventricle, and upper midbrain. Intervenous-interforniceal and paravenous-interforniceal variants have been utilized for midline and paramidline pathology, respectively. The intervenous-interforniceal variant capitalizes on the natural separation of the internal cerebral veins, which are found medial to the forniceal crura at this level, to provide a safe corridor to the tumor while minimizing the risk of injury to the fornices. Here, the authors describe a posterior interhemispheric transcallosal approach using the intervenous-interforniceal variant for resection of a periaqueductal pilocytic astrocytoma.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/mtQKEXEveTg.

Free access

Frederick A. Boop

Free access

Jack Mullins, Mirza Pojskić, Frederick A. Boop, and Kenan I. Arnautović

OBJECTIVE

Outpatient anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is becoming more common and has been reported to offer advantages over inpatient procedures, including reducing nosocomial infections and costs, as well as improving patient satisfaction. The goal of this retrospective study was to evaluate and compare outcome parameters, complication rates, and costs between inpatient and outpatient ACDF cases performed by 1 surgeon at a single institution.

METHODS

In a retrospective study, the records of all patients who had undergone first-time ACDF performed by a single surgeon in the period from June 1, 2003, to January 31, 2016, were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups: those who had undergone ACDF as outpatients in a same-day surgical center and those who had undergone surgery in the hospital with a minimum 1-night stay. Outcomes for all patients were evaluated with respect to the following parameters: age, sex, length of stay, preoperative and postoperative pain (self-reported questionnaires), number of levels fused, fusion, and complications, as well as the presence of risk factors, such as an increased body mass index, smoking, and diabetes mellitus.

RESULTS

In total, 1123 patients were operated on, 485 (43%) men and 638 (57%) women, whose mean age was 50 years. The mean follow-up time was 25 months. Overall, 40.5% underwent 1-level surgery, 34.3% 2-level, 21.9% 3-level, and 3.2% 4-level. Only 5 patients had nonunion of vertebrae; thus, the fusion rate was 99.6%. Complications occurred in 40 patients (3.6%), with 9 having significant complications (0.8%). Five hundred sixty patients (49.9%) had same-day surgery, and 563 patients (50.1%) stayed overnight in the hospital. The inpatients were older, were more commonly male, and had a higher rate of diabetes. Smoking status did not influence the length of stay. Both groups had a statistically significant reduction in pain (expressed as a visual analog scale score) postoperatively with no significant difference between the groups. One- and 2-level surgeries were done significantly more often in the outpatient setting (p < 0.001).

The complication rate was 4.1% in the outpatient group and 3.0% in the inpatient group; there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups (p = 0.339). Significantly more complications occurred with 3- and 4-level surgeries than with 1- and 2-level procedures (p < 0.001, chi-square test). The overall average inpatient cost for commercial insurance carriers was 26% higher than those for outpatient surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is safe for patients undergoing 1- or 2-level surgery, with a very significant rate of pain reduction and fusion and a low complication rate in both clinical settings. Outpatient and inpatient groups undergoing 3- or 4-level surgery had an increased risk of complications (compared with those undergoing 1- or 2-level surgery), with a negligible difference between the 2 groups. This finding suggests that these procedures can also be included as standard outpatient surgery. Comparable outcome parameters and the same complication rates between inpatient and outpatient groups support both operative environments.