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Marie-Laure Cuny, Laurence Vaivre-Douret, Hélène Piana, Thomas Blauwblomme, Kévin Beccaria, Giovanna Paternoster, Marie Bourgeois, Syril James, Michel Zerah, Julie Prodhomme, Eglantine Esnault, Mathilde Cozzo, Clémence Trousson, Béatrice Navarro, Sarah Stricker, Nathalie Boddaert, Christian Sainte-Rose, Pascale Piolino, and Stephanie Puget

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine the cognitive profile of children with a temporal arachnoid cyst (TAC) and its impact on daily life.

METHODS

The authors prospectively analyzed the cognitive and psychological profiles of 100 consecutive children relative to age and cyst characteristics (side, cyst size, and cyst shape: convex or nonconvex) and their outcome 4 years later.

RESULTS

Mean IQs were normal but with high heterogeneity on Full Scale IQ (FSIQ; range 59–150); 29% of children had at least one Wechsler index below the norm, in particular, Processing Speed and Working Memory Indexes. Impairments were observed in language for 31% of children, as well as in verbal memory (28%), visual memory (23%), executive function (21%), and visual attention (24%). Half of the children (50%) needed rehabilitation for learning difficulties, and 26% had academic difficulties. The parental questionnaire BRIEF (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function) revealed significant executive dysfunctions in daily life for 22% of the children. One-third of the patients (34%) required psychotherapy for anxiety or social disorders, with higher rates in patients with a right-sided cyst and older children. Cyst size had very little neuropsychological impact. Convex cysts were significantly associated with worse performance than nonconvex cysts on all Wechsler indexes and FSIQ, and in language, verbal memory, attention, and visuospatial skills. Children with a convex cyst had significantly more executive and behavior difficulties in daily life and more psychotherapy than other children. The effect of cyst shape was independent of Galassi type and cyst side. Children with a ruptured cyst or an incidentally discovered cyst usually had a good cognitive level. Four years later, children without initial disorders remained stable, whereas those with difficulties who did not undergo surgery needed more rehabilitation and school adaptations.

CONCLUSIONS

This large cohort study revealed a varied profile of children with a TAC: at initial assessment, 50% had neuropsychological difficulties and needed rehabilitation and/or psychotherapy for learning or behavior difficulties, and 50% had no difficulties, which may explain the debate about this pathology. Patients with neuropsychological difficulties had a heterogeneous profile with normal intelligence but selective cognitive and/or behavior disorders that may have a long-term impact on their quality of life, particularly those with a right-sided cyst. A neuropsychological evaluation is not always necessary for a cyst discovered incidentally, but early evaluation is essential in patients with academic, learning, or psychological disorders. When assessment shows selective disorders presumably linked to cyst location, surgery may be considered, particularly for convex cysts, as this study revealed more effects in association with cyst shape than with cyst size and significantly poorer performance with a convex cyst.

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Sarah Stricker, Grégoire Boulouis, Sandro Benichi, Marie Bourgeois, Florent Gariel, Lorenzo Garzelli, Jean-François Hak, Quentin Alias, Basile Kerleroux, Kevin Beccaria, Anaïs Chivet, Timothée de Saint Denis, Syril James, Giovanna Paternoster, Michel Zerah, Manoelle Kossorotoff, Nathalie Boddaert, Francis Brunelle, Philippe Meyer, Stéphanie Puget, Olivier Naggara, and Thomas Blauwblomme

OBJECTIVE

Rupture of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is the main etiology of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in children. Ensuing intracranial hypertension is among the modifiable prognosis factors and sometimes requires emergency hemorrhage evacuation (HE). The authors aimed to analyze variables associated with HE in children with ruptured AVM.

METHODS

This study was a single-center retrospective analysis of children treated for ruptured AVM. The authors evaluated the occurrence of HE, its association with other acute surgical procedures (e.g., nidal excision, decompressive hemicraniectomy), and clinical outcome. Variables associated with each intervention were analyzed using univariable and multivariable models. Clinical outcome was assessed at 18 months using the ordinal King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury.

