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Cheng-Chia Lee, Jason P. Sheehan, Hideyuki Kano, Berkcan Akpinar, Roberto Martinez-Alvarez, Nuria Martinez-Moreno, Wan-Yuo Guo, L. Dade Lunsford, and Kang-Du Liu

OBJECTIVE

Cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSHs) are rare vascular tumors. A direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage and incomplete tumor resection. Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a therapeutic alternative to microsurgery, outcome studies are few. Authors of the present study evaluated the role of SRS for CSH.

METHODS

An international multicenter study was conducted to review outcome data in 31 patients with CSH. Eleven patients had initial microsurgery before SRS, and the other 20 patients (64.5%) underwent Gamma Knife SRS as the primary management for their CSH. Median age at the time of radiosurgery was 47 years, and 77.4% of patients had cranial nerve dysfunction before SRS. Patients received a median tumor margin dose of 12.6 Gy (range 12–19 Gy) at a median isodose of 55%.

RESULTS

Tumor regression was confirmed by imaging in all 31 patients, and all patients had greater than 50% reduction in tumor volume at 6 months post-SRS. No patient had delayed tumor growth, new cranial neuropathy, visual function deterioration, adverse radiation effects, or hypopituitarism after SRS. Twenty-four patients had presented with cranial nerve disorders before SRS, and 6 (25%) of them had gradual improvement. Four (66.7%) of the 6 patients with orbital symptoms had symptomatic relief at the last follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery was effective in reducing the volume of CSH and attaining long-term tumor control in all patients at a median of 40 months. The authors' experience suggests that SRS is a reasonable primary and adjuvant treatment modality for patients in whom a CSH is diagnosed.

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Seyed H. Mousavi, Ajay Niranjan, Berkcan Akpinar, Edward A. Monaco III, Jonathan Cohen, Jagdish Bhatnagar, Yue-Fang Chang, Hideyuki Kano, Sakibul Huq, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

During the last 25 years, more than 100,000 patients worldwide with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) have undergone stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with a standard dose of radiation. However, the radiobiological effect of radiation is determined by the amount of energy delivered to the tissue (integral dose [ID] = mean dose × target volume) and is directly associated with the nerve volume. Although the trigeminal nerve volume varies among patients with TN, the clinical impact of this variation in delivered energy is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of delivered ID on the outcome of TN radiosurgery.

METHODS

The authors evaluated 155 patients with unilateral TN who had undergone SRS as their initial surgical management over a 13-year period. The authors measured the postganglionic ID within the SRS target and retrospectively stratified patients into 3 groups: low (< 1.4 mJ), medium (1.4–2.7 mJ), and high (> 2.7 mJ) ID. Clinical outcomes, which included pain status (scored using the Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Scale) and sensory dysfunction (scored using the Barrow Neurological Institute Numbness Scale), were evaluated at a median follow-up of 71 months.

RESULTS

Patients who were treated with a medium ID had superior pain relief either with or without medications (p = 0.006). In the medium ID group, the rates of complete pain relief without medications at 1, 3, and 6 years after SRS were 67%, 54%, and 33%, respectively, while the rates in the rest of the cohort were 55%, 36%, and 19%, respectively. Patients given a high ID had a higher rate of post-SRS trigeminal sensory deterioration (p < 0.0001). At 1, 3, and 6 years after SRS, the high ID group had an estimated rate for developing sensory dysfunction of 35%, 45%, and 50%, respectively, while the rates in patients receiving low and medium IDs were 3%, 4%, and 9%, respectively. The optimal clinical outcome (maximum pain relief and minimal trigeminal sensory dysfunction) was obtained in patients who had received a medium ID.

CONCLUSIONS

With current dose selection methods, nerve volume affects long-term clinical outcomes in patients with TN who have undergone SRS. This study suggests that the prescribed SRS dose should be customized for each TN patient based on the nerve volume.

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Seyed H. Mousavi, Ajay Niranjan, Berkcan Akpinar, Marshall Huang, Hideyuki Kano, Daniel Tonetti, John C. Flickinger, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECTIVE

In the era of MRI, vestibular schwannomas are often recognized when patients still have excellent hearing. Besides success in tumor control rate, hearing preservation is a main goal in any procedure for management of this population. The authors evaluated whether modified auditory subclassification prior to radiosurgery could predict long-term hearing outcome in this population.

METHODS

The authors reviewed a quality assessment registry that included the records of 1134 vestibular schwannoma patients who had undergone stereotactic radiosurgery during a 15-year period (1997–2011). The authors identified 166 patients who had Gardner-Robertson Class I hearing prior to stereotactic radiosurgery. Fifty-three patients were classified as having Class I-A (no subjective hearing loss) and 113 patients as Class I-B (subjective hearing loss). Class I-B patients were further stratified into Class I-B1 (pure tone average ≤ 10 dB in comparison with the contralateral ear; 56 patients), and I-B2 (> 10 dB compared with the normal ear; 57 patients). At a median follow-up of 65 months, the authors evaluated patients' hearing outcomes and tumor control.

RESULTS

The median pure tone average elevations after stereotactic radiosurgery were 5 dB, 13.5 dB, and 28 dB in Classes I-A, I-B1, and I-B2, respectively. The median declines in speech discrimination scores after stereotactic radiosurgery were 0% for Class I-A (p = 0.33), 8% for Class I-B1 (p < 0.0001), and 40% for Class I-B2 (p < 0.0001). Serviceable hearing preservation rates were 98%, 73%, and 33% for Classes I-A, I-B1, and I-B2, respectively. Gardner-Robertson Class I hearing was preserved in 87%, 43%, and 5% of patients in Classes I-A, I-B1, and I-B2, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term hearing preservation was significantly better if radiosurgery was performed prior to subjective hearing loss. In patients with subjective hearing loss, the difference in pure tone average between the affected ear and the unaffected ear was an important factor in long-term hearing preservation.

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Jason P. Sheehan, Hideyuki Kano, Zhiyuan Xu, Veronica Chiang, David Mathieu, Samuel Chao, Berkcan Akpinar, John Y.K. Lee, James B. Yu, Judith Hess, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Wen-Yuh Chung, John Pierce, Symeon Missios, Douglas Kondziolka, Michelle Alonso-Basanta, Gene H. Barnett, and L. Dade Lunsford

OBJECT

Facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) are rare intracranial tumors, and the optimal management of these tumors remains unclear. Resection can be undertaken, but the tumor’s intimate association with the facial nerve makes resection with neurological preservation quite challenging. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been used to treat FNSs, and this study evaluates the outcome of this approach.

METHODS

At 8 medical centers participating in the North American Gamma Knife Consortium (NAGKC), 42 patients undergoing SRS for an FNS were identified, and clinical and radiographic data were obtained for these cases. Males outnumbered females at a ratio of 1.2:1, and the patients’ median age was 48 years (range 11–76 years). Prior resection was performed in 36% of cases. The mean tumor volume was 1.8 cm3, and a mean margin dose of 12.5 Gy (range 11–15 Gy) was delivered to the tumor.

RESULTS

At a median follow-up of 28 months, tumor control was achieved in 36 (90%) of the 40 patients with reliable radiographic follow-up. Actuarial tumor control was 97%, 97%, 97%, and 90% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years postradiosurgery. Preoperative facial nerve function was preserved in 38 of 42 patients, with 60% of evaluable patients having House-Brackmann scores of 1 or 2 at last follow-up. Treated patients with a House-Brackmann score of 1 to 3 were more likely to demonstrate this level of facial nerve function at last evaluation (OR 6.09, 95% CI 1.7–22.0, p = 0.006). Avoidance of temporary or permanent neurological symptoms was more likely to be achieved in patients who received a tumor margin dose of 12.5 Gy or less (log-rank test, p = 0.024) delivered to a tumor of ≤ 1 cm3 in volume (log-rank test, p = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Stereotactic radiosurgery resulted in tumor control and neurological preservation in most FNS patients. When the tumor is smaller and the patient exhibits favorable normal facial nerve function, SRS portends a better result. The authors believe that early, upfront SRS may be the treatment of choice for small FNSs, but it is an effective salvage treatment for residual/recurrent tumor that remain or progress after resection.