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Xiaochun Zhao, Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Mohamed A. Labib, Sirin Gandhi, Evgenii Belykh, Komal Naeem, Mark C. Preul, Peter Nakaji, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

Aneurysms that arise on the medial surface of the paraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are surgically challenging. The contralateral interoptic trajectory, which uses the space between the optic nerves, can partially expose the medial surface of the paraclinoid ICA. In this study, the authors quantitatively measure the area of the medial ICA accessible through the interoptic triangle and propose a potential patient-selection algorithm that is based on preoperative measurements on angiographic imaging.

METHODS

The contralateral interoptic trajectory was studied on 10 sides of 5 cadaveric heads, through which the medial paraclinoid ICA was identified. The falciform ligament medial to the contralateral optic canal was incised, the contralateral optic nerve was gently elevated, and the medial surface of the paraclinoid ICA was inspected via different viewing angles to obtain maximal exposure. The accessible area on the carotid artery was outlined. The distance from the distal dural ring (DDR) to the proximal and distal borders of this accessible area was measured. The superior and inferior borders were measured using the clockface method relative to a vertical line on the coronal plane. To validate these parameters, preoperative measurements and intraoperative findings were reviewed in 8 clinical cases.

RESULTS

In the sagittal plane, the mean (SD) distances from the DDR to the proximal and distal ends of the accessible area on the paraclinoid ICA were 2.5 (1.52) mm and 8.4 (2.32) mm, respectively. In the coronal plane, the mean (SD) angles of the superior and inferior ends of the accessible area relative to a vertical line were 21.7° (14.84°) and 130.9° (12.75°), respectively. Six (75%) of 8 clinical cases were consistent with the proposed patient-selection algorithm.

CONCLUSIONS

The contralateral interoptic approach is a feasible route to access aneurysms that arise from the medial paraclinoid ICA. An aneurysm can be safely clipped via the contralateral interoptic trajectory if 1) both proximal and distal borders of the aneurysm neck are 2.5–8.4 mm distal to the DDR, and 2) at least one border of the aneurysm neck on the coronal clockface is 21.7°–130.9° medial to the vertical line.

Free access

Mohamed A. Labib, Evgenii Belykh, Claudio Cavallo, Xiaochun Zhao, Daniel M. Prevedello, Ricardo L. Carrau, Andrew S. Little, Mauro A. T. Ferreira, Mark C. Preul, A. Samy Youssef, and Peter Nakaji

OBJECTIVE

The ventral jugular foramen and the infrapetrous region are difficult to access through conventional lateral and posterolateral approaches. Endoscopic endonasal approaches to this region are obstructed by the eustachian tube (ET). This study presents a novel strategy for mobilizing the ET while preserving its integrity. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons with previous ET management paradigms are also presented.

METHODS

Ten dry skulls were analyzed. Four ET management strategies were sequentially performed on a total of 6 sides of cadaveric head specimens. Four measurement groups were generated: in group A, the ET was intact and not mobilized; in group B, the ET was mobilized inferolaterally; in group C, the ET underwent anterolateral mobilization; and in group D, the ET was resected. ET range of mobilization, surgical exposure area, and surgical freedom were measured and compared among the groups.

RESULTS

Wide exposure of the infrapetrous region and jugular foramen was achieved by removing the pterygoid process, unroofing the cartilaginous ET up to the level of the posterior aspect of the foramen ovale, and detaching the ET from the skull base and soft palate. Anterolateral mobilization of the ET facilitated significantly more retraction (a 126% increase) of the ET than inferolateral mobilization (mean ± SD: 20.8 ± 11.2 mm vs 9.2 ± 3.6 mm [p = 0.02]). Compared with group A, groups C and D had enhanced surgical exposure (142.5% [1176.9 ± 935.7 mm2] and 155.9% [1242.0 ± 1096.2 mm2], respectively, vs 485.4 ± 377.6 mm2 for group A [both p = 0.02]). Furthermore, group C had a significantly larger surgical exposure area than group B (p = 0.02). No statistically significant difference was found between the area of exposure obtained by ET removal and anterolateral mobilization. Anterolateral mobilization of the ET resulted in a 39.5% increase in surgical freedom toward the exocranial jugular foramen compared with that obtained through inferolateral mobilization of the ET (67.2° ± 20.5° vs 48.1° ± 6.7° [p = 0.047]) and a 65.4% increase compared with that afforded by an intact ET position (67.2° ± 20.5° vs 40.6° ± 14.3° [p = 0.03]).

CONCLUSIONS

Anterolateral mobilization of the ET provides excellent access to the ventral jugular foramen and infrapetrous region. The surgical exposure obtained is superior to that achieved with other ET management strategies and is comparable to that obtained by ET resection.

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Mohamed A. Labib, Leandro Borba Moreira, Xiaochun Zhao, Sirin Gandhi, Claudio Cavallo, Ali Tayebi Meybodi, A. Samy Youssef, Andrew S. Little, Peter Nakaji, Mark C. Preul, and Michael T. Lawton

OBJECTIVE

The pretemporal transcavernous approach (PTA) and the endoscopic endonasal transcavernous approach (EETA) are both used to access the retroclival region. A direct quantitative comparison of both approaches has not been made. The authors compared the technical nuances of, and surgical exposure afforded by, each approach and identified the key elements of the approach selection process.

METHODS

Fourteen cadaveric specimens underwent either PTA (group A) or EETA with unilateral (group B) followed by bilateral (group C) interdural pituitary gland transposition. The percentage of drilled clivus; length of exposed oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve [CN] III), posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and superior cerebellar artery (SCA); and surgical area of exposure of both cerebral peduncles and the pons for the 3 groups were measured and compared.

RESULTS

Group A had a significantly lower percentage of drilled area than group B (mean [SD], 35.6% [11.2%] vs 91.3% [4.9%], p < 0.01). In group C, 100% of the upper third of the clivus was drilled in all specimens. Significantly longer segments of the ipsilateral PCA (p < 0.01) and SCA (p < 0.01) were exposed in group A than in group B. There was no significant difference in the length of the ipsilateral CN III exposed among the 3 groups. There was also no significant difference between group A and either group B or group C for the contralateral CN III or PCA exposure. However, longer segments of the contralateral SCA were exposed in group C than in group A (p = 0.02). Furthermore, longer segments of CN III (p < 0.01), PCA (p < 0.01), and SCA (p < 0.01) were exposed in group C than in group B. For brainstem exposure, there was greater exposure of the pons in group C than in group A (mean [SD], 211.4 [19.5] mm2 vs 157.7 [25.3] mm2, p < 0.01) and group B (211.4 [19.5] mm2 vs 153.9 [34.1] mm2, p < 0.01). However, significantly greater exposure of the ipsilateral peduncle was observed in group A (mean [SD], 125.6 [43.1] mm2) than in groups B and C (56.3 [6.0] mm2, p < 0.01). Group C had significantly greater exposure of the contralateral peduncle than group B (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the first to quantitatively identify the advantages and limitations of the PTA and EETA from an anatomical perspective. Understanding these data may help the skull base surgeon design a maximally effective yet minimally invasive approach to individual lesions.

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Qing Sun, Xiaochun Zhao, Sirin Gandhi, Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Evgenii Belykh, Daniel Valli, Claudio Cavallo, Leandro Borba Moreira, Peter Nakaji, Michael T. Lawton, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

The cisternal pulvinar is a challenging location for neurosurgery. Four approaches for reaching the pulvinar without cortical transgression are the ipsilateral supracerebellar infratentorial (iSCIT), contralateral supracerebellar infratentorial (cSCIT), ipsilateral occipital transtentorial (iOCTT), and contralateral occipital transtentorial/falcine (cOCTF) approaches. This study quantitatively compared these approaches in terms of surgical exposure and maneuverability.

METHODS

Each of the 4 approaches was performed in 4 cadaveric heads (8 specimens in total). A 6-sided anatomical polygonal region was configured over the cisternal pulvinar, defined by 6 reachable anatomical points in different vectors. Multiple polygons were subsequently formed to calculate the areas of exposure. The surgical freedom of each approach was calculated as the maximum allowable working area at the proximal end of a probe, with the distal end fixed at the posterior pole of the pulvinar. Areas of exposure, surgical freedom, and the working distance (surgical depth) of all approaches were compared.

RESULTS

No significant difference was found among the 4 different approaches with regard to the surgical depth, surgical freedom, or medial exposure area of the pulvinar. In the pairwise comparison, the cSCIT approach provided a significantly larger lateral exposure (39 ± 9.8 mm2) than iSCIT (19 ± 10.3 mm2, p < 0.01), iOCTT (19 ± 8.2 mm2, p < 0.01), and cOCTF (28 ± 7.3 mm2, p = 0.02) approaches. The total exposure area with a cSCIT approach (75 ± 23.1 mm2) was significantly larger than with iOCTT (43 ± 16.4 mm2, p < 0.01) and iSCIT (40 ± 20.2 mm2, p = 0.01) approaches (pairwise, p ≤ 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

The cSCIT approach is preferable among the 4 compared approaches, demonstrating better exposure to the cisternal pulvinar than ipsilateral approaches and a larger lateral exposure than the cOCTF approach. Both contralateral approaches described (cSCIT and cOCTF) provided enhanced lateral exposure to the pulvinar, while the cOCTF provided a larger exposure to the lateral portion of the pulvinar than the iOCTT. Medial exposure and maneuverability did not differ among the approaches. A short tentorium may negatively impact an ipsilateral approach because the cingulate isthmus and parahippocampal gyrus tend to protrude, in which case they can obstruct access to the cisternal pulvinar ipsilaterally.

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Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Michael T. Lawton, Leandro Borba Moreira, Xiaochun Zhao, Michael J. Lang, Peter Nakaji, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

Harvesting the occipital artery (OA) is challenging. The subcutaneous OA is usually found near the superior nuchal line and followed proximally, requiring a large incision and risking damage to the superficially located OA. The authors assessed the anatomical feasibility and safety of exposing the OA through a retromastoid-transmuscular approach.

METHODS

Using 10 cadaveric heads, 20 OAs were harvested though a 5-cm retroauricular incision placed 5 cm posterior to the external auditory meatus. The underlying muscle layers were sequentially cut and recorded before exposing the OA. Changes in the orientation of muscle fibers were used as a roadmap to expose the OA without damaging it.

RESULTS

The suboccipital segment of the OA was exposed without damage after incising two consecutive layers of muscles and their investing fasciae. These muscles displayed different fiber directions: the superficially located sternocleidomastoid muscle with vertically oriented fibers, and the underlying splenius capitis with anteroposteriorly (and mediolaterally) oriented fibers. The OA could be harvested along the entire length of the skin incision in all specimens. If needed, the incision can be extended proximally and/or distally to follow the OA and harvest greater lengths.

CONCLUSIONS

This transmuscular technique for identification of the OA is a reliable method and may facilitate exposure and protection of the OA during a retrosigmoid approach. This technique may obviate the need for larger incisions when planning a bypass to nearby arteries in the posterior circulation via a retrosigmoid craniotomy. Additionally, the small skin incision can be enlarged when a different craniotomy and/or bypass is planned or when a greater length of the OA is needed to be harvested.

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Robert Lynagh, Mark Ishak, Joseph Georges, Danielle Lopez, Hany Osman, Michael Kakareka, Brandon Boyer, H. Warren Goldman, Jennifer Eschbacher, Mark C. Preul, Peter Nakaji, Alan Turtz, Steven Yocom, and Denah Appelt

OBJECTIVE

Accurate histopathological diagnoses are often necessary for treating neuro-oncology patients. However, stereotactic biopsy (STB), a common method for obtaining suspicious tissue from deep or eloquent brain regions, fails to yield diagnostic tissue in some cases. Failure to obtain diagnostic tissue can delay initiation of treatment and may result in further invasive procedures for patients. In this study, the authors sought to determine if the coupling of in vivo optical imaging with an STB system is an effective method for identification of diagnostic tissue at the time of biopsy.

METHODS

A minimally invasive fiber optic imaging system was developed by coupling a 0.65-mm-diameter coherent fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope to an STB system. Human U251 glioma cells were transduced for stable expression of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) to produce U251-BFP cells that were utilized for in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, blue fluorescence was confirmed, and tumor cell delineation by fluorescein sodium (FNa) was quantified with fluorescence microscopy. In vivo, transgenic athymic rats implanted with U251-BFP cells (n = 4) were utilized for experiments. Five weeks postimplantation, the rats received 5–10 mg/kg intravenous FNa and underwent craniotomies overlying the tumor implantation site and contralateral normal brain. A clinical STB needle containing our 0.65-mm imaging fiber was passed through each craniotomy and images were collected. Fluorescence images from regions of interest ipsilateral and contralateral to tumor implantation were obtained and quantified.

RESULTS

Live-cell fluorescence imaging confirmed blue fluorescence from transduced tumor cells and revealed a strong correlation between tumor cells quantified by blue fluorescence and FNa contrast (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.001). Normalized to background, in vivo FNa-mediated fluorescence intensity was significantly greater from tumor regions, verified by blue fluorescence, compared to contralateral brain in all animals (301.7 ± 34.18 relative fluorescence units, p < 0.001). Fluorescence intensity measured from the tumor margin was not significantly greater than that from normal brain (p = 0.89). Biopsies obtained from regions of strong fluorescein contrast were histologically consistent with tumor.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors found that in vivo fluorescence imaging with an STB needle containing a submillimeter-diameter fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope provided direct visualization of neoplastic tissue in an animal brain tumor model prior to biopsy. These results were confirmed in vivo with positive control cells and by post hoc histological assessment. In vivo fluorescence guidance may improve the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies.

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Robert Lynagh, Mark Ishak, Joseph Georges, Danielle Lopez, Hany Osman, Michael Kakareka, Brandon Boyer, H. Warren Goldman, Jennifer Eschbacher, Mark C. Preul, Peter Nakaji, Alan Turtz, Steven Yocom, and Denah Appelt

OBJECTIVE

Accurate histopathological diagnoses are often necessary for treating neuro-oncology patients. However, stereotactic biopsy (STB), a common method for obtaining suspicious tissue from deep or eloquent brain regions, fails to yield diagnostic tissue in some cases. Failure to obtain diagnostic tissue can delay initiation of treatment and may result in further invasive procedures for patients. In this study, the authors sought to determine if the coupling of in vivo optical imaging with an STB system is an effective method for identification of diagnostic tissue at the time of biopsy.

METHODS

A minimally invasive fiber optic imaging system was developed by coupling a 0.65-mm-diameter coherent fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope to an STB system. Human U251 glioma cells were transduced for stable expression of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) to produce U251-BFP cells that were utilized for in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro, blue fluorescence was confirmed, and tumor cell delineation by fluorescein sodium (FNa) was quantified with fluorescence microscopy. In vivo, transgenic athymic rats implanted with U251-BFP cells (n = 4) were utilized for experiments. Five weeks postimplantation, the rats received 5–10 mg/kg intravenous FNa and underwent craniotomies overlying the tumor implantation site and contralateral normal brain. A clinical STB needle containing our 0.65-mm imaging fiber was passed through each craniotomy and images were collected. Fluorescence images from regions of interest ipsilateral and contralateral to tumor implantation were obtained and quantified.

RESULTS

Live-cell fluorescence imaging confirmed blue fluorescence from transduced tumor cells and revealed a strong correlation between tumor cells quantified by blue fluorescence and FNa contrast (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.001). Normalized to background, in vivo FNa-mediated fluorescence intensity was significantly greater from tumor regions, verified by blue fluorescence, compared to contralateral brain in all animals (301.7 ± 34.18 relative fluorescence units, p < 0.001). Fluorescence intensity measured from the tumor margin was not significantly greater than that from normal brain (p = 0.89). Biopsies obtained from regions of strong fluorescein contrast were histologically consistent with tumor.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors found that in vivo fluorescence imaging with an STB needle containing a submillimeter-diameter fiber optic fluorescence microendoscope provided direct visualization of neoplastic tissue in an animal brain tumor model prior to biopsy. These results were confirmed in vivo with positive control cells and by post hoc histological assessment. In vivo fluorescence guidance may improve the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies.

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Michael A. Mooney, Joseph Georges, Mohammedhassan Izady Yazdanabadi, Katherine Y. Goehring, William L. White, Andrew S. Little, Mark C. Preul, Stephen W. Coons, Peter Nakaji, and Jennifer M. Eschbacher

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) ex vivo to differentiate adenoma from normal pituitary gland in surgical biopsy specimens. CRM allows for rapid, label-free evaluation of biopsy specimens with cellular resolution while avoiding some limitations of frozen section analysis.

METHODS

Biopsy specimens from 11 patients with suspected pituitary adenomas were transported directly to the pathology department. Samples were immediately positioned and visualized with CRM using a confocal microscope located in the same area of the pathology department where frozen sections are prepared. An H & E–stained slide was subsequently prepared from imaged tissue. A neuropathologist compared the histopathological characteristics of the H & E–stained slide and the matched CRM images. A second neuropathologist reviewed images in a blinded fashion and assigned diagnoses of adenoma or normal gland.

RESULTS

For all specimens, CRM contrasted cellularity, tissue architecture, nuclear pleomorphism, vascularity, and stroma. Pituitary adenomas demonstrated sheets and large lobules of cells, similar to the matched H & E–stained slides. CRM images of normal tissue showed scattered small lobules of pituitary epithelial cells, consistent with matched H & E–stained images of normal gland. Blinded review by a neuropathologist confirmed the diagnosis in 15 (94%) of 16 images of adenoma versus normal gland.

CONCLUSIONS

CRM is a simple, reliable approach for rapidly evaluating pituitary adenoma specimens ex vivo. This technique can be used to accurately differentiate between pituitary adenoma and normal gland while preserving biopsy tissue for future permanent analysis, immunohistochemical studies, and molecular studies.

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Evgenii Belykh, Kaan Yağmurlu, Ting Lei, Sam Safavi-Abbasi, Mark E. Oppenlander, Nikolay L. Martirosyan, Vadim A. Byvaltsev, Robert F. Spetzler, Peter Nakaji, and Mark C. Preul

OBJECTIVE

The best approach to deep-seated lateral and third ventricle lesions is a function of lesion characteristics, location, and relationship to the ventricles. The authors sought to examine and compare angles of attack and surgical freedom of anterior ipsilateral and contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approaches to the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle using human cadaveric head dissections. Illustrative clinical experiences with a contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach and an anterior interhemispheric transcallosal transchoroidal approach are also related.

METHODS

Five formalin-fixed human cadaveric heads (10 sides) were examined microsurgically. CT and MRI scans obtained before dissection were uploaded and fused into the navigation system. The authors performed contralateral and ipsilateral transcallosal approaches to the lateral ventricle. Using the navigation system, they measured areas of exposure, surgical freedom, angles of attack, and angle of view to the surgical surface. Two clinical cases are described.

RESULTS

The exposed areas of the ipsilateral (mean [± SD] 313.8 ± 85.0 mm2) and contralateral (344 ± 87.73 mm2) interhemispheric approaches were not significantly different (p = 0.12). Surgical freedom and vertical angles of attack were significantly larger for the contralateral approach to the most midsuperior reachable point (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively) and to the posterosuperior (p = 0.02 and p = 0.04) and central (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02) regions of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Surgical freedom and vertical angles of attack to central and anterior points on the floor of the lateral ventricle did not differ significantly with approach. The angle to the surface of the caudate head region was less steep for the contralateral (135.6° ± 15.6°) than for the ipsilateral (152.0° ± 13.6°) approach (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

The anterior contralateral interhemispheric transcallosal approach provided a more expansive exposure to the lower two-thirds of the lateral ventricle and striothalamocapsular region. In normal-sized ventricles, the foramen of Monro and the choroidal fissure were better visualized through the lateral ventricle ipsilateral to the craniotomy than through the contralateral approach.

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Ali M. Elhadi, Hasan A. Zaidi, Kaan Yagmurlu, Shah Ahmed, Albert L. Rhoton Jr., Peter Nakaji, Mark C. Preul, and Andrew S. Little

OBJECTIVE

Endoscopic transmaxillary approaches (ETMAs) address pathology of the anterolateral skull base, including the cavernous sinus, pterygopalatine fossa, and infratemporal fossa. This anatomically complex region contains branches of the trigeminal nerve and external carotid artery and is in proximity to the internal carotid artery. The authors postulated, on the basis of intraoperative observations, that the infraorbital nerve (ION) is a useful surgical landmark for navigating this region; therefore, they studied the anatomy of the ION and its relationships to critical neurovascular structures and the maxillary nerve (V2) encountered in ETMAs.

METHODS

Endoscopic anatomical dissections were performed bilaterally in 5 silicone-injected, formalin-fixed cadaveric heads (10 sides). Endonasal transmaxillary and direct transmaxillary (Caldwell-Luc) approaches were performed, and anatomical correlations were analyzed and documented. Stereotactic imaging of each specimen was performed to correlate landmarks and enable precise measurement of each segment.

RESULTS

The ION was readily identified in the roof of the maxillary sinus at the beginning of the surgical procedure in all specimens. Anatomical dissections of the ION and the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve (V2) to the cavernous sinus suggested that the ION/V2 complex has 4 distinct segments that may have implications in endoscopic approaches: 1) Segment I, the cutaneous segment of the ION and its terminal branches (5–11 branches) to the face, distal to the infraorbital foramen; 2) Segment II, the orbitomaxillary segment of the ION within the infraorbital canal from the infraorbital foramen along the infraorbital groove (length 12 ± 3.2 mm); 3) Segment III, the pterygopalatine segment within the pterygopalatine fossa, which starts at the infraorbital groove to the foramen rotundum (13 ± 2.5 mm); and 4) Segment IV, the cavernous segment from the foramen rotundum to the trigeminal ganglion (15 ± 4.1 mm), which passes in the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. The relationship of the ION/V2 complex to the contents of the cavernous sinus, carotid artery, and pterygopalatine fossa is described in the text.

CONCLUSIONS

The ION/V2 complex is an easily identifiable and potentially useful surgical landmark to the foramen rotundum, cavernous sinus, carotid artery, pterygopalatine fossa, and anterolateral skull base during ETMAs.