RESULTS

A total of 104 patients were treated for 112 episodes of ruptured AVM between 2002 and 2018. In the 51 children (45.5% of cases) who underwent HE, 37 procedures were performed early (i.e., within 24 hours after initial cerebral imaging) and 14 late. Determinants of HE were a lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale score (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.83, 95% CI 0.71–0.97 per point increase); higher ICH/brain volume ratio (aOR 18.6, 95% CI 13–26.5 per percent increase); superficial AVM location; and the presence of a brain herniation (aOR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3–10.4). Concurrent nidal surgery was acutely performed in 69% of Spetzler-Martin grade I–II ruptured AVMs and in 25% of Spetzler-Martin grade III lesions. Factors associated with nidal surgery were superficial AVMs, late HE, and absent alteration of consciousness at presentation. Only 8 cases required additional surgery due to intracranial hypertension. At 18 months, overall mortality was less than 4%, 58% of patients had a favorable outcome regardless of surgical intervention, and 87% were functioning independently.

CONCLUSIONS

HE is a lifesaving procedure performed in approximately half of the children who suffer AVM rupture. The good overall outcome justifies intensive initial management.

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Lelio Guida, Kevin Beccaria, Sandro Benichi, Anaïs Chivet, Timothée de Saint Denis, Syril James, Giovanna Paternoster, Michel Zerah, Stéphanie Puget, and Thomas Blauwblomme

OBJECTIVE

Pediatric patients with long-term shunts may experience specific complications related to the segregation of the supra- and infratentorial spaces along with different pressure regimens, leading to either mesencephalic syndromes during shunt dysfunction or isolated fourth ventricle (IFV). An accepted treatment to reestablish normal CSF pathways and reequilibrate the transtentorial pressures is endoscopic aqueductal stenting (EAS) to avoid restenosis. In the present paper, the authors studied children treated with EAS during the last decade for both IFV and obstructive hydrocephalus, evaluated its impact on the course of the disease, and identified prognostic factors for EAS success.

METHODS

A noninterventional retrospective study of routinely acquired data was performed, including all hydrocephalic children undergoing EAS between 2011 and 2019 at Hôpital Necker, Paris, France. The following variables were analyzed: etiology of hydrocephalus; number of surgeries before and after stent placement; indication for EAS; type of stent connection (i.e., connected or not to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt); and the stent position. Stent failure was defined as the need to perform further shunt revision. Univariate and multivariate analyses were run to identify factors associated with stent failure.

RESULTS

Seventeen patients with a mean age at stent placement of 6 years (SD 6.5 years, range 1 month–18 years) and with a mean follow-up after EAS of 47.5 months (SD 33.7 months, range 5–120 months) were included in the analysis. The etiology of hydrocephalus was as follows: obstructive tumoral (41%), posthemorrhagic (35%), postinfectious (12%), and dysraphism related (12%). The indication for EAS was IFV (47%), rostral midbrain dysfunction syndrome (35%), prevention of secondary aqueductal stenosis after debulking surgery (12%), or primary aqueductal stenosis (6%). No transient or permanent neurological deficits related to the procedure were observed. After EAS, 10 patients did not require further surgeries (59%), and for the others the number of hydrocephalus-related surgeries significantly decreased after stenting. In univariate analysis posthemorrhagic etiology and prevention of aqueductal stenosis were identified as predictors of a good outcome, whereas in multivariate analysis posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus was found to predict a favorable outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

The results confirm EAS as a first-line treatment for IFV and suggest its efficacy in changing the history of hydrocephalic patients who have undergone multiple operations and who experience rostral midbrain dysfunction syndrome, as well as efficacy in the prevention of aqueductal stenosis in selected cases of obstructive tumoral hydrocephalus.

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Sarah Stricker, Grégoire Boulouis, Sandro Benichi, Florent Gariel, Lorenzo Garzelli, Kevin Beccaria, Anais Chivet, Timothee de Saint Denis, Syril James, Giovanna Paternoster, Michel Zerah, Marie Bourgeois, Nathalie Boddaert, Francis Brunelle, Philippe Meyer, Stephanie Puget, Olivier Naggara, and Thomas Blauwblomme

OBJECTIVE

Hydrocephalus is a strong determinant of poor neurological outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In children, ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) are the dominant cause of ICH. In a large prospective cohort of pediatric patients with ruptured bAVMs, the authors analyzed the rates and predictive factors of hydrocephalus requiring acute external ventricular drainage (EVD) or ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS).

METHODS

The authors performed a single-center retrospective analysis of the data from a prospectively maintained database of children admitted for a ruptured bAVM since 2002. Admission clinical and imaging predictors of EVD and VPS placement were analyzed using univariate and multivariate statistical models.

RESULTS

Among 114 patients (mean age 9.8 years) with 125 distinct ICHs due to ruptured bAVM, EVD and VPS were placed for 55/125 (44%) hemorrhagic events and 5/114 patients (4.4%), respectively. A multivariate nominal logistic regression model identified low initial Glasgow Coma Scale (iGCS) score, hydrocephalus on initial CT scan, the presence of intraventicular hemorrhage (IVH), and higher modified Graeb Scale (mGS) score as strongly associated with subsequent need for EVD (all p < 0.001). All children who needed a VPS had initial hydrocephalus requiring EVD and tended to have higher mGS scores.

CONCLUSIONS

In a large cohort of pediatric patients with ruptured bAVM, almost half of the patients required EVD and 4.4% required permanent VPS. Use of a low iGCS score and a semiquantitative mGS score as indicators of the IVH burden may be helpful for decision making in the emergency setting and thus improve treatment.

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Aymeric Amelot, Kevin Beccaria, Thomas Blauwblomme, Marie Bourgeois, Giovanna Paternoster, Marie-Laure Cuny, Michel Zerah, Christian Sainte-Rose, and Stephanie Puget

OBJECTIVE

Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are most frequently located in the middle cranial fossa. Some patients are asymptomatic whereas others exhibit signs of increased intracranial pressure, seizures, or cognitive and behavioral symptoms. When ACs do require treatment, the optimal surgical technique remains controversial. This study was conducted to assess the most effective surgical treatment for these cysts.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed 240 temporal intracranial ACs managed over a 25-year period in their pediatric neurosurgical unit. Pre- and posttreatment results were clinically and radiologically assessed.

RESULTS

A majority of male patients (74.6%) with an overall median age of 6.9 years were included. The mean cyst size was 107 cm3; the Galassi classification showed 99 (41.3%) type I, 77 (32.1%) type II, and 64 (26.7%) type III cysts. Forty-four ACs (18.3%) were diagnosed after rupture. Surgical management was performed by microsurgery (28.3%), endoscopic cyst fenestration (14.6%), cystoperitoneal shunting (CPS; 16.2%), or subdural shunting (10%). Furthermore, 74 children (30.8%) did not undergo operations. After a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, the mean percentage decrease in cyst volume and the overall rate of clinical improvement did not significantly differ. The endoscopy group had earlier complications and a shorter event-free survival (EFS) time (EFS at 3 years = 67.7%, vs 71.5% and 90.5% for CPS and microsurgery, respectively; p < 0.007) and presented with more subdural hematomas compared to the microsurgery group (p < 0.005). The microsurgery group also showed a tendency for longer cystocisternostomy permeability than the endoscopy group.

CONCLUSIONS

Concerning the management of unruptured symptomatic temporal ACs, microsurgery appears to be the most effective treatment, with longer EFS and fewer complications compared to shunting or endoscopy.

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Pierre-Aurelien Beuriat, Stephanie Puget, Giuseppe Cinalli, Thomas Blauwblomme, Kevin Beccaria, Michel Zerah, and Christian Sainte-Rose

OBJECTIVE

Hydrocephalus remains one of the more common pathologies managed in pediatric neurosurgical units. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) has an advantage over ventriculoperitoneal shunting as it enables patients to remain device free. Multiple shunt devices with various valve designs exist, with no one valve proven to be superior to another. The aim of this study was to describe the management of hydrocephalus and its long-term outcome.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who had been treated for hydrocephalus at the Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades in the period from 1985 to 1995.

RESULTS

Nine hundred seventy-five children had been treated for hydrocephalus. The mean follow-up was 11 ± 7.4 years (mean ± standard deviation). The most common cause of hydrocephalus was tumor related (32.3%), followed by malformative (24.5%) and inflammatory (20.9%) causes. Two hundred eighty patients underwent ETV as the first-line treatment. The procedure was effective in controlling hydrocephalus due to posterior fossa tumors and aqueductal stenosis. Six hundred ninety-five children had initial shunt insertion, with the majority receiving an Orbis-Sigma valve (OSV). The overall OSV shunt survival was 70% at 1 year, 58% at 10 years, and 49% at 20 years. The most common cause for mechanical shunt failure was obstruction (50.7%). Overall shunt survival was statistically different between the OSV and the differential-pressure valve (p = 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy is effective in the management of childhood hydrocephalus. Its success is directly related to the underlying pathology. In the long term, the OSV has significantly higher event-free shunt survival than the classic differential-pressure valve systems

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Thomas Blauwblomme, Olivier Naggara, Francis Brunelle, David Grévent, Stéphanie Puget, Federico Di Rocco, Kevin Beccaria, Giovanna Paternoster, Marie Bourgeois, Manoelle Kossorotoff, Michel Zerah, Christian Sainte-Rose, and Nathalie Boddaert

OBJECT

Arterial spin labeling (ASL)-MRI is becoming a routinely used sequence for ischemic strokes, as it quantifies cerebral blood flow (CBF) without the need for contrast injection. As brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are highflow vascular abnormalities, increased CBF can be identified inside the nidus or draining veins. The authors aimed to analyze the relevance of ASL-MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of children with brain AVM.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 21 patients who had undergone digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI for the diagnosis or follow-up of brain AVM after radiosurgery or embolization. They compared the AVM nidus location between ASL-MRI and 3D contrast-enhanced T1 MRI, as well as the CBF values obtained in the nidus (CBFnidus) and the normal cortex (CBFcortex) before and after treatment.

RESULTS

The ASL-MRI correctly demonstrated the nidus location in all cases. Nidal perfusion (mean CBFnidus 137.7 ml/100 mg/min) was significantly higher than perfusion in the contralateral normal cortex (mean CBFcortex 58.6 ml/100 mg/min; p < 0.0001, Mann-Whitney test). Among 3 patients followed up after embolization, a reduction in both AVM size and CBF values was noted. Among 5 patients followed up after radiosurgery, a reduction in the nidus size was observed, whereas CBFnidus remained higher than CBFcortex.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, ASL-MRI revealed nidus location and patency after treatment thanks to its ability to demonstrate focal increased CBF values. Absolute quantification of CBF values could be relevant in the follow-up of pediatric brain AVM after partial treatment, although this must be confirmed in larger prospective trials.

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Thomas Blauwblomme, Federico Di Rocco, Marie Bourgeois, Kevin Beccaria, Giovanna Paternoster, Juliette Verchere-Montmayeur, Christian Sainte-Rose, Michel Zerah, and Stéphanie Puget

OBJECT

The ideal treatment for subdural hematomas (SDHs) in infants remains debated. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety and efficiency of subduro-subgaleal drainage in SDH.

METHODS

The authors conducted a single-center open-label study between August 2011 and May 2012. Data were prospectively collected in a database and retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS

Eighteen patients (male/female ratio 1.25) with a median age of 5 months were surgically treated. All had preoperative symptoms of intracranial hypertension or seizures. The SDH was bilateral in 16 cases, with a median width of 12 mm. Success of the procedure was noted in 14 of the 18 patients. There was no intraoperative complication or postoperative infection. Drainage failure was attributable to suboptimal positioning of the subdural drain in 2 cases and to migration in 1 case.

CONCLUSIONS

Subduro-subgaleal drainage is an efficient treatment that could be proposed as an alternative to external subdural drainage or subduroperitoneal drainage.

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José Roberto Tude Melo, Federico Di Rocco, Marie Bourgeois, Stephanie Puget, Thomas Blauwblomme, Christian Sainte-Rose, Philippe G. Meyer, and Michel Zerah

Object

Subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common finding on cranial CT in pediatric victims of abusive head trauma (AHT). The hematomas are commonly bilateral and sometimes associated with interhemispheric hyperdensity and/or convexity hemorrhages. There is no consensus regarding the best surgical treatment in such cases nor are there standardized surgical protocols. The authors report their experience and discuss the routine surgical options in the management of traumatic SDH at a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center.

Methods

In this paper, the authors describe a cross-sectional study with consecutive revision of data described in the medical records of Hôpital Universitaire Necker–Enfants Malades between January 2008 and January 2013. During this period, all children younger than 2 years of age who were admitted with a traumatic SDH identified on CT scans were included in this study.

Results

One hundred eighty-four children who had SDH and were younger than 2 years of age were included. Their median age was 5.8 months (range 5 days–23 months), and 70% of the children were male. On admission CT scans, the SDH was bilateral in 52% of cases and homogeneously hypodense in 77%. Neurosurgical treatment was undertaken in 111 children (60%) with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 12 or less, bulging fontanels, or other signs suggestive of intracranial hypertension. The first surgical option was craniotomy in 1.8% (2) of these 111 cases, decompressive craniectomy in 1.8% (2), transcutaneous subdural puncture in 15% (17), external subdural drainage in 16% (18), subdural-subgaleal shunt placement in 17% (19), and subdural-peritoneal shunt placement in 48% (53). In 82% of the children initially treated with transcutaneous subdural puncture and in 50% of those treated with external subdural drainage, increase or persistence of the SDH, CSF or skin infection, or shunt system malfunction was observed and further surgical intervention was required. There was a 26% rate of complications in patients initially treated with a subdural-peritoneal shunt. Although 52% of the patients had bilateral SDH, bilateral drainage was only required in 9.4%.

Conclusions

The choice of treatment should be determined by the clinical and radiological characteristics of the individual case. Although effective on an emergency basis, subdural puncture and external subdural drainage are frequently insufficient to obtain complete resolution of SDH, and temporary placement of a subdural-peritoneal shunt is needed in most cases.

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Raphael Guzman, Arjun V. Pendharkar, Michel Zerah, and Christian Sainte-Rose

Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) has become the procedure of choice for treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus. While patient selection is the most critical factor in determining the success of an ETV procedure, the technical challenge lies in the proper site of fenestration and the successful creation of a patent stoma. Positioning of a single balloon catheter at the level or below the floor of the third ventricle to achieve an optimal ventriculostomy can at times be challenging. Here, the authors describe the use of a double-barrel balloon catheter (NeuroBalloon catheter), which facilitates positioning across, as well as dilation of, the floor of the third ventricle. The surgical technique and nuances of using the NeuroBalloon catheter and the experience in more than 1000 cases are described. The occurrence of vascular injury was less than 0.1%, and the risk of balloon rupture was less than 2%. The authors found that the placement and deployment of this balloon catheter facilitate the creation of an adequate ventriculostomy in a few simple steps